Synonyms for luigi_lambruschini or Related words with luigi_lambruschini

giovanni_francesco_commendone              tolomeo_gallio              costantino_patrizi_naro              marzio_ginetti              fabrizio_paolucci              ugo_poletti              cesare_facchinetti              michele_bonelli              enrico_caetani              flavio_chigi              francesco_pisani              benedetto_aloisi_masella              ercole_consalvi              pietro_fumasoni_biondi              annibale_albani              clemente_micara              girolamo_colonna              giuseppe_spinelli              girolamo_bernerio              leonardo_antonelli              alfonso_gesualdo              lorenzo_campeggio              ippolito_aldobrandini              silvio_valenti_gonzaga              cristoforo_madruzzo              carlo_confalonieri              carlo_odescalchi              innocenzo_cibo              serafino_vannutelli              ludovico_madruzzo              vincenzo_vannutelli              amleto_giovanni_cicognani              gaetano_bisleti              gian_francesco_albani              rebiba              sebastiano_baggio              pier_donato_cesi              antonio_agliardi              francesco_soderini              giuseppe_albani              agnelo_rossi              giacomo_savelli              giacomo_biffi              giovanni_mercati              francesco_marchetti_selvaggiani              oliviero_carafa              ulderico_carpegna              cerretti              galeazzo_marescotti              giovanni_salviati             



Examples of "luigi_lambruschini"
Luigi Lambruschini (6 March 1776 – 12 May 1854) was an Italian cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church in the mid nineteenth century.
He worked at the secretariat of State of the Holy See as an assistant to Cardinal Luigi Lambruschini from 1824 to 1830.
He was consecrated on 18 July 1841 in the church of San Carlo ai Catinari, Rome, by Cardinal Luigi Lambruschini and was made assistant at the Pontifical Throne on 20 July 1841.
The Pope appointed Cardinal Luigi Lambruschini to begin negotiations with the Russian empire with the aim of establishing better relations and increased freedom of action. Russia rejected the term "concordat" with the Pope as a name for the agreement.
In 1826, Civitavecchia was separated from the Diocese of Viterbo and Toscanella and united with that of Porto, but in 1854, with Corneto, it was made an independent see. Mention should be made of the Cardinal Bishop of Porto Luigi, Lambruschini (1847), who restored the cathedral and the episcopal palace.
In 1826, Civitavecchia was separated from the Diocese of Viterbo and Toscanella and united with that of Porto, but in 1854, with Corneto, it was made an independent see. Mention should be made of the Cardinal Bishop of Porto Luigi, Lambruschini (1847), who restored the cathedral and the episcopal palace.
His father was a notary. He studied at the Pontifical Roman Seminary, where he received his Doctor of Theology degree in 1841, followed by a degree "in utroque iure" from the Sapienza University of Rome. In 1842, he was ordained a priest and taken under the sponsorship of Luigi Lambruschini, the Cardinal Secretary of State.
The procedure was favourable, because the mandate of Mgr. de Bruillard, adjusted according to observations of Luigi Lambruschini, Cardinal Prefect of the Sacred Congregation of Rites at Rome, was signed on 18 September 1851, and was published the following 10 November 1851. In it, the bishop of Grenoble promulgated this judgement:
On 15 March 1852 he was named titular Archbishop of Thebes, and, three days after, Apostolic Nuncio in Brazil. Once he received the archiepiscopal order on 4 July 1852 from cardinal Luigi Lambruschini, he decided to leave for Brazil, but he could not enter the country because of a plague epidemic, so he went to the United States. He was the first Papal Nuncio in the United States.
In 1831, after lengthy negotiations, Gregory XVI stronger than their predecessors, Leo XII and Pius VIII, and supported by its unconditional Secretary of State, Cardinal Luigi Lambruschini, appointed six bishops, including Pedro Pablo Vazquez dioceses were restored and seminars for 1851 increased the number of priests to 3,232. With that decision, first to the Mexican diocese bishops were appointed; without requiring permission from the Spanish Crown. Among those who participated in the process were: Pedro Pablo Vazquez, Pope Gregory XVI and Ignacio Valdivieso.
Moreover, the conclave of 1846 was steeped in a factional division between conservatives and liberals. The conservatives supported Luigi Lambruschini, Gregory XVI's Cardinal Secretary of State. Liberals supported two candidates: Pasquale Tommaso Gizzi and the then 54-year-old Mastai-Ferretti. A fourth "papabile" was Cardinal Ludovico Micara, the Dean of the College of Cardinals, who was favored by the residents of Rome itself, but he never gained support among the cardinals.
Gianelli was made the archpriest of Chiavari in 1826 after Luigi Lambruschini appointed him and he held that position until 1837. He was the founder of the Missionaries of Saint Alphonsus in 1827 for men and that order lasted from that point to 1848. He founded the Sisters of Our Lady of the Garden on 12 January 1829. It was a teaching order for females that worked with the sick. Its work continues today in Europe, Asia and the United States of America. The order was formally approved by Pope Leo XIII on 7 June 1882, years after his death.
It was the issue of the government of the Papal States that was to prove central to the 1846 conclave. The College of Cardinals was split into two factions. The conservatives wished to see a continuation of papal absolutism in the governance of the Papal States, a continuation of the hardline policies of Pope Gregory XVI and his right-wing Secretary of State, Luigi Lambruschini, while the liberals wished for some measure of moderate reform and favored two candidates in Tommaso Pasquale Gizzi and Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti. A fourth "papabile" was Cardinal Ludovico Micara, the Dean of the College of Cardinals, who was favored by the residents of Rome itself but he never gained support among the cardinals. Lambruschini himself was the leader of the conservatives while Tommaso Bernetti who had served as Pro-Secretary of State under Pope Leo XII and the early part of Pope Gregory XVI's reign was the leader of the liberal faction.
The Revolution of 1830, which overthrew the House of Bourbon, had just inflicted a severe blow on the Catholic royalist party in France. Almost the first act of the new French government was to seize Ancona, thus throwing Italy, and particularly the Papal States, into a state of confusion and political upheaval. In the course of the struggle that ensued, it was more than once necessary to call in Austrian troops to fight the red-shirted republicans engaged in a guerrilla campaign. The conservative administration of the Papal States postponed their promised reforms after a series of bombings and assassination attempts. The replacement of Tommaso Bernetti by Luigi Lambruschini as Cardinal Secretary of State in 1836 did nothing to appease the situation.
He studied at the "Academia dei Nobili", mainly diplomacy and law. In 1834 he gave a student presentation, attended by several cardinals, on "papal judgements". For his presentation he received awards for academic excellence, and gained the attention of Vatican officials. Cardinal Secretary of State Luigi Lambruschini introduced him to Vatican congregations. During a cholera epidemic in Rome he ably assisted Cardinal Sala in his duties as overseer of all the city hospitals. Pope Gregory XVI appointed Pecci on 14 February 1837, as personal prelate even before he was ordained priest on 31 December 1837, by the Vicar of Rome, Cardinal Carlo Odescalchi. He celebrated his first mass together with his priest brother Giuseppe. He received his doctorate in theology in 1836 and doctorates of civil and Canon Law in Rome also.