Synonyms for lorisiformes or Related words with lorisiformes

lemuriformes              chiromyiformes              tarsiiformes              lemuroidea              daubentoniidae              infraorder              tarsiidae              lorisidae              superorder              indriidae              lemuridae              cleridae              lorisoidea              rhinocerotoidea              strepsirrhini              aphelinidae              simiiformes              scarabaeoidea              vanilloideae              tipulidae              oestridae              acanthopterygii              chirocentridae              ostariophysi              xenarthra              silphidae              galatheoidea              dipsadinae              mymaridae              latidae              cheirogaleidae              coccinellidae              megaspilidae              atelidae              eupteleaceae              metatheria              infraclass              cyclorrhapha              stratiomyidae              eucarida              lepidosauria              cantharidae              apocrita              neopterygii              penaeidae              dolichoderinae              chrysomeloidea              cavolinioidea              viverridae              haplorrhini             



Examples of "lorisiformes"
The classification of lemurs within the suborder Strepsirrhini is equally controversial, although the most experts agree on the same phylogenetic tree. In one taxonomy, infraorder Lemuriformes contains all living strepsirrhines in two superfamilies, Lemuroidea for all lemurs and Lorisoidea for the lorisoids (lorisids and galagos). Alternatively, the lorisoids are sometimes placed in their own infraorder, Lorisiformes, separate from the lemurs. In another taxonomy published by Colin Groves, the aye-aye was placed in its own infraorder, Chiromyiformes, while the rest of the lemurs were placed in Lemuriformes and the lorisoids in Lorisiformes.
Although treeshrews, plesiadapids, and the like are now no longer considered to be closely related to lemurs, disagreements persist over the classification of lemurs and related groups, resulting in competing arrangements of the infraorders and superfamilies within Strepsirrhini. In one taxonomy, infraorder Lemuriformes contains all living strepsirrhines in two superfamilies, Lemuroidea for all lemurs and Lorisoidea for the lorisoids (lorisids and galagos). Alternatively, the lorisoids are sometimes placed in their own infraorder, Lorisiformes, separate from the lemurs. Yet another classification published by Colin Groves placed the aye-aye in its own infraorder, Chiromyiformes, while the rest of the lemurs were placed in Lemuriformes and the lorisoids in Lorisiformes.
Lemuriformes is an infraorder of primate that falls under the suborder Strepsirrhini. It includes the lemurs of Madagascar, as well as the galagos and lorisids of Africa and Asia, although a popular alternative taxonomy places the lorisoids in their own infraorder, Lorisiformes.
A list of the families of the living primates is given below, together with one possible classification into ranks between order and family. Other classifications are also used. For example, an alternative classification of the living Strepsirrhini divides them into two infraorders, Lemuriformes and Lorisiformes.
Lorisoidea is a superfamily of nocturnal primates found throughout Africa and Asia. Members include the galagos and the lorisids. As strepsirrhines, lorisoids are related to the lemurs of Madagascar and are sometimes included in the infraorder Lemuriformes, although they are also sometimes placed in their own infraorder, Lorisiformes Gregory, 1915.
Within Strepsirrhini, two common classifications include either two infraorders (Adapiformes and Lemuriformes) or three infraorders (Adapiformes, Lemuriformes, Lorisiformes). A less common taxonomy places the aye-aye (Daubentoniidae) in its own infraorder, Chiromyiformes. In some cases, plesiadapiforms are included within the order Primates, in which case Euprimates is sometimes treated as a suborder, with Strepsirrhini becoming an infraorder, and the Lemuriformes and others become parvorders. Regardless of the infraordinal taxonomy, crown strepsirrhines are composed of 10 families, three of which are extinct. These three extinct families included the giant lemurs of Madagascar, many of which died out within the last 1,000 years following human arrival on the island.
Within Strepsirrhini, two common classifications include either two infraorders (Adapiformes and Lemuriformes) or three infraorders (Adapiformes, Lemuriformes, Lorisiformes). A less common taxonomy places the aye-aye (Daubentoniidae) in its own infraorder, Chiromyiformes. In some cases, plesiadapiforms are included within the order Primates, in which case Euprimates is sometimes treated as a suborder, with Strepsirrhini becoming an infraorder, and the Lemuriformes and others become parvorders. Regardless of the infraordinal taxonomy, Strepsirrhini is composed of three ranked superfamilies and 14 families, seven of which are extinct. Three of these extinct families included the recently extinct giant lemurs of Madagascar, many of which died out within the last 1,000 years following human arrival on the island.
Since the first taxonomic classification of lemurs, many changes have been made to lemur taxonomy. Within the primate order, treeshrews (order Scandentia) were considered basal, prosimian primates—close relatives of lemurs—until the 1980s. Colugos, also incorrectly referred to as "flying lemurs", were once considered lemur-like primates, but were reclassified as close relatives of bats, and more recently as close relatives of primates within their own order, Dermoptera. Primates, together with their closest relatives, the treeshrews, colugos, and long-extinct plesiadapiforms, form the taxonomically unranked Euarchonta clade within the Euarchontoglires. Lorisids, some of which were originally placed in the genus "Lemur" by Carl Linnaeus, have since been moved into either their own infraorder (Lorisiformes) or their own superfamily (Lorisoidea) within Lemuriformes.
"Plesiopithecus teras" was first described in 1992 by paleoanthropologist Elwyn L. Simons. The holotype, which was found at the base of the Jebel Qatrani Formation at the Egyptian Fayum in quarry L-41 and dated to the latest Eocene, included a right mandible with intact dentition ranging from the third molar up to the first anterior tooth. Simons acknowledged that the taxonomic interpretation was complicated, though he initially decided to classify under superfamily Hominoidea (apes) due to its flat and broad lower molars. Its bizarre and specialized traits made it difficult to classify until the discovery of its skull, reported in 1994, showed it had a postorbital bar, proving that it was a strepsirrhine primate. "Plesiopithecus" was then placed within a new superfamily, Plesiopithecoidea tentatively under "Infraorder cf. Lorisiformes". The superfamily has also been grouped under the infraorder Lemuriformes.
Strepsirrhini or Strepsirhini (; ) is a suborder of primates that includes the lemuriform primates, which consist of the lemurs of Madagascar, galagos ("bushbabies") and pottos from Africa, and the lorises from India and southeast Asia. Collectively they are referred to as strepsirrhines. Also belonging to the suborder are the extinct adapiform primates, a diverse and widespread group that thrived during the Eocene (56 to 34 million years ago [mya]) in Europe, North America, and Asia, but disappeared from most of the Northern Hemisphere as the climate cooled; the last of the adapiforms died out at the end of the Miocene (~7 mya). Adapiforms are sometimes referred to as being "lemur-like", although the diversity of both lemurs and adapiforms does not support this comparison. The two leading taxonomic classifications for the suborder divide living strepsirrhine primates into either two superfamilies (Lemuroidea and Lorisoidea) within the infraorder Lemuriformes or two infraorders, Lemuriformes and Lorisiformes. The suborder represents a related group, and replaced the widely used and now obsolete suborder Prosimii ("prosimians"), which included strepsirrhines and tarsiers, a grouping based primarily on shared anatomical traits. Today, Strepsirrhini excludes the tarsiers, which are now grouped in the other major primate suborder, Haplorhini, along with the monkeys and apes (simians or anthropoids). Strepsirrhines are often inappropriately referred to as "living fossils". Instead, they have evolved for millions of years under natural selection, and have diversified to fill many ecological niches. Some of their traits may be derived from ancestral primates, while others are unique to strepsirrhines.