Synonyms for kroat or Related words with kroat

kampfgeschwader              nsgr              eskadra              njg              geschwader              jagddivision              staffel              fliegerdivision              lehrgeschwader              luftflotte              bombowa              versuchsverband              lotnictwa              hibneryt              kagohl              geschwaderstab              kgzbv              jagdgruppe              fliegerkorps              lindmayr              immola              pitomnik              dywizjon              orlik              gruppe              kraguj              nachtjagd              lssah              fliegerfuhrer              kampfstaffel              aviatik              jagdkorps              gviap              dywizja              kawalerii              kampfgruppen              ocskay              jagdverband              hptm              geschwaders              werobej              luftlande              sqdn              krzesiny              airmobile              orlyak              aufkl              jagdgeschwader              piechoty              onoprienko             



Examples of "kroat"
The 5. Bomber Wing was originally attached to Kampfgeschwader 3 as part of the 10/KG3 and later as the "15.(Kroat.)/KG 3".
15.(Kroat.)/KG 3 was a unit made up of Croatian volunteers flying the Dornier Do 17Z, which saw action on the eastern front until 1944.
The 4. Fighter Wing was attached to the Jagdgeschwader 52. It originally served as part of the III./JG 52, while later it became known as the "15(Kroat.)/JG52". It was led by Franjo Džal.
The highest waterfalls are the Large Waterfall (kroat. "Veliki slap") at the end of the Lower Lakes, over which the Plitvica river falls, and "Galovački buk" at the Upper Lakes.
Upon its return the Legion's bomber squadron was redesignated "1./(Kroat.)KG" after having flown its nine Dornier Do 17Z bombers from Russia back to Croatia. The Dorniers proved a welcome addition to the strike power of the Axis forces fighting the Partisans in occupied Yugoslavia right up to the end of July 1944, when it was incorporated into the ZNDH. In late 1943, a second squadron, "2./(Kroat.)KG" was formed to provide operational training. It was equipped with Italian designed and built CANT Z.1007 and Fiat BR.20 bombers.
December 1942 also saw the return of the HZL bomber squadron to Croatia from service on the Eastern Front, where they had flown more than 1,500 sorties. Upon its return the squadron was redesignated "1./(Kroat.)KG" after having flown its nine Dornier Do 17Z bombers from Russia back to the NDH. The Dorniers proved a welcome addition to the strike power of the Axis forces fighting the Partisans in Yugoslavian territory right up to the end of 1944. In late 1943, a second squadron, "2./(Kroat.)KG" was formed to provide operational training. It was equipped with Italian designed and built CANT Z.1007 and Fiat BR.20 medium bombers.
1944 also saw the return of the HZL fighter squadron to the NDH from service on the Eastern Front. It was redesignated "Kroat. JGr 1" and its operational fighter squadron was redesignated "2./(Kroat.)JGr". Soon after arrival "2./(Kroat.)JGr" sent its ZNDH pilots to collect 12 brand new Macchi C.202 fighters direct from the plant near Milan in Italy. The Italian designed and built Macchi C.202 fighter was the first up-to-date fighter available to the ZNDH. These aircraft retained their Luftwaffe markings whilst in service with the unit. A second training/operational conversion squadron was also formed, designated "3./(Kroat.)JGr" and equipped with Fiat G.50, Macchi C.200 and Fiat CR.42 fighters. After a period of operational conversion, the squadron commenced operations against the frequent incursions over the NDH by USAAF and RAF aircraft. During a period of intensive activity over the summer of 1944, the squadron claimed some 20 Allied aircraft shot down, while at the same time receiving six further Macchi C.202s, as well as four brand new Macchi C.205s.
About 20–22 C.202s were used by Croatia as interceptors of Allied bombers. During 1944, the Air Force of the Independent State of Croatia, "Zrakoplovstvo Nezavisne Države Hrvatske" (ZNDH), received several batches of Macchi C.202s. In January, eight brand-new "Folgore" arrived at Zagreb's Lucko airfield. Another four arrived two weeks later, but one was lost during a test-flight. The first batch of "Folgore" delivered to the ZNDH (16 aircraft) was from the XII series built by Breda after the German occupation of Italy. They equipped "Kroat. JGr 1". These aircraft retained their Luftwaffe markings whilst in service with the unit. 1944 had seen the return of the Croatian Air Force Legion (HZL) fighter squadron to Croatia from service on the Eastern Front. Upon its return the HZL was redesignated "Kroat. JGr 1" and its operational fighter squadron was redesignated "2./(Kroat.)JGr". This unit was equipped with Macchis. A second training / operational conversion squadron was also formed, designated "3./(Kroat.)JGr" and equipped with Fiat G.50, Macchi C.200 and Fiat CR.42 fighters. In March they were scrambled for the first time against an American raid west of Zagreb, but combat was avoided: Croatian Macchi pilots were initially instructed to attack only damaged aircraft and stragglers from the main formation.
Upon its return the squadron was redesignated "1./(Kroat.)JG" and sent its Croatian pilots to collect 12 brand new Macchi C.202 fighters direct from the plant in Italy. These aircraft retained their Luftwaffe markings whilst in service with the unit. A second training squadron was also formed, designated "2./(Kroat.)JG" and equipped with Macchi C.200 and Fiat CR.42 fighters. After a period of operational conversion, the squadron commenced operations against the frequent incursions over Croatia by USAAF and RAF aircraft. During a period of intensive activity over the summer of 1944, the squadron claimed some 20 Allied aircraft shot down, while at the same time receiving further Macchi C.202s, as well as several brand new Macchi C.205s.
