Synonyms for monumentorum or Related words with monumentorum

necnon              aliorum              dalmatiae              jussu              accedunt              imperatorum              observata              veteris              illustrati              commentariis              versionem              vitiis              romanarum              quibusdam              observationibus              commentariorum              variarum              eorum              regionum              veterum              decreta              scriptis              literis              martyris              gestarum              moribus              nominibus              aucta              auctoritate              locorum              virorum              ejus              religionis              croatiae              carminum              simplicium              graecis              virtutibus              typis              latinitatis              episcopis              earum              tabulis              complectens              chaldaicum              historiam              magistrum              hymni              beatorum              orationis             



Examples of "monumentorum"
Etiam hoc fragmentum sexti saeculi videtur; litterarum forma inprimis simile est fragmentins illis tribus evangeliorum purpureis, Romae, Londini et Vindobonae servatis, quae anno 1846 in priore collectione Monumentorum Sacrorum publicavi. In apparatu critico editionis meae VII. siglo N notata sunt.
After having long lain in oblivion, the works of Euthalius were published in Rome, in 1698, by Lorenzo Alessandro Zaccagni, Prefect of the Vatican Library. They are embodied in the first volume of his "Collectanea Monumentorum Veterum Ecclesiæ Græcæ ac Latinæ." They can also be found in Gallandi ("Biblioth. Pat.," X, 197) and in Migne ("Patrologia Graeca," LXXXV, 621).
Lorenzo Alessandro Zaccagni (1652 -1712) was an Italian librarian and Patristic scholar and author. His main contribution is a collection of texts relating to early controversies in Christianity, "Collectanea monumentorum veterum Ecclesiæ græcæ et latinæ", published by the Vatican in 1698 with the approval of the Congregation of Propaganda Fide.
A Latin edition "Acta Disputationis Archelai, Episcopi Mesopotamia et Manetis Haresiarch" was published by Lorenzo Alessandro Zaccagni, librarian of the Vatican Library, in "Collectanea monumentorum veterum Ecclesiae graecae et latinae." Rome, 1698. Charles H. Beeson's edition appeared in 1906. An improved critical edition of the text of Breeson was published by Brepols Publishers (Turnhout, Belgium) in 2001. An English translation of Zaccagni's edition by S. D. F. Salmond appeared in 1871. A new translation by Mark Vermes of Breeson's edition appeared in 2001.
In 1626 Worm published his "Fasti Danici", or "Danish Chronology," containing the results of his researches into runic lore; and in 1636 "Runir seu Danica literatura antiquissima", "Runes: the oldest Danish literature," a compilation of transcribed runic texts. In 1643 his "Danicorum Monumentorum", "Danish Monuments" was published. The first written study of runestones, it is also one of the only surviving sources for depictions of numerous runestones and inscriptions from Denmark, some of which are now lost.
Most of the official documents and private reports, however, which bear upon the council, were made known in the 16th century and since. The most complete collection of them is that of J. Le Plat, "Monumentorum ad historicam Concilii Tridentini collectio" (7 vols., Leuven, 1781–87). New materials(Vienna, 1872); by JJI von Döllinger "(Ungedruckte Berichte und Tagebücher zur Geschichte des Concilii von Trient)" (2 parts, Nördlingen, 1876); and August von Druffel, "Monumenta Tridentina" (Munich, 1884–97).
By 1762, Browne moved the museum he had established in Rome back to his country house, Warren House in Wimbledon. In 1768, he published "Catalogus veteris aevi varii generis monumentorum quae cimeliarchio Lyde Browne … asservantur" ("Catalogue of the various ancient monuments in the museum of Lyde Browne"), a Latin catalogue of 130 of its objects with 80 detailed entries. That year, he also became a director of the Bank of England, a post he held until his death.
Corpus Inscriptionum et Monumentorum Religionis Mithriacae (or CIMRM) is a two volume collection of inscriptions and monuments relating primarily to the Mithraic Mysteries. It was compiled by Maarten Jozef Vermaseren and published at the Hague by Martinus Nijhoff, 1956, 1960 in 2 vols. Publication was sponsored by the Royal Flemish Academy and the Netherlands Organization for Pure Research. It is based on an earlier 1947 work of the same title that began as an entry in a competition organized by the Department of Fine Arts and Literature of the Flemish Academy.
The Casanatense Library still preserves 1125 manuscript volumes of opinions, reports, and statements ("voti, relazioni, posizioni") concerning matters treated in the various Congregations to which Casanata belonged. His curial duties did not prevent him from taking an interest in letters and the sciences. He was on friendly terms and corresponded with the learned men of his day. Among those whom he encouraged most was Zaccagni, whom he induced to publish a collection of materials for the ancient history of the Greek and Latin Churches, "Collectanea monumentorum veterum Ecclesiæ græcæ et latinæ" (Rome, 1694, 4to).
