Synonyms for monofins or Related words with monofins

monofin              wetsuits              paddler              kitesurfers              kickboards              paddleboards              kiteboards              wakeskating              wakeboarding              swimfins              surfboards              bodyboards              kneeboards              sailboards              snorkels              snorkeling              kiteboarding              bodyboard              waterskiing              paddling              paddleboard              kayaks              windsurfers              surfcraft              snowshoes              sidestroke              snorkelers              wakeboarders              kickboard              snorkeler              kayakers              drysuit              kneeboarding              boardshorts              sunbathing              footstraps              freediving              kitesurfing              wakesurfing              snowboarders              canoeists              paddlers              kiteboard              hydroplanes              sailboarding              paddleboarding              bodyboarding              shortboards              bodysurfing              anguilliform             



Examples of "monofins"
Most styles of fin can be used with the frog-kick. Only monofins are totally unsuitable.
For safety reasons, it is recommended that beginners not create their own monofins from scratch. Some materials that have been used in monofins, such as acrylic or plexiglas, have shattered under hydraulic stress and have caused severe injury. Plastic polycarbonate is also not recommended, as it will crack and snap under pressure, rendering the monofin useless.
Monofins are carefully chosen when a tail is commissioned, taking into account the swimmer's ability, location of use, and desired look in the water. For instance, a large, stiff fiberglass monofin will serve a mermaid well in strong ocean currents, giving them speed and strength in the water. A mermaid who will be performing in a glass tank may choose a smaller, more flexible, plastic model, which imparts agility and graceful flow rather than strong propulsion. Some mermaids prefer to sand, cut, or otherwise alter their monofins into a preferred shape to suit their individual purposes; others prefer to create their monofins from scratch rather than purchase or alter an already existing model.
To differentiate between the use of monofins and conventional fins, the latter are sometimes referred to as stereo fins or bi-fins.
Monofins were introduced in 1972 by a Soviet finswimming club and have been used for finswimming competitions since, allowing monofin swimmers to reach speeds of 12 km/h.
Monofins can be made of glass fiber, carbon fiber or aluminum and rubber. The diver's muscle power, swimming style, and the type of aquatic activity the monofin is used for determining the choice of size, stiffness, and materials.
The vast majority of fins come as a pair, one fin is worn on each foot. This arrangement is also called bifins, to distinguish it from monofins. A monofin is typically used in finswimming and free-diving and it consists of a single fin blade attached to twin foot pockets for both the diver's feet. Monofins and long bifin blades can be made of glass fibre or carbon fibre composites. The diver's muscle power and swimming style, and the type of activity the fins are used for, determine the choice of size, stiffness, and materials.
Most monofins consist of a single, wide, glass or carbon fiber reinforced composite blade with graded flexibility attached to the diver by two rubber foot pockets. The leading edge may be thickened and faired. The blade flexibility is generally controlled by tapering the amount of fibre and thickness of the blade to make the trailing edge thinner and more flexible.
Interest in mermaid costuming has grown alongside the popularity of fantasy cosplay as well as the availability of inexpensive monofins used in the construction of mermaid costumes. These costumes are typically designed to be used while swimming, in an activity known as mermaiding. Mermaid fandom conventions have also been held.
Swimfins help the wearer to move through water more efficiently, as human feet are too small and inappropriately shaped to provide much thrust, especially when the wearer is carrying equipment that increases hydrodynamic drag. Very long fins and monofins used by freedivers as a means of underwater propulsion do not require high frequency leg movement. This improves efficiency and helps to minimize oxygen consumption. Short, stiff-bladed fins are effective for short bursts of acceleration and maneuvering, and are useful for bodysurfing.
Apart from requiring the use of a mask for protection of the eyes and for the ability to see underwater, the international rules have no requirements regarding selection. Centre-mounted snorkels (also known as front snorkels) are the only type approved for use subject to meeting minimum and maximum sizes. Fins are also regulated by the international rules. Monofins have a maximum size which can be checked by the use of a template while bi-fins must be one of the brands certified (i.e. homologated) by CMAS.
The equipment used in this sport has evolved since the sport’s creation in order to improve competitor performance. Firstly, all of the scuba equipment and instruments are now usually mounted together in a housing to create a streamlined form that can be held in front of the competitor to reduce resistance whilst swimming underwater and with a bracket to locate the instruments in front of the competitor allowing use whilst swimming and navigating the event courses. Secondly, competitors use monofins in order to move faster underwater.
Finswimming is an underwater sport consisting of four techniques involving swimming with the use of fins either on the water's surface using a snorkel using either monofins or bifins (i.e. one fin for each foot) or underwater with monofin either by holding one's breathe or underwater using open circuit scuba diving equipment. Events exist over distances similar to swimming competitions for both swimming pool and open water venues. Competition at world and continental level is organised by CMAS. The sport's first world championship was held in 1976. It also has been featured at the World Games as a trend sport since 1981 and was demonstrated at the 2013 Summer Universiade in July 2013.
Surface swimming (also known by its acronym, SF) is swimming on the surface of water using mask, snorkel and monofins. SF races are held for distances of 50, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1500, 4 × 100 relay and 4 × 200 relay (metres) in swimming pools and over various long distances in the open water environment. Swimmers must remain on the surface of the water at all times for the duration of the race except when starting or make a turns at the end of a swimming pool where an immersion over a distance of 15m is permitted.
A monofin is a type of swimfin typically used in underwater sports such as finswimming, free-diving and underwater orienteering, and in recreational freediving. It consists of a single surface attached to footpockets for both of the diver's feet. First introduced in 1972 by a Ukrainian finswimming club, they have become popular with the mermaiding community due to excellent propulsion during swimming and their realistically mermaidish silhouette. Monofins can be made of glass fiber or carbon fiber. The swimmer's muscle power, swimming style, and the type of aquatic activity the monofin is used for determines the choice of size, stiffness, and materials.
Constant weight (CWT) is a freediving discipline recognised by the AIDA International (International Association for Development of Apnea) in which the freediver descends and ascends using his fins/monofin and/or with the use of his arms without pulling on the rope or changing his ballast; only a single hold of the rope to stop the descent and start the ascent is allowed. Constant weight is the common sportive depth discipline of freediving, because of the specific fins or monofins used in it. Constant weight is one of the three disciplines considered for international competition, with static apnea and dynamic with fins.
Finswimming is an underwater sport consisting of four techniques involving swimming with the use of fins either on the water's surface using a snorkel with either monofins or bifins (i.e. one fin for each foot) or underwater with monofin either by holding one's breath or using open circuit scuba diving equipment. Events exist over distances similar to swimming competitions for both swimming pool and open water venues. Competition at world and continental level is organised by the Confédération Mondiale des Activités Subaquatiques (CMAS). The sport's first world championship was held in 1976. It also has been featured at the World Games as a trend sport since 1981 and was demonstrated at the 2015 European Games in June 2015.
Bi-fins (also known by its acronym, BF or as 'stereo-fins') is swimming on the surface of water with mask, snorkel and a pair of fins using a crawling style. BF races are held for distances of 50, 100 and 200 m in swimming pools and over various long distances in the openwater environment such as 4 km and 6 km. It is reported that BF was introduced in 2006 to provide the opportunity for competition by swimmers who cannot afford to purchase a set of monofins. Swimmers must remain on the surface of the water at all times for the duration of the race except when starting or make a turns at the end of a swimming pool where an immersion of a distance of 15m is permitted.