Synonyms for leccinum or Related words with leccinum

friesii              gymnopus              caesia              pholiotina              ambiguum              peziza              perrieri              caliginosa              erubescens              gymnopilus              olivaceum              clavaria              interrupta              bernardii              oreina              robustum              hebeloma              geoglossum              rugulosus              obesa              lepiota              lilacina              cacaliae              angulatus              cyanescens              brunnescens              lepista              tortuosa              entoloma              chalciporus              pluteus              decipiens              granulatus              hygrophorus              zuphium              confusa              conica              pallescens              denticulata              delicatula              punicea              pustulata              costata              sinuosa              connarus              sordida              fuegiana              diaphanum              leucocoprinus              quercicola             



Examples of "leccinum"
Leccinum pseudoscabrum is an edible species of fungus in the genus "Leccinum".
Leccinum variicolor is a species of bolete fungus in the genus "Leccinum".
Leccinum rufum is a species of fungus in the genus "Leccinum".
This is a list of species in the genus "Leccinum". , Index Fungorum accepts 135 species in "Leccinum".
Leccinum crocipodium is a bolete mushroom in the genus "Leccinum". Originally called "Boletus duriusculus" by Hungarian–Croatian mycologist Stephan Schulzer von Müggenburg in 1874, it was transferred to "Leccinum" by Rolf Singer in 1947.
Leccinum griseum is a common, edible mushroom in the genus "Leccinum". It is found below hornbeam, usually in small groups. Young mushrooms with firm flesh are very palatable.
The "Leccinum" genus includes two well-known mushroom species named after the trees they can usually be found next to. The "Leccinum aurantiacum" (as well as the "Leccinum versipelle"), found under aspen trees, and the "Leccinum scabrum" (as well as the "L. holopus"), found under birch trees. The secondary mentioned species, are significantly different in cap colour only. Both types are very sought after, being highly palatable, while more common than the B. edulis.
"Leccinum" species are generally found in the woodlands of Europe, Asia, and North America, forming ectomycorrhizal associations with trees. Most "Leccinum" species are mycorrhizal specialists, associating with trees of a single genus. "Leccinum aurantiacum" is an exception, however, occurring in mycorrhizal association with poplar, birch, and oak.
Initially named as a species of "Boletus" by German mycologist Friedrich Rostkovius in 1844, the fungus was later transferred to "Leccinum" by Roy Watling in 1960. Synonyms resulting from transfer to different genera include: "Krombholzia holopoda" and "K. holopus" (both published by Albert Pilát in 1951); "Krombholziella holopus" (Josef Šutara, 1989); "Trachypus holopus" (Paul Konrad and André Maublanc, 1952), and "Trachypus scaber" f. "holopus" (Henri Romagnesi, 1939). Other synonyms, according to Index Fungorum, include "Leccinum olivaceosum", described from France in 1994, and "Leccinum aerugineum" (1991). "Leccinum holopus" is classified in section "Scabra" of genus "Leccinum", a grouping that includes Northern Hemisphere species associating exclusively with birch.
"Leccinum" species are generally found in the woodlands of Europe, Asia, and North America, forming ectomycorrhizal associations with trees. Most "Leccinum" species are mycorrhizal specialists, associating with trees of a single genus. "Leccinum aurantiacum" is an exception, however, occurring in mycorrhizal association with birch, poplar, and oak.
"Leccinum rugosiceps" is classified in the section "Luteoscabrum" of genus "Leccinum", a grouping of species that associated with oak and hornbeam. Others in this section include "L. albellum" and "L. pseudoscabrum".
Leccinum versipelle, also known as "Boletus testaceoscaber" or the orange birch bolete, is a common edible mushroom (given the right preparation) in the genus "Leccinum". It is found below birches from July through to November, and turns black when cooked.
Leccinum brunneobadium is a species of bolete fungus in the family Boletaceae. Found in Europe, it was originally described in 1970 by J. Blum as a species of "Boletus". Lannoy and Estadès transferred it to the genus "Leccinum" in 1994.
Leccinum leucophaeum is a species of bolete fungus in the family Boletaceae. It was originally described as new to science in 1825 by Christian Hendrik Persoon, and transferred to "Leccinum" by French mycologist Marcel Bon in 1981.
Leccinum alboroseolum is a species of bolete fungus in the family Boletaceae. Originally described in 1969 as a variety of "Boletus immutabilis", it was transferred to "Leccinum" in 1994. It is found in Europe.
Leccinum atrostipitatum is edible and enjoyable, but do your homework and eat at your own risk.
"Leccinum manzanitae" was first described by the American mycologist Harry Delbert Thiers in 1971, from collections made in San Mateo County, California, the previous year. In that state, it is known as the manzanita bolete because of its close association with manzanita trees. It is classified in subsection "Versicolores" of the section "Leccinum" in the genus "Leccinum". Closely related species in this section include "L. piceinum", "L. monticola", "L. albostipitatum", and "L. versipelle".
Various authorities have treated the taxon as either a "Boletus", "Leccinum", or "Tylopilus", depending on which morphological characteristics they deemed most significant. Rolf Singer initially considered the species most appropriately placed in "Tylopilus" on account of the reddish-brown spore print, a taxonomic opinion shared by Alexander H. Smith and Harry Thiers, who wrote "Concerning whether or not the species should be placed in "Leccinum", we can only say that the color of the stipe ornamentation is merely a reflection of the color of the stipe generally and that it does not change color in a characteristic pattern as it ages. For this reason we exclude it from "Leccinum" and agree with Singer that it is a "Tylopilus"." Later however, Singer thought the somewhat scabrous ornamentation of the stipe justified a placement in "Leccinum". René Pomerleau had previously (1959) placed the species in "Leccinum", but this transfer was invalid, as no basionym was specified.
"Leccinum" species in general have been presumed to be edible for the most part, but there are reports of poisoning after eating as yet unidentified members of the genus in North America, even after thorough cooking. The orange- to red-capped species, including "L. insigne", are suspected. Species of "Leccinum" often cause nausea when consumed raw.
"Leccinum manzanitae" is a mycorrhizal species. Its fruit bodies grow singly to scattered in soil under madrone and manzanita. Known to occur only in North America, it is commonly found from central California to southern Oregon, but has also been reported further north in Washington and British Columbia (Canada). Thiers considered it the most abundant "Leccinum" in California.