Synonyms for moplahs or Related words with moplahs

razakars              mappilas              nairs              sardars              akalis              naxalites              coorgs              gosains              tribals              bhils              satyagrahis              sepoys              pathans              dacoits              kallars              pandits              muhajir              britishers              jathas              ansars              bhumihars              biharis              amritdhari              jatha              maoists              moplah              kashmiris              nlft              misls              nadars              ulfa              bhil              bhindranwale              jagirdars              mullahs              kharijite              bengalis              sannyasis              razakar              gurjars              yadavs              santhals              bhumihar              sanyasis              nihangs              parsis              garasia              pashtuns              sadhus              ascetics             



Examples of "moplahs"
Bearys incorporate the local Tulu culture of Dakshina Kannada and diverse traditions of the Moplahs of the Malabar coast.
The Madras Army relied heavily on the Moplahs of Malabar and on soldiers from Kodagu, at that time known as Coorg.
Once they had eliminated the minimal presence of the government, the Moplahs turned their full attention to attacking Hindus while Ernad and Valluvanad were declared Khilafat kingdoms.
""20th January, '22: — Variankunnath Kunhamad Haji and six other Moplahs who were charged with waging war and tried by a Military court, were shot at Malappuram to-day. "
Along with these monuments, abandoned graves of British officers who lost their lives during the Rebellion can be seen in Malabar. This include that of Private F. M. Eley, Private H. C. Hutchings (both died of wounds received in action against the Moplahs at Tirurangadi on 22 July 1921), William John Duncan Rowley (Assistant Suprededent of Police, Palghat, killed at Tirurangadi by a mob of Moplahs at the outbreak of the Rebellion on 20 August 1921 – aged 28).
The seed was thus sown on 28 April 1920. If the Conference had been held at any other station outside Ernad Taluk, the Khilafat Resolution would never have been passed. Manjeri was the scene of more than one Moplah outrage, and was the last place where the Conference should have been held. In Ernad Taluk, the Moplahs preponderate and there was nothing surprising in the passing of the Khilafat Resolution with an overwhelming majority of Moplahs at the Conference. 
The seed was thus sown on 28th April, 1920. If the Conference had been held at any other station outside Ernad Taluk, the Khilafat Resolution would never have been passed. Manjeri was the scene of more than one Moplah outrage, and was the last place where the Conference should have been held. In Ernad Taluk, the Moplahs preponderate and there was nothing surprising in the passing of the Khilafat Resolution with an overwhelming majority of Moplahs at the Conference. 
In 1902 the basis of recruitment for this regiment and one other (see 78th Moplah Rifles for additional detail) was changed from Madrasis to Moplahs. Both units were disbanded in 1907.
The 1st battalion saw action in the campaign against the Moplahs in Malabar in 1922 while the 2nd battalion was deployed to Shanghai in 1927 before moving to India in 1929.
The Khilafat movement was introduced into this happy and peaceful district of Malabar on 28 April 1920, by a Resolution at the Malabar District Conference, held at Manjeri, the head-quarters of Ernad Taluk. On 30 March 1921, there was a meeting at which one Abdulla Kutti Musaliar of Vayakkad lectured on  Khilafat, in Kizhakoth Amsom, Calicut Taluk. And at a second meeting held the next day at Pannur Mosque, there was some unpleasantness between the Moplahs on one side, and Nayars and Tiyyars, who resented the Khilafat meeting, on the other. Moplahs mustered strong and proceeded to attack the Matom (place of worship) belonging to the Hindu Adhigari of the village. 
The 78th Moplah Rifles were an infantry regiment of the British Indian Army. They could trace their origins to 1794, when they were raised as the 35th Madras Battalion. At the beginning of the 20th century the basis for recruitment was changed from Madrasis to Moplahs - a Muslim Dravidian people located along the coast of Malabar. The Moplahs had a reputation as an aggressive race and it was hoped to make use of their martial skills in the Indian Army. A problem from the beginning was that the population numbers available for recruitment were limited.
Dr Mishra’s analysis points to the conclusion that minority religions are advantageously situated as far as occupational distribution is concerned. It is likely, however, that there are differences between one region of India and another. Syrian Christians, for instance, show a more “advanced” pattern in Travancore than in North Kerala. Similarly, Moplahs in North Kerala are more advanced than their co-coreligionists in South and Central Kerala. This is perhaps related to the fact that in North Kerala the Moplahs formerly wielded political power."
By end of 1920, the situation had gone out of control. The Moplahs, passed the Khilafat edict, declared Ali Musaliar as the Caliphate leader, and passed a resolution that they would collect taxes henceforth and not the British. These events snowballed into the eventual riots.
So, in enrolling, and allowing the Moplahs to organize themselves into a movement, Congress had committed a major blunder, as the book itself mentions ""These were duped by political: leaders into passing a resolution on Khilafat, which they did not understand. ...""
So, in enrolling, and allowing the Moplahs to organize themselves into a movement, Congress had committed a major blunder, as the book itself mentions ""These were duped by political leaders into passing a resolution on Khilafat, which they did not understand. ...""
For the next fifteen years the regiment was mainly stationed abroad with only brief periods spent in the UK. The major operation it was engaged in during this time was in the suppression of the rebellion by the Moplahs in Southern India in 1873.
A Mappila (Malayalam: മാപ്പിള), also known as a Muslim Mappila, Moplahs or Jonaka Mappila, is a member of the largest Muslim group in the Indian state of Kerala. The community arose primarily as a result of the pre- and post-Islamic Arab contact with Kerala, mainly based upon trade.
By end of 1920, the situation had gone out of control. The Moplahs, passed the Khilafat edict, declared Ali Musaliar as the Caliphate leader, and passed a resolution that they would collect taxes henceforth and not the British. These events snowballed into the eventual riots.
Formed in 1884, the MSP were initially known as the Malappuram Special Police, having been quartered in Malappuram. Its initial personnel consisted of 80 Constables, 4 Native Head Constables, 4 Sergeants, a Bugler and a European Inspector, who were temporarily drafted into a special force to deal with periodical outbreaks for freedom by native Muslims Moplahs. The squad was made permanent in 1897.
In the year that the Moplahs became the 2nd Moplah Rifles (1902), a detachment was shipped to England for the Coronation of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra. They attracted attention, in part because of their scarlet zouave jackets and red tarbushes - a headdress not previously worn by the Indian Army.