Synonyms for maguirei or Related words with maguirei

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Examples of "maguirei"
Pepinia maguirei is a species in the genus "Pepinia". This species is endemic to Venezuela.
Vriesea maguirei is a species in the genus "Vriesea". This species is native to Venezuela.
Topobea maguirei is a species of plant in the Melastomataceae family. It is endemic to Ecuador.
Filistata maguirei is a species of the araneomorph spider family Filistatidae.
Brocchinia maguirei is a species in the genus "Brocchinia". This species is endemic to Venezuela.
Micropholis maguirei is a species of plant in the Sapotaceae family. It is found in Brazil and Venezuela.
Pouteria maguirei is a species of plant in the Sapotaceae family. It is found in Brazil and Venezuela.
Heisteria maguirei is a species of plant in the Olacaceae family. It is found in Brazil, Guyana, and Venezuela.
Guanchezia is a genus of terrestrial orchids. There is only one known species, Guanchezia maguirei, endemic to Venezuela.
Hypericum maguirei is a species of shrub in the family Hypericaceae. It is endemic to Ecuador, where it grows in the páramo of the Andes. It occurs at elevations between 2000 and 4000 meters.
Meriania maguirei is a species of plant in the Melastomataceae family. It is endemic to Ecuador. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland.
"Alibertia sorbilis" is a very similar species, also used with commercial purposes. Borojó de la Amazonia (Amazonas borojo), "Duroia maguirei", is a wild species in a different Rubiaceae genus, which grows up to 8m and has a smaller, edible fruit. Claes Persson (1999)
Lewisia maguirei is a rare species of flowering plant in the purslane family known by the common name Maguire's lewisia, or Maguire's bitterroot. It is endemic to Nevada in the United States, where it is known only from eastern Nye County.
Draba burkei is a species of flowering plant in the mustard family known by the common names snowbasin draba and Burke's draba. It is endemic to Utah in the United States, where it is known from Box Elder, Cache, Morgan, and Weber Counties. This plant was considered a variety of "Draba maguirei" until 2004, when it was elevated to species status.
This plant grows on vertical limestone cliffs, often in spots shaded by Douglas-fir ("Pseudotsuga menziesii"), Rocky Mountain maple ("Acer glabrum"), and bigtooth maple ("A. grandidentatum"). Other plants in the habitat include pink alumroot ("Heuchera rubescens"), mat rock spiraea ("Petrophyton caespitosum"), narrowleaf wildparsley ("Musineon lineare"), Maguire's primrose ("Primula cusickiana" var. "maguirei"), Cronquist's fleabane ("Erigeron cronquistii"), cutleaf mountain mahogany ("Cercocarpus ledifolius"), Watson's prickly phlox ("Leptodactylon watsonii"), bluebells ("Mertensia oblongifolia"), and various mosses.
Other species: the remaining species are plants about which classification consensus has not been achieved: "Bifrenaria maguirei", also classified under the genus "Guanchezia", and "Bifrenaria grandis", under "Lacaena". "Bifrenaria steyermarkii" is a species highly different from all other "Bifrenaria" because its inflorescence is very long ant its flowers highly narrow, therefore it does not fit in any group, nevertheless the only other option of classification that has been published so far is under "Xylobium" what possibly is not a choice either.
Erigeron maguirei is a species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common names Maguire daisy and Maguire's fleabane. It is endemic to Utah in the United States. It is a perennial herb growing up to tall. It grows from a taproot and a branching caudex. The stems are densely hairy. The inflorescence holds one to five flower heads each with several hairy, glandular phyllaries. The head has up to 20 white, pink-tinged, or pink ray florets 0.6 to 0.8 centimeters long, and many yellow disc florets at the center.
They collect honey of twenty species of bees and many fruits: palm fruits ("Jessenia bataua"), "Oenocarpus" spp., "Attalea" spp., "Mauritia" sp., "Phenakospermum guyannense", "Aechmea" sp., "Inga" sp., "Couma macrocarpa", "Iryanthera" sp., "Theobroma" spp., "Pourouma" spp., "Parinari" sp., "Micrandra" sp., "Helicostylis" sp., "Caryocar" sp., "Talisia" sp., "Hymenaea" sp., "Dacryodes" spp., "Abuta" sp., "Eugenia" spp., "Touraleia" sp., "Perebea" spp., "Protium" sp., "Cecropia" sp., 'Batocarpus" sp., "Hyeronima" sp., "Brosimum" sp., "Dialium" sp., "Garcinia" sp., "Manilkara" sp., "Naucleopsis" spp., "Pradosia" sp., "Pouteria" sp., "Salasia" sp., "Passiflora" spp., "Duroia maguirei", "Duroia hirsuta", "Mouriri" sp., "Alibertia" sp..
This species was previously divided into two varieties. The rare var. "maguirei" was federally listed as an endangered species in 1985 because there were only five to seven individual plants known, all growing in an area with active uranium mining claims. By 1996, studies indicated that the differences between the two varieties were not controlled by the genes of the plants, so that the division of the species into varieties was not warranted. The two varieties were combined, so both would be considered together under the Endangered Species Act as one species. This automatically made the endangered taxon more abundant than before, and it was downlisted to threatened status. Recent counts suggest there are ten populations containing over 160,000 individuals. The United States Fish and Wildlife Service's target for recovery was set at around 10,000 individuals, so the Service considers the plant to have recovered. In 2011 it was removed from the Endangered Species List.
"Helianthus eggertii" was originally listed as an endangered species by the US federal government in 1997 under the Endangered Species Act. A number of conservation measures were therefore instituted to protect the species. The mowing of roadside verges that contain "H. eggertii" is delayed until after November 15 each year to allow the plant to set seed before it is mown. Utility companies manage the woody brush under their power lines by mechanical pruning, rather than using herbicides, and this is also carried out late in the season. In 2005, "H eggertii" was delisted after research showed that although there were few populations of "H. eggertii", they were increasing in size. , "H. eggertii" is one of only four plant species to have been delisted under the Endangered Species Act as a result of the species' recovery; the others are "Potentilla robbinsiana" (Robbins' cinquefoil), "Erigeron maguirei" (Maguire daisy), and "Echinacea tennesseensis" (Tennessee purple coneflower).