Synonyms for malacothrix or Related words with malacothrix

pectis              sonorae              adenostoma              bolanderi              cistanthe              arizonicus              brevifolium              lepidota              piptochaetium              verbesina              connata              ramulosa              breviflora              gutierrezia              sessiliflora              peduncularis              arbuscula              lyonia              anomalum              tenuifolium              desertdandelion              laevigatum              insulare              vulpia              trichostema              tenellum              fouquieria              capitellata              cercidium              lappula              setigera              filipes              hirtella              hackelia              tenellus              brachythecium              cuneifolia              ciliatum              mucronata              hymenoxys              caespitosa              multiradiata              intertexta              campanulata              stephanomeria              pulvinata              stylocline              microcephala              revolutum              setacea             



Examples of "malacothrix"
The larvae feed on "Malacothrix glabrata" and "Rafinesquia neomexicana".
The gerbil mouse ("Malacothrix typica") is a species of rodent in the family Nesomyidae.
"Malacothrix junakii" is a rare species of aster known by the common names Anacapa Island desert-dandelion, Junak's desert dandelion and Junak's malacothrix that is endemic to Anacapa, where it is known from just two occurrences. It occurs in the coastal scrub of the island and was described to science as a new species in 1997.
Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that "Malacothrix" is not monophyletic. Some of its species are related to "Atrichoseris", whereas a second group is more closely related to "Anisocoma" and "Calycoseris".
More broadly, the clade "Delanymys" belongs to ("Delanymys" + ("Mystromys" + "Petromyscus")) was sister to Dendromurinae ("Steatomys" + ("Dendromus" + "Malacothrix")) and Cricetomyinae ("Saccostomus" + ("Beamys" + "Cricetomys")).
Malacothrix junakii is a rare species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common names Anacapa Island desert-dandelion, Junak's desertdandelion, and Junak's malacothrix. It is endemic to Anacapa Island, one of the Channel Islands of California, where it is known from just two occurrences. It occurs in the coastal scrub of the island. It was described to science as a new species in 1997.
Malacothrix sonchoides is a species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common names sowthistle desertdandelion and yellow saucers. It is native to much of the western United States, where it grows in sandy substrates in habitat such as Joshua tree woodland, grassland, creosote bush scrub, and ephedra-blackbrush communities.
Malacothrix is a genus of plants in the dandelion tribe within the sunflower family. They are known generally as desert dandelions or desertdandelions. Most are native to western North America although a few have been introduced to South America. Several are found only on offshore islands in the Pacific.
Twoleaf nightshades can sometimes be confused with the Jerusalem cherry ("Solanum pseudocapsicum"), another nightshade grown for its brightly colored berries, various synonyms of which were once classified as its cultivars. Perhaps, the closest resemblance of twoleaf nightshades within the genus is a rare species in western Mexico, "Solanum malacothrix".
Malacothrix glabrata (smooth desert dandelion or desert dandelion) is an annual plant in the sunflower family (Asteraceae). It is common to the southwestern deserts of North America and has showy pale-yellow to white flowers. The name "glabrata" refers to the leaves being (nearly) hairless. Like other members of its genus, it has a milky sap and flower heads composed of smaller strap-like flowers called "ligules".
Malacothrix saxatilis is a species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common names cliff desertdandelion or cliff aster. It is endemic to California, where it grows in the central and southern coastal hills and mountain ranges. It is a perennial herb growing 30 to 60 centimeters tall from a rhizome and caudex unit. The leaves are variable in size and shape and may be lobed or not. The inflorescence is an array of flower heads lined with lance-shaped phyllaries. The ray florets are 1 or 2 centimeters long and white in color.
Malacothrix floccifera is a species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common name woolly desertdandelion. It is native to many of the northern and central mountain ranges of California, including the Sierra Nevada, where its distribution extends into Nevada. Its habitat includes forest, woodland, and chaparral. It is an annual herb producing a hairless flowering stem up to about 42 centimeters in maximum height. The fleshy oblong leaves are cut into teeth or lobes and have cottony patches of woolly fibers. The inflorescence is an array of flower heads lined with hairless phyllaries. The ray florets are up to 1.5 centimeters long and are often white, but sometimes yellow.