Inscriptions and monuments related to the Mithraic Mysteries are catalogued in a two volume work by Maarten J. Vermaseren, the "Corpus Inscriptionum et Monumentorum Religionis Mithriacae" (or CIMRM). The earliest monument showing Mithras slaying the bull is thought to be CIMRM 593, found in Rome. There is no date, but the inscription tells us that it was dedicated by a certain Alcimus, steward of T. Claudius Livianus. Vermaseren and Gordon believe that this Livianus is a certain Livianus who was commander of the Praetorian guard in 101 CE, which would give an earliest date of 98–99 CE.
In 1718 the two Maurists started on a new literary tour through Germany and the Netherlands to collect material for Martin Bouquet's "Rerum Gallicarum et Francicarum Scriptores". Besides collecting valuable material for Bouquet's work they gathered an immense mass of other historical documents which they published in a large work entitled "Veterum scriptorum et monumentorum historicorum, dogmaticorum et moralium amplissima collectio" (9 vols. fol. Paris, 1724–33). They also jointly published in French a learned account of their journeys: "Voyage littéraire de deux religieux bénédictins de la Congrégation de St. Maur" (2 vols. Paris, 1717 and 1724).
Although animal-headed figures are prevalent in contemporary Egyptian and Gnostic mythological representations, an exact parallel to the Mithraic leontocephaline figure has not been found. The name of the figure has been deciphered from dedicatory inscriptions to be "Arimanius", a Latinized form of the name "Ahriman" – a demonic figure in the Zoroastrian pantheon. Arimanius is known from inscriptions to have been a god in the Mithraic cult as seen, for example, in images from the "Corpus Inscriptionum et Monumentorum Religionis Mithriacae" (CIMRM) such as 222 from Ostia, 369 from Rome, and 1773 and 1775 from Pannonia.
The Casanatense Library still preserves 1125 manuscript volumes of opinions, reports, and statements ("voti, relazioni, posizioni") concerning matters treated in the various Congregations to which Casanata belonged. His curial duties did not prevent him from taking an interest in letters and the sciences. He was on friendly terms and corresponded with the learned men of his day. Among those whom he encouraged most was Lorenzo Alessandro Zaccagni, whom he induced to publish a collection of materials for the ancient history of the Greek and Latin Churches, "Collectanea monumentorum veterum Ecclesiæ græcæ et latinæ"
In 1708 Martène and his fellow Benedictine, Ursin Durand, were commissioned to ransack the archives of France and Belgium for materials for the forthcoming revised edition of the "Gallia Christiana", proposed by the prior of Sainte-Marthe. The numerous documents gathered by them from about eight hundred abbeys and one hundred cathedrals were incorporated in the abovementioned work or in the five volumes of the "Thesaurus novus anecdotorum" (Paris, 1717). The results of a journey made through the Netherlands and Germany for the purpose of documentary research were embodied by the two scholars in the nine folio volumes of "Veterum scriptorum et monumentorum ecclesiasticorum et dogmaticorum amplissima collectio".(Paris, 1724–33). Finally, the sixth volume of the "Annales Ordinis S. Benedicti" (Paris, 1739) is the work of Martène alone.
The fruits of his labours in the historical field appeared in a work entitled, "Antiquae Lectiones, seu antiqua monumenta ad historiam mediae aetatis illustrandam" (6 volumes, Ingolstadt, 1601–1604). In 1608 a seventh volume, a "Promptuarium Ecclesiasticum" was added by way of supplement. The work lacked systematic arrangement, and included much matter of minor value. It was afterwards entirely recast and critically sifted by Basnage, under the title "Thesaurus Monumentorum ecclesiasticorum et historicorum" (7 vols., Antwerp, 1725). Canisius edited for the first time the "Chronica Victoris Episcop. Tunnunensis et Joannis Episcop. Biclariensis", and the "Legatio Luitprandi" (Ingolstadt, 1600). We are likewise indebted to him for an edition of the "Historiae miscellae Pauli Diaconi" (ib., 1603).
An eight-leaf copy of the Lorsch annals for 703–803 was produced probably in 835 by a single scribe. The "Sankt-Paul codex", as it is now called, which is the sole surviving quire of an otherwise lost manuscript, was still in the library of Sankt-Blasien in 1790, when it was edited by Aemilianus Ussermann, bishop of Bamberg, in his collection of documents illustrative of "Alemannian" German history, "Germaniae sacrae prodomus seu collectio monumentorum res Alemannicas illustrantium". In 1809, as a result of the Napoleonic Wars, the monks of Sankt-Blasien moved, with their library, to the Abbey of Sankt-Paul im Lavanttal. In 1820 G. H. Pertz sought the manuscript for the "Monumenta Germaniae Historica", but it could not be found and so the "MGH" version was based on Ussermann's printed edition of 1790. The manuscript was recovered by 1889, when Eberhard Katz edited a new version. Katz described the codex (today lost again), dated it to the ninth century and suggested it originated at the Abbey of Reichenau because of a marginal notice of the burial of Charlemagne's brother-in-law Gerold of Vinzgouw there.