Synonyms for melodyne or Related words with melodyne

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Examples of "melodyne"
As of January 2016, the current release is Melodyne 4. Artists who use the software include Herbie Hancock, Coldplay, Peter Gabriel, and Thomas Newman. It is also used in classical music for the pitch analysis of speech. Composer Jonathan Harvey and IRCAM engineers used Melodyne to extract melodic material for his composition "Speakings".
Melodyne also has facilities for time-stretching, rebuilding melodies. It can also be used to aid the creation of backing vocals from an existing lead vocal. The first public viewing of Melodyne was at the Winter NAMM Show in 2001 and it has since won various awards.
Melodyne has become a tool which is used by a large number of professional record producers worldwide to tune and manipulate audio signals, typically a singer's vocals.
Three years before Celemony was founded, Peter Neubäcker was working on a research experiment with sound. This experiment later turned into the Melodyne pitch correction product.
In 2010, producer Teddy Riley claimed that the processing of Michael Jackson's voice with Melodyne caused fans to question the authenticity of the voice on the posthumous album "Michael". Riley claimed that because he did not have a "final vocal" from Jackson, Melodyne had to be used "to make his voice work with the actual music," "to get him in key" and this resulted in the vibrato sounding "a little off" or "over-processed."
The latest technology by Celemony is DNA Direct Note Access, which allows independent manipulation of individual notes within chords and polyphonic recordings. Originally announced at Musikmesse Frankfurt 2008 to be released at the end of that year, it was later postponed to Q1 2009, then finally released on November 16, 2009 as part of Melodyne editor. On January 14, 2016, Celemony integrated DNA into their multitrack software Melodyne studio (version 4).
Celemony Software GmbH is a German musical software company that specializes in digital audio pitch correction software. It produces Melodyne, a popular audio pitch modification tool similar to Auto-Tune.
In 2009, Melodyne won an MIPA Award for Most innovative product. In 2011, Celemony released Capstan, a stand-alone audio restoration software that eliminates wow and flutter from digital recordings.
According to an interview in "Future Music" magazine (issue 229), the track was composed in Logic using various plug-ins. Pharrell's vocals were heavily processed in Melodyne and the final track was mixed and mastered at Metropolis Studios London on an SSL console.
Pitman has also done sound design and electronic work for Arturia software synthesizers, A Designs Audio [Peter Montessi], Waves Plugins, Waldorf Synthesizers, Apple's Logic Audio, Digidesign Plugins, Moog Synthesizers, Celemony's Melodyne, Ableton Live, Roland USA, Korg Music, Serge Synthesis [SMS], PlanB Synthesis [Peter Grenader], [Axel Hartmann] Neuron Synthesis, and Symbolic Sounds Kyma, Mandala Drums, Steven Slate Drums, Native Instruments.
Yandel's voice was recorded using two Neve 1073 preamplifiers, a Vocoder Korg voice codec, a Solid-State Channel Strip preamplifier, The Mouth software by Native Instruments and Melodyne software. As well as on his previous studio album, his voice was multitracked on all songs and also has some delays.
ARA Audio Random Access is an extension for audio plug-in interfaces like AU, VST and RTAS developed by Celemony together with PreSonus. With ARA, the DAW and plug-in can exchange information about the audio file, tempo, pitch, and rhythm, not only in the moment of playback but for the whole song. The transfer of audio material to Melodyne isn't required anymore.
ARA was published in 2011. Melodyne editor, assistant and essential (Version 1.3 or later) are ARA-compatible. The first DAWs that implement ARA are PreSonus Studio One (Version 2 or later), Cakewalk Sonar (Version X3 and later) and Samplitude Pro X (Version 3 and later). To allow other DAW manufacturers to support ARA, a Software Development Kit has been published by Celemony.
The Scala scale file format has become a standard for representing microtonal scales in a way that can be used by other software. The Scala site lists over thirty applications that support the format, including several major commercial packages like Apple Logic 7, Celemony Melodyne 3, and Cakewalk Rapture. Scala's developer also makes freely available an archive of over 4,000 Scala scale files, containing many musical scales of historical, cultural, and theoretical interest.
Tracktion 5 has hundreds of new features, including ARA integration for Celemony Software’s Melodyne, rapid audio comping, track presets and much more. T5’s revolutionary ‘Edit Clip’ format allows users to embed multi-track material as if it were a single audio clip; while allowing the source material to be edited.It also includes a greatly enhanced set of MIDI capabilities. The piano-roll editor has also been overhauled to include a raft of new features such as “Per-note Automation” and rapid “MIDI Learn” for easy integration with hardware controllers. There is even support for next-generation instruments such as ROLI’s Seaboard with MDC (multi-dimensional control).