Malacothrix californica is a species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common name California desertdandelion. It is native to California and Baja California, where it can be found in many types of dry mountain, desert, and valley habitat. It is an annual herb producing a flowering stem up to about 45 centimeters in maximum height. The toothed linear to lance-shaped leaves are mostly located around the base of the plant. The inflorescence is an array of flower heads lined with hairy phyllaries. The head bears rings of ray florets 1 or 2 centimeters long, usually yellow in color, sometimes white.
Malacothrix stebbinsii is a species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common name Stebbins' desertdandelion. It is native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico where it grows in deserts, scrub, and woodlands. It is an annual herb producing a hairless stem up to about 60 centimeters in maximum height. The leaves are lined with narrow lobes. The inflorescence is an array of flower heads with ray florets under a centimeter long and white to light yellow in color.
Malacothrix squalida is a rare species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common name Santa Cruz desertdandelion. It is endemic to Santa Cruz and Anacapa Islands, two of the eight Channel Islands of California, where it grows on rocky seaside bluffs and cliffs. The plant is very limited in distribution and today exists only in degraded habitat on these two small islands. It was last collected from Santa Cruz Island in 1968, and two populations were noted on Anacapa Island in 1998; in drought years there may be no plants at all. It became a federally listed endangered species in 1997. This is an annual herb growing a hairless, waxy stem 20 to 30 centimeters in maximum height. The leaves are sharply lobed. The inflorescence is an array of flower heads lined with oval-shaped phyllaries. The ray florets are 1 to 2 centimeters and light yellow in color.
Malacothrix coulteri is a species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common name snake's head, or snake's head desertdandelion. It is native to the southwestern United States is also found in southern South America where it is an introduced species. Its native habitat includes desert, grassland, chaparral, and other open, sandy areas. It is an annual herb producing a waxy, upright flowering stem up to about 50 centimeters in maximum height. The leaves, which are mostly located near the base of the stem, are toothed or not. The inflorescence is an array of flower heads with nearly spherical involucres of scale-like phyllaries one to two centimeters wide. The bracts are green, often with dark striping or marking. The yellow or white ray florets are about a centimeter long.
Malacothrix clevelandii is a species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common name Cleveland's desertdandelion. It is native to parts of the southwestern United States and Baja California, where it can be found most often in chaparral, including cleared and disturbed areas such as slopes recently burned by wildfire. The plant is also found in southern South America where it is an introduced species. It is an annual herb producing a flowering stem up to about 35 centimeters in maximum height. The toothed leaves are largest at the base of the plant, and reduced farther up. The inflorescence is an array of flower heads each bearing rings of pale yellow ray florets roughly half a centimeter long.
Malacothrix incana is an uncommon species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common name dunedelion. It is endemic to California, where it grows only in sand dunes on the beaches of the Channel Islands and isolated spots along the mainland coastline in San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties. The type specimen was collected in San Diego, but the plant no longer occurs there. This is a perennial herb forming a leafy mound up to about 70 centimeters in maximum height. It may be hairless to densely hairy. The leaves are smooth-edged or have dull lobes. Leaves at the base of the stem are similar to those distal. The inflorescence is an array of flower heads lined with hairless phyllaries. The ray florets are one or two centimeters long and yellow in color.
Malacothrix indecora is a rare species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common name Santa Cruz Island desertdandelion. It is endemic to the Channel Islands of California, where it is known from only a few populations on three of the eight islands. As of 2000, there were three occurrences on San Miguel Island, two on Santa Rosa Island, and one on Santa Cruz Island. It grows on the bluffs and rocky coastal grasslands of the islands. Like many Channel Islands endemics, this plant is naturally limited in distribution and has been threatened by the presence of destructive introduced mammals, in this case, feral pigs. The plant became a federally listed endangered species in 1997. This is a mat-forming annual herb which spreads low to the ground no more than about 10 centimeters high. The fleshy leaves have dull lobes. The inflorescence is an array of flower heads lined with oval-shaped phyllaries. The ray florets are under a centimeter long and yellow in color.