Synonyms for malolo or Related words with malolo

lailai              yanuca              eroni              onotoa              mataiva              nanuya              nonouti              hunga              nilandhe              hihifo              kaimana              dublon              saparua              fakarava              aniwa              levuka              tambak              sangir              dauan              biuku              kumana              aranuka              takapoto              tabiteuea              rangiroa              tikehau              manihi              puhi              manutuke              kepulauan              napuka              poulo              mahina              tawake              somosomo              matuku              mataika              saibai              tofua              kadavu              ngulu              ngapali              enua              langi              pangkajene              pahala              magur              cicia              krueng              atka             



Examples of "malolo"
Malolo Island is accessible by boat or through the nearby Malolo Lailai Airport.
Malolo Lailai (Little Malolo), also known as Plantation Island, is the second largest and most developed of the Mamanuca Islands, lying 20 kilometres west of Nadi on Fiji's main island Viti Levu. Malolo Lailai is the centre of tourism in the Mamanuca Islands, and consists of four resorts, a number of residential houses, a marina and a golf course. The island can be reached in 50 minutes from Port Denarau by the "Malolo Cat", a catamaran, or by Malolo Lailai Airport, a 10-minute flight from Nadi International Airport. Separated by a small isthmus which can be walked at low tide, the larger island of Malolo Levu lies north-west of Malolo Lailai.
Rt. Rev. Tepa and May Faleto'ese FT (Matua Malolo)
Malolo is an inhabited volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean, near Fiji.
Malolo Lailai Airport is an airport on the Malolo Lailai island in the Fiji's Western Division. The airport is a short strip running the width of the island, and is mainly used for general aviation and transporting guests to resorts on the island, such as Musket Cove Resort, Lomani Island Resort and Plantation Island Resort.
The critically small population on Malolo Levu seems to be an intermediate of Brachylophus vitiensis and Brachylophus bulabula likely resulting from hybridism in the past. The main habitat of this small population on Malolo has recently been reduced to a fraction by the Vunabaka project which in 2014 bulldozed the vast majority of its stronghold dry forest remnant. According to Steve Anstey of Ahura Resorts there currently only are 15 unique Iguanas left in the forest remnants at Likuliku Lodge, 6 at Malolo Resort and 17 remaining in the highly degraded remnants at Vunabaka, which likely will disappear altogether.
SS "Malolo" (later known as "Matsonia", "Atlantic", and "Queen Frederica") was an American ocean liner and cruise ship built by William Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia in 1926 for the Matson Line. She was the first of a number of ships designed by William Francis Gibbs for the line, which did much to develop tourism in the Hawaiian Islands. In 1927 Matson commissioned its largest ship yet, the "Malolo" (flying fish) for the first-class luxury service between San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Honolulu. The "Malolo" and other Matson liners advertised superb public rooms, spacious cabins, swimming pools, a gymnasium, and a staff, including a hairdresser, to provide a high standard of service.
Mtinko itself is a small town probably 4000 population. Mtinko ward comprises several villages. The villages are: Kijota, Ikiwu, Minyenye, Mpambaa, Malolo, Matumbo, Mpipiti and Mudida.
Obed Malolo (born 18 April 1997) is a Finnish football player currently playing for HJK. He is of Congolese (DRC) descent.
"Malolo" introduced improved safety standards which influenced all subsequent American passenger liners. On 25 May 1927 while on her sea trials in the western Atlantic, she collided with SS "Jacob Christensen", a Norwegian freighter, with an impact equal to that when struck an iceberg and sank 15 years earlier. "Malolo"s advanced watertight compartments allowed her to stay afloat and sail into New York Harbor flooded with over 7,000 tons of sea water in her hull.
Malolo was one of the locations visited by members the United States Exploring Expedition under Charles Wilkes in 1840. During the visit, two members of the party, including Midshipman Wilkes Henry, Wilkes' nephew, were killed by natives as they attempted to negotiate for food. In retaliation, sixty crewmen from the Expedition's ships attacked and destroyed the villages of Sualib and Arro on Malolo; they also laid waste to all of the crops and huts located in between the two.
