Synonyms for lievsay or Related words with lievsay

stellrecht              homeier              vanderbundt              bifferty              jutze              hinnant              horack              sennie              battin              pitlock              lichtfuss              cleavinger              vonkuske              laitner              carnine              stahley              bertman              schumaker              engblom              myslenski              minisi              harlicka              balsdon              hollandsworth              heitzig              ladouceur              hoovler              rydstrom              schlender              semanick              jungnell              wamsley              lukowich              chorney              werenich              viksten              woytowich              ottewell              gretzinger              cannom              appelman              soulliere              yerke              schille              petryk              lalama              farbelow              saylor              podivinsky              wasner             



Examples of "lievsay"
Sleepy Hollow (film) - Frank Morrone,Skip Lievsay, Gary Alpers
Skip Lievsay is an Oscar-winning New York-based supervising sound editor, re-recording mixer and sound designer for film and television, Lievsay has worked with filmmakers and directors including the Coen brothers, Martin Scorsese, Spike Lee, Jonathan Demme and Robert Altman.
Carter Burwell has scored all of the Coens' films, aside from "Crimewave" (1985), although T-Bone Burnett produced much of the traditional music in "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" and "The Ladykillers", and was in charge of archive music for "The Big Lebowski". Skip Lievsay handles the sound editing for all of the Coens' films.
The film was awarded the Dolby Family fellowship, a grant that allows filmmakers to finish their sound design and mix in Dolby Atmos. Sound Designers and Re-recording mixers J.M. Davey and Zach Seivers completed the original sound design and mix as well as the Dolby Atmos remix. Skip Lievsay, who won the Academy Award for Best Sound for his work on "Gravity", served as a mentor to Davey and Seivers for the Atmos remix.
The Coens similarly tend to work with certain crews as well, especially Roger Deakins, Jess Gonchor, Skip Lievsay, and Mary Zophres. They used cinematographer Barry Sonnenfeld on their first three films, through "Miller's Crossing", until Sonnenfeld left to pursue his own directing career. Deakins has been the Coen brothers' cinematographer for all their subsequent films except "Burn After Reading", on which they employed Emmanuel Lubezki, and "Inside Llewyn Davis", on which they employed Bruno Delbonnel.
Supervising sound editor Skip Lievsay used a Synclavier to recreate and improve the original recording of the neuralyzer sound effect from the first film (which was the sound of a strobe flash as it recycles) by removing some distortion. For some of the scenes with the Serleena creature, the sound crew "took tree branches, put them inside a rubber membrane and pushed that around and added some water." For the special effects scene where the subway train is attacked by Jeff the Worm, a specially designed vise was used to crush a subway car and make it look as if it had been bitten in half.
Dennis Lim of "The New York Times" stressed that "there is virtually no music on the soundtrack of this tense, methodical thriller. Long passages are entirely wordless. In some of the most gripping sequences what you hear mostly is a suffocating silence." Skip Lievsay, the film's sound editor called this approach "quite a remarkable experiment," and added that "suspense thrillers in Hollywood are traditionally done almost entirely with music. The idea here was to remove the safety net that lets the audience feel like they know what's going to happen. I think it makes the movie much more suspenseful. You're not guided by the score and so you lose that comfort zone."
Supervising sound editor Skip Lievsay used a Synclavier to recreate and improve the original recording of the neuralyzer sound effect from the first film (which was the sound of a strobe flash as it recycles) by removing some distortion. For some of the scenes with the Serleena creature, the sound crew "took tree branches, put them inside a rubber membrane and pushed that around and added some water." For the special effects scene where the subway train is attacked by Jeff the Worm, a specially designed vise was used to crush a subway car and make it look as if it had been bitten in half.
In 1979, the Folger commissioned Peter Michaels to restore the portrait. In removing the overpaint, he uncovered the coat of arms, and his assistant Lisa Oehrl made a sketch of it, unaware of the sitter's identity. It was Lilly Lievsay, Folger cataloguer of manuscripts, and Folger curator Laetitia Yeandle who, on the basis of this drawing, linked the image of the sketch conclusively to the armorial coat of Hamersley. The restorative work also clarified the date, which had been tampered with to yield the year 1611 (when Shakespeare was 47). Beneath the second 1 of that date a 2 is clearly visible, indicating it was executed in 1612, 8 years after Oxford's death, when Hamersley was 47 years old. Above the date is written "aetatis suae.47" (aged 47). He had not, at that time, been granted his coat of arms, and art historian William Pressly conjectures that they were either included in anticipation of the honour, or painted in later.