JG 52 was also home to attachments from other Axis air forces' fighter arms. A "Staffel" (13(Slow.)/JG 52) of attached Slovak Air Force pilots claimed 215 air kills flying Bf-109G's during a tour of operations on the Eastern Front in 1943, while Croatian pilots, flying as part of the Croatian Air Force Legion, formed 15(Kroat.)/JG52, serving periodically with JG 52 between October 1941 and mid-1944, claiming over 300 kills in 5,000 missions.
December 1942 also saw the return of the Croatian Air Force Legion (HZL) bomber squadron to Croatia from service on the Eastern Front. Upon its return the Legion's bomber squadron was redesignated "1./(Kroat.)KG" after having flown its 9 Dornier Do 17Z bombers from Russia back to Croatia. The Dorniers proved a welcome addition to the strike power of the Axis forces fighting the Yugoslav Partisans right up to the end of 1944.
During the April War, he was in Kosor near Mostar. He flew to Sinj where he joined the newly formed Air Force of the Independent State of Croatia. He joined the Croatian Air Force Legion and went to Fürth near Nürnberg for special training before going to the Eastern Front as part of 15 (kroat.)/JG 52, a Croat "staffel" attached to Jagdgeschwader 52 of the Luftwaffe. Flying a Bf 109E-4, he scored his first victory on 2 March 1942, a R-10 shot down over Magnitovka.
On 30 July 1944, a defecting Do 17Z-5, designation Z8+AH of "Kroat. KGr 1", crash-landed at Cerignola, south of Foggia, Italy. Later, in 1944, a Do 17F-1 was captured by Yugoslav partisans and flown into British captivity in Bari, Italy., although this has not been substantiated by later research. One source cites a total of three Do 17s that landed in Allied-occupied Italy; one Do 17Z on 13 July 1944, the Do 17Z-5 mentioned earlier on 30 July 1944, and another Do 17Z on 10 August.
The capitulation of Italy also brought with it the real threat of an invasion by the Allies of the Dalmatian coast. As a result, on 9 September, orders were received by "1./(Kroat.)KG" to execute two coastal reconnaissance sorties over the central and south Adriatic each morning and afternoon. On 10 October one of its Dornier Do 17Zs was intercepted by eight Spitfire Mk.VIII fighters of No. 92 Squadron RAF near the coast of Italy. All of the fighters made firing passes on the Dornier, which was shot down, the crew bailing out. One Spitfire was hit by return fire and crashed into the sea, killing its pilot. After this, reconnaissance sorties were confined to the vicinity of the Dalmatian coast.
Džal was a member of the 4th Legionnaire Fighter Wing of the Legion and was sent to the Eastern Front in September 1941. Promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, he became the first commanding officer of 15(Kroat)/JG 52. From October 1941 to November 1942 he claimed 16 confirmed victories (and 3-5 unconfirmed) over the course of 157 missions. On 28 July he was shot down by Alexander Pokryshkin but bailed out and survived. The wing returned to the Independent State of Croatia on leave in December 1942 and returned to the Eastern Front in February 1943. In November 1943, Džal was made commanding officer of the Croatian Air Force Legion.
The Independent State of Croatia was formed during the German Invasion of Yugoslavia in April 1941. It formed an air unit called "Hrvatska zrakoplovna legija" ("Croatian Air Force Legion") on 27 June 1941 for service against the Soviets It had 160 airmen who attended German aviation schools such as "Kampffliegerschule 3" on the Baltic to train on the Do 17Z. On 31 October 1941, the unit was assigned to "Kampfgeschwader 3" as "10.(kroatisch)/KG 3", with 15 Do 17Zs, on the Eastern Front. The unit did not suffer its first fatalities until 1 December 1941, during the Battle of Moscow. By the time of its withdrawal to Croatia in February/March 1942, the unit was credited with 366 combat sorties, 71 low-level attacks, four villages, 173 buildings, 276 enemy vehicles destroyed and 11 enemy aircraft shot down. Another squadron was sent to the Eastern Front in July 1942, using German-owned Do 17Zs, where they were designated as 15.(kroat.)/KG 53. They were withdrawn to Croatia in November 1942.
The first confirmed air victory was claimed by "Unteroffizier" Leopold Hrastovcan on 24 April 1944, against a B-24 shot down near the village of Zapresic (Zagorje). According to some sources, during these first sorties, Croat C.202s claimed 11 to 16 air victories, but only three more were confirmed. In May 1944, the Croatians received four C.202s from the Luftwaffe in Niš. During the ferry flight, one Macchi crash landed near Zemun airfield. The Croat unit received the last six "Folgore" and three or four brand new Macchi C.205s, around June 1944. Even if the Croatian Air Force Legion was disbanded at the end of July, and replaced by the Croatian Air Force Group ("HZS"), the Macchi remained at Borovo. During a period of intensive activity over the summer, the squadron claimed some 20 Allied aircraft shot down. At the end of the summer, the C.202s still in flying condition based in Borovo were used by Croatian cadets for training. In September 1944, Luftwaffe pilots flew all airworthy "Folgore" to Borongaj where they were used only for training. Croatian pilots did not at first have a high opinion of the Macchi fighter, due to its armament of just two 12.7 mm and two 7.7mm machine guns, regarded as scarcely effective against the heavily armed US four-engined bombers. Eastern front veteran "Major" Josip Helebrant, an 11-kill flying ace (used to flying Bf 109Gs) and the CO of "2./(Kroat.)JGr", initially regarded the Macchis as "old, weary and unusable", and described the morale of his men as "low", and his unit's results as "nil", primarily because of the NDH's underdeveloped air-raid warning system, which saw the Croatian Macchi fighters often taking off to intercept attacking Allied bombers when they were already overhead.