"Studio One Professional" is the top of the line. PreSonus intends it for professional-level music production. It features multitrack audio and MIDI recording, and an integrated mastering and Red Book CD authoring suite. Studio One Professional includes video playback and synchronization, and fully licensed Melodyne essential pitch correction. The top three Studio One versions feature unlimited audio, MIDI and instrument tracks, buses, and effects channels. They provide 26 PreSonus effects, four instruments, automation, latency compensation, 32-bit or 64-bit processing, real-time timestretching and—in the Pro version—Audio Unit, ReWire, and VST support (including VST3).
Auto-Tune is still widely used, as are other pitch-correction algorithms including Celemony's Direct Note Access which allows adjustment of individual notes in a polyphonic audio signal, and Celemony's Melodyne. Pitch correction is now a common feature in digital audio editing software, having first appeared as a Pro Tools plugin and now being found in products such as Apple GarageBand, Apple Logic Pro, Adobe Audition, FL Studio, Digital Performer, and Steinberg Cubase. MorphTune also provides this functionality. It is also available in the form of rackmount hardware, such as the TC-Helicon VoiceOne. There is also a large stompbox pedal that provides pitch correction in a small device that could be used at a show by plugging the vocal microphone into the pedal and then sending the signal to the PA system. A free VST plugin known as GSnap can also be used to get the same effect. In the Linux FOSS community, Autotalent and Zita-AT1 offer this functionality.
In 2008, Jason Brown, a mathematics professor at Dalhousie University, published a report titled "Mathematics, Physics and 'A Hard Day's Night'", in which he analysed the properties of the song's opening chord using Fourier transforms. He concluded that Martin's piano contribution provided the important element in the chord beside Harrison's playing. In November the following year, "Wired" published an article on Brown's use of Celemony's Melodyne Editor with Direct Note Access technology to further analyse the chord. Brown's findings were partly challenged in 2012 by another mathematician, Kevin Houston from the University of Leeds. Houston, who also used a Fourier transform, attributed a greater importance in Lennon's contribution on acoustic guitar, rather than the piano notes played by Martin.
In a statement before the premiere of "Breaking News", Sony Music Group countered that it had "complete confidence in the results of our extensive research, as well as the accounts of those who were in the studio with Michael, that the vocals on the new album are his own". Producer Riley, Frank DiLeo and Jackson's estate defended Sony's claims that the song is authentic. On December 6, 2010, the Cascio family appeared on "Oprah", where Eddie Cascio insisted the songs were sung by Jackson, and showed the studio where he had allegedly recorded the songs. Riley, who had worked on two of the Cascio tracks, "Monster" and "Breaking News", said that he had to do "more processing to the voice, which is why people were asking about the authenticity of his voice". Riley also said that "With the Melodyne we actually move the stuff up which is the reason why some of the vibrato sounds a little off or processed, over-processed. We truly apologize for that happening, but you are still hearing the true Michael Jackson". Almost three years after the album release, in September 2013, Riley apologized on Twitter for his work on the Cascio tracks and claimed that his participation in the project had been "set up".
The authenticity of "Monster" has been questioned. Doubts over whether the vocals were actually by Jackson have been raised, reportedly by Katherine Jackson and Jackson's two eldest children and many of his fans. His brother Randy Jackson posted a series of messages about the album on his Twitter account stating that family members were not allowed at his studio where the album was being completed. According to Randy, when engineer Teddy Riley played him some of the tracks, "I immediately said it wasn't his voice". In a statement, Sony Music Group countered that it had "complete confidence in the results of our extensive research, as well as the accounts of those who were in the studio with Michael, that the vocals on the new album are his own". Producer Teddy Riley, Frank DiLeo and Jackson's estate have since defended Sony's claims that the song is authentic. Teddy Riley who worked on the songs "Hollywood Tonight", "Monster" and "Breaking News", claimed that he had to do "more processing to the voice, which is why people were asking about the authenticity of his voice". Riley also claimed that "With the Melodyne we actually move the stuff up which is the reason why some of the vibrato sounds a little off or processed, over-processed. We truly apologize for that happening, but you are still hearing the true Michael Jackson".