Synonyms for lungkwitz or Related words with lungkwitz

keidel              huppen              fehringer              munggenast              wassili              obermayer              clasen              widemann              stessl              bursche              tessenow              schoemann              faehlmann              bieberstein              vallentin              kirchbach              matzen              boeckl              matzerath              launitz              ottho              treusch              ottomar              blumauer              geyling              litzmann              aichinger              kupelwieser              laurenz              fueter              luckhardt              kumpf              blome              preissler              pfyffer              veltheim              rautenkranz              leinberger              oppitz              kronawitter              bockelmann              drehle              eberan              wangelin              burmann              unterkircher              folsach              caspari              aschenbrenner              nobiling             



Examples of "lungkwitz"
Karl Friedrich Hermann Lungkwitz was born on March 14, 1813 in Halle, Saxony-Anhalt to hosiery manufacturer Johann Gottfried Lungkwitz and his wife Friederike Wilhelmine (Hecht) Lungkwitz.
On January 24, 1874, Bickler married Martha Lungkwitz, daughter of artist Hermann Lungkwitz. The couple had nine children, eight of whom survived infancy.
Gunsmith E. Krauskoff and silversmith Adolph Lungkwitz manufactured gun caps at this location during the Civil War.
Lungkwitz was enrolled at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts from 1840–1843 and received his artistic training under the tutelage of Adrian Ludwig Richter. After receiving an academy certificate of achievement in 1843 for his sketch of the Elbe River, Lungkwitz spent the next three years honing his artistic skills in Salzkammergut and the Northern Limestone Alps in Bavaria.
Lungkwitz married Elisabeth "Elise" Petri, sister of Friedrich Richard Petri. The couple had six children. Elisasbeth died in 1880 and is buried at the Oakwood Cemetery in Austin, Texas. Lungkwitz died in Austin on February 10, 1891, and is buried next to his wife.
In 1870 he accepted an $1,800 a year appointment in Austin as photographer for the Texas General Land Office under commissioner Jacob Kuechler, brother-in-law to Friedrich Richard Petri. He held the position for the entirety of the administration of Governor Edmund J. Davis. His daughter Martha Lungkwitz Bickler also received an appointment as Texas General Land Office clerk in an era were few women worked in state government. In 1877, Martha's husband Jacob Bickler founded the Texas German and English Academy in Austin, where Lungkwitz taught drawing and painting. Bickler became superintendent of Galveston public schools in 1887, and also founded the Bickler Academy in Austin in 1892. Lungkwitz gave private lessons at both Austin and Galveston whenever he visited the Bicklers. In Blanco County, Lungkwitz assisted his daughter Eva and her husband Richard Klappenbach on their sheep ranch near Johnson City.
Hermann Lungkwitz (1813–1891) was a 19th Century German-born Texas romantic landscape artist and photographer whose work became the first pictoral record of the Texas Hill Country.
In 1850, the Lungkwitz and Petri families emigrated to the United States, landing first in New York City. They migrated to Wheeling, West Virginia, but decided on the destination of Texas in 1851.
Kuechler returned to Texas in 1867 and entered the political arena, becoming a leading German voice in the Reconstructionist Republican Party. He was appointed deputy collector of customs at San Antonio. Kuechler was elected a delegate to the state Constitutional Convention of 1868–69. He was elected commissioner of the Texas General Land Office in 1870, holding the position for the entire four years of the administration of Governor Edmund J. Davis. In 1873, he appointed Jacob Bickler as assistant draftsman and calculator. Kuechler's wife's brother-in-law Hermann Lungkwitz received an appointment for the Texas General Land Office, and Lungkwitz's daughter Martha Lungkwitz Bickler became a clerk with the office.
Lungkwitz and his brother-in-law Friedrich Richard Petri joined other students in the failed 1849 May Uprising in Dresden, an event at the tail end of the Revolutions of 1848 resulting from the refusal of Frederick Augustus II to recognize a constitutional monarchy.
In 1850, the Lungkwitz and Petri families emigrated to the United States, landing first in New York City. They migrated to Wheeling, West Virginia, but decided on the destination of Texas in 1851. Their journey took them by ship to New Orleans and Indianola, and then riding an oxcart to New Braunfels. In 1852, the two families bought a 320-acre farm for $400 in the settlement of Pedernales, Texas near Fredericksburg and took up farming and cattle ranching. Future Texas politician Jacob Kuechler married Petri's sister Marie in 1856, and became a part of the family business. Like many German immigrants to the American South, the Lungkwitz and Petri families chose not to own slaves but worked their farms themselves.
In 1852, the two families bought a 320-acre farm for $400 in the settlement of Pedernales, Texas near Fredericksburg and took up farming and cattle ranching. The families remained there until 1864, although Petri drowned in the Pedernales River in 1857. Lungkwitz continued to create paintings of the Texas Hill Country, one of his favorite subjects being Enchanted Rock, of which he painted at least six landscapes:
Iwonski moved to San Antonio in 1857 and in 1859 became associated with artist William DeRyee. Iwonski began making sketches of troops stationed in the south Texas area during the Civil War. His most famous was "The Terry's Rangers". He also became a teacher at the Bickler German-English Academy. From 1866–1870, Iwonski ran a San Antonio photography studio with fellow artist Hermann Lungkwitz. In addition to his portraits, he began painting landscapes.
Kuechler arrived in Galveston on July 4, 1847, on the ship "St. Pauli "from Hamburg. He was part of the Darmstadt free-thinker fraternity of intellectuals from the universities of Giessen and Heidelberg and the Gewerbeschule of Darmstadt. They founded the Fisher-Miller Land Grant community of Bettina, Texas after John O. Meusebach negotiated the Meusebach–Comanche Treaty in 1847. Bettina failed after the Adelsverein funding expired, and due to conflict of structure and authorities. The members dispersed to other communities, and Kuechler moved to Pedernales, Texas to take up farming and ranching with the Lungkwitz and Petri families.
The interest of his uneventful life centres within the circle of his art. As a painter Richter aimed at a thorough blending of the figure element with the landscape and may be judged by the following examples: "Harvest Procession in the Campagna" (1833) and three others in the Leipzig Museum: "Ferry at the Schreckenstein" (1836) and "Bridal Procession in Springtime" (1847), in the Dresden Gallery; "View of the Riesengebirge" (1839), in the National Gallery, Berlin. One of his most notable protégés was Hermann Lungkwitz.
Keidel relocated southwest of Fredericksburg to the banks of the Pedernales River and founded a settlement he named Pedernales. For any settlers who would relocate with him to the settlement, he agreed to give them free medical care. Keidel became the first leader of the community. Among the other early residents were photographer and landscape artist Hermann Lungkwitz and his brother-in-law and fellow painter Friedrich Richard Petri. After the Bettina community failed circa 1848, Jacob Kuechler and his wife Marie Petri Kuechler moved to Pedernales, to join the family business. By 1850 the settlement had forty-four residents of German descent.
At age fourteen, Petri was enrolled at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts where he would remain for eleven years under the tutelage and guidance of Adrian Ludwig Richter and Julius Hübner. Petri won six awards and a scholarship to a further education in Italy, upon completion of which he was to return to the Dresden institution as an instructor. Petri was unable to accept the offer due to physical frailty. Hermann Lungkwitz, who married Petri's sister Elisabeth, befriended Petri while at the Dresden academy. Petri and Lungwitz joined other students in the failed 1849 May Uprising in Dresden, an event at the tail end of the Revolutions of 1848 resulting from the refusal of Frederick Augustus II to recognize a constitutional monarchy.