Synonyms for manova or Related words with manova

anovas              nonparametric              scheffe              rmanova              kruskall              homoscedastic              mcnemar              biometrika              univariate              heteroscedastic              mmrm              ancova              posthoc              dunnet              tukey              dunett              kruskal              biweight              tukeys              multicomparison              anov              bonferonni              logrank              wald              mancova              biostatistical              posttest              chisquare              ranksum              bonferoni              permanova              homoscedasticity              spearman              dunnetts              dunnett              lowess              intraclass              wilcoxon              plsd              intergroup              keuls              plsda              bisquare              technometrics              bonferronni              anova              multivariate              unifrac              bivariate              posttests             



Examples of "manova"
In multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) the following equation applies
Measures: Exact Methods in MANOVA and Mixed Models. Wiley, Hoboken, New Jersey, 2004.
Analogous to ANOVA, MANOVA is based on the product of model variance matrix, formula_1 and
This differs from standard MANOVA by the addition of C, a "postmatrix".
MANOVA is based on the product of model variance matrix, formula_1 and inverse of the error variance matrix, formula_2, or formula_3. The hypothesis that formula_4 implies that the product formula_5. Invariance considerations imply the MANOVA statistic should be a measure of magnitude of the singular value decomposition of this matrix product, but there is no unique choice owing to the multi-dimensional nature of the alternative hypothesis.
Moreover, it is a useful follow-up procedure to a MANOVA instead of doing a series of one-way ANOVAs, for ascertaining how the groups differ on the composite of dependent variables. In this case, a significant F test allows classification based on a linear combination of predictor variables. Terminology can get confusing here, as in MANOVA, the dependent variables are the predictor variables, and the independent variables are the grouping variables.
MANOVA is a generalized form of univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA), although, unlike univariate ANOVA, it uses the covariance between outcome variables in testing the statistical significance of the mean differences.
The assumptions of discriminant analysis are the same as those for MANOVA. The analysis is quite sensitive to outliers and the size of the smallest group must be larger than the number of predictor variables.
StatPlus is a software product for basic univariate and multivariate statistical analysis (MANOVA, GLM, Latin squares), as well as time series analysis, nonparametric statistics, survival analysis and statistical charts including control charts.
The growth curve model in statistics is a specific multivariate linear model, also known as GMANOVA (Generalized Multivariate ANalysis-Of-VAriance). It generalizes MANOVA by allowing post-matrices, as seen in the definition.
In statistics, Wilks's lambda distribution (named for Samuel S. Wilks), is a probability distribution used in multivariate hypothesis testing, especially with regard to the likelihood-ratio test and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA).
Another alternative procedure is using the multivariate test statistics (MANOVA) since they do not require the assumption of sphericity. However, this procedure can be less powerful than using a repeated measures ANOVA, especially when sphericity violation is not large or sample sizes are small. O’Brien and Kaiser suggested that when you have a large violation of sphericity (i.e., epsilon < .70) and your sample size is greater than "k" + 10 (i.e., the number of levels of the repeated measures factor + 10), then a MANOVA is more powerful; in other cases, repeated measures design should be selected. Additionally, the power of MANOVA is contingent upon the correlations between the dependent variables, so the relationship between the different conditions must also be considered.
Discriminant function analysis is a statistical analysis to predict a categorical dependent variable (called a grouping variable) by one or more continuous or binary independent variables (called predictor variables). The original dichotomous discriminant analysis was developed by Sir Ronald Fisher in 1936. It is different from an ANOVA or MANOVA, which is used to predict one (ANOVA) or multiple (MANOVA) continuous dependent variables by one or more independent categorical variables. Discriminant function analysis is useful in determining whether a set of variables is effective in predicting category membership.
In statistics, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) is a procedure for comparing multivariate sample means. As a multivariate procedure, it is used when there are two or more dependent variables, and is typically followed by significance tests involving individual dependent variables separately. It helps to answer
inverse of the error variance matrix, formula_2, or formula_3. The hypothesis that formula_4 implies that the product formula_5. Invariance considerations imply the MANOVA statistic should be a measure of magnitude of the singular value decomposition of this matrix product, but there is no unique choice owing to the multi-dimensional nature of the alternative hypothesis.
The general linear model incorporates a number of different statistical models: ANOVA, ANCOVA, MANOVA, MANCOVA, ordinary linear regression, t-test and F-test. The general linear model is a generalization of multiple linear regression model to the case of more than one dependent variable. If Y, B, and U were column vectors, the matrix equation above would represent multiple linear regression.
In statistics, path analysis is used to describe the directed dependencies among a set of variables. This includes models equivalent to any form of multiple regression analysis, factor analysis, canonical correlation analysis, discriminant analysis, as well as more general families of models in the multivariate analysis of variance and covariance analyses (MANOVA, ANOVA, ANCOVA).
ProStat is the sister software to PSI-Plot. The differences between the two software are generally in extent or depth of a tool class rather than presence or absence. ANOVA in PSI-Plot becomes ANOVA, ANCOVA and MANOVA in ProStat, while the range of plot types in ProStat is extended in PSI-Plot by the addition of options such as Pareto charts, Smith curves, ternary, vector, and column plots. FFT is available in both, but extended differently according to the emphases of the different target users.
StatView 2 was called "StatView SE + Graphics". It included ANOVA with one repeated-measure and, remarkably, a factor analysis. In StatView 4, the user approach changed from touching the to-be-analyzed data in the spreadsheet to clicking on column names in a separate window. This lack of immediacy was compensated for by an increase in the number of statistical tests that could be performed and in the power of existing tests. For example, multiway repeated-measures factors could be included in ANOVAs, with the only limit being the memory allocated to the application. There were ANCOVA and MANOVA too. StatView 4 also became available for PCs.
Conventional statistical methods do not provide exact solutions to many statistical problems, such as those arising in mixed models and MANOVA, especially when the problem involves a number of nuisance parameters. As a result, practitioners often resort to approximate statistical methods or asymptotic statistical methods that are valid only when the sample size is large. With small samples, such methods often have poor performance. Use of approximate and asymptotic methods may lead to misleading conclusions or may fail to detect truly significant results from experiments.