"True Grit" has received honors in different categories, ranging from recognition of the movie itself, to its direction, art direction, cinematography, score and writing, as well as for performances by the cast, mainly Bridges for Best Actor and Steinfeld for Best Supporting Actress. The Coen's work on "True Grit"'s screenplay scored them a nomination from the Writers Guild of America, but lost to Aaron Sorkin for "The Social Network". Deakins' work on "True Grit"s cinematography earned him more than ten nominations, including an award from the Boston Society of Film Critics. The Cinema Audio Society Awards presented Peter F. Kurland, Skip Lievsay, Craig Berkey and Greg Orloff their Outstanding Achievement in Sound Mixing for Motion Pictures honor in 2011.
The City of Blue Springs has a Mayor-Council-Administrator form of government as set forth in the Home Rule City Charter. The City Council is the governing body of the City, elected by the public. The City of Blue Springs employs a workforce of more than 285 employees who serve the City and its residents under the leadership and direction of the City Administrator. The City Administrator is appointed by the City Council and is responsible for the implementation of policies and decisions made by the Mayor and City Council. The elected governing body for the City of Blue Springs is composed of a Mayor and six Councilpersons. The current elected officials () are: Mayor Carson Ross, District 1 Councilman Dale Carter, District 1 Councilman Jeff Quibell, District 2 Councilman Chris Lievsay, District 2 Councilman Kent Edmondson, District 3 Councilman Susan Culpepper, District 3 Councilman Ron Fowler.
The Coens minimized the score used in the film, leaving large sections devoid of music. The concept was Ethan's, who persuaded a skeptical Joel to go with the idea. There is some music in the movie, scored by the Coens' longtime composer, Carter Burwell, but after finding that "most musical instruments didn't fit with the minimalist sound sculpture he had in mind [...] he used singing bowls, standing metal bells traditionally employed in Buddhist meditation practice that produce a sustained tone when rubbed." The movie contains a "mere" 16 minutes of music, with several of those in the end credits. The music in the trailer was called "Diabolic Clockwork" by Two Steps from Hell. Sound editing and effects were provided by another longtime Coens collaborator, Skip Lievsay, who used a mixture of emphatic sounds (gun shots) and ambient noise (engine noise, prairie winds) in the mix. The Foley for the captive bolt pistol used by Chigurh was created using a pneumatic nail gun.
"Apocalypse Now" was also notable for being among the first Hollywood productions to be released in select 70mm theaters in a surround sound configuration consisting of three front channels, two rear channels, and a low-frequency volume boost. Later known as "5.1", this stereo configuration would become the standard film sound format for 35mm prints following the industry's conversion to digital sound during the 1990s (though unlike digital 5.1, the six-track stereo prints used by "Apocalypse Now" stored the split-surround sounds on the same tracks as the sub-woofer channel, limiting the special rear stereo effects to only high frequency sounds). Murch and Francis Ford Coppola are widely credited with having first conceived of a 5.1 loudspeaker configuration during the making of "Apocalypse Now", but this is a common misconception. Though "Apocalypse Now" was one of the most famous instance of a 5.1 sound design before the 1990s, the practice of mixing films for at least three front channels and two separate surround channels actually originated during the 1950s and was later used on such films as "Around the World in 80 Days" (1956), "Raintree County" (1959), "How the West Was Won" (1962), "Tommy" (1975), as well as the documentaries "North of Superior" (1971) and "To Fly!" (1976). The vaunted 5.1 technology used on "Apocalypse Now" in 1979 was adapted from these pre-existing practices not by Murch or Coppola but by Dolby engineers Max Bell and David Watts, who first used it on 70mm prints of Superman in 1978. Despite these technological precedents, contemporary sound designers like Skip Lievsay and Gary Rydstrom routinely consider Murch's innovative and award-winning mix for "Apocalypse Now" to be a major influence on their own work.