The name "Malalas" probably derived from the ܱAramaic word (ܡܰܠܳܠܰܐ "malolo") for "rhetor", "orator"; it is first applied to him by John of Damascus. The form "Malelas" is later, first appearing in Constantine VII.
Later he traveled to New York City, painting dramatic views of Hawaii for the new steamers Haleakala and Malolo of the Inter-Island Steam Navigation Company. During the late 1920s, his style became more impressionistic.
Nadroga-Navosa includes the districts of Cuvu, Nasigatoka, Tuva, Malomalo, Wai, Malolo, Naqalimare, Namataku, Noikoro, Conua, Raviravi, Nokonoko, Waicoba, Mavua, Bemana, Navatusila, Koroinasau, Komave, Korolevu I Wai, Nasikawa, Nadrau, and Vatulele. The population is dispersed between the coastal and hinterlands, although major economic activity is focused more toward the coast where tourism and sugar are important sources of income.
The Northern Sharks is a former Fijian rugby union team that had a franchise area coverering Nadroga-Navosa, Namosi, Serua and Malolo. The team played in Fiji's premier rugby union competition the Colonial Cup from 2004 to 2008, winning the champioshup title three times before the competition ceased in 2008.
In 1937, Matson docked "Malolo" for a major refit. The lifeboats were moved two decks higher and the deck they vacated was enclosed to create additional berths including new "Lanai Suites". Existing cabins were greatly upgraded; the ship changed from a combination of 457 first class and 163 cabin class accommodations to 693 first class only. The transformed ship was rechristened "Matsonia".
The design began to be incorporated elsewhere, as seen in the U.S. built "SS Malolo", "SS President Hoover" and "SS President Coolidge" passenger liners launched in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Still the idea was largely viewed as experimental by many ship builders and owners.
Departing Hampton Roads on 18 August 18, 1838, the expedition stopped at Madeira and Rio de Janeiro, Argentina; visited Tierra del Fuego, Chile, Peru, the Tuamotu Archipelago, Samoa, and New South Wales. From Sydney, Australia, the fleet sailed into the Antarctic Ocean in December 1839 and reported the discovery "of an Antarctic continent west of the Balleny Islands" of which it sighted the coast on January 25, 1840. Next, the expedition visited Fiji and the Hawaiian Islands in 1840. In July 1840, two sailors, one of whom was Wilkes' nephew, Midshipman Wilkes Henry, were killed while bartering for food on Malolo, in Fiji. Wilkes retribution was swift and severe. According to an old man of Malolo Island, nearly 80 Fijians were killed in the incident.
Departing from Hampton Roads on August 18, 1838, the expedition stopped at the Madeira Islands and Rio de Janeiro; visited Tierra del Fuego, Chile, Peru, the Tuamotu Archipelago, Samoa, and New South Wales; from Sydney, Australia sailed into the Antarctic Ocean in December 1839 and reported the discovery "of an Antarctic continent west of the Balleny Islands" of which it sighted the coast on January 25, 1840. Next the expedition visited Fiji and the Hawaiian Islands. In Fiji, the expedition kidnapped the chief Ro Veidovi, charging him with the murder of a crew of American whalers. And, in July 1840, two sailors, one of whom was Wilkes' nephew, Midshipman Wilkes Henry, were killed while bartering for food on Fiji's Malolo Island. Wilkes retribution was swift and severe. According to an old man of Malolo Island, nearly 80 Fijians were killed in the incident.
Born in Honolulu, Hawaii, December 6, 1914, Mamo Clark sailed to the mainland United States on the SS "Malolo" on July 1, 1933 with her stepmother May Kaaolani Clark and father Joseph Kealakaimana Clark. Her stepmother was the daughter of John Adams Cummins. Her biological mother was Evelina Mahoe. Both her mother and stepmother were descendants of 15th-century Hawaiian chief Liloa and distant relatives of Kamehameha I.