Synonyms for nazarbaug or Related words with nazarbaug

jehangirabad              hanseswari              chaoyaima              varanad              javaregowda              rajindera              sadaguru              ballatgi              sityog              apathsahayar              matiabag              kachhadia              nagaraij              pisharasyar              sanwaliya              thamrongthai              yameshwar              singhpuri              ponnuswami              mahadeorao              khoker              kilkari              asabarna              meenati              thrippunithara              maruthy              ijyaraj              shankarapuram              mayilaadum              manjay              berragi              chuphal              parmveer              tirupazhanam              livehindustan              baidarkala              sayfuddin              suresvaracharya              anugoonj              navjetdeep              pratikshya              anandhavalli              vidyavardhak              ananthaswami              thiruvedhikudi              angajan              singaravadivel              chichola              ishtehari              haravu             



Examples of "nazarbaug"
The term Maharaja Palace actually refers to a series of palaces in Vadodara, Gujarat, India, constructed since the Gaekwad, a prominent Maratha family, started ruling the Baroda State. The first one was a building known as the Sarkar Wada. This building, not really a palace, was given up for the Nazarbaug Palace built in old classical style.
The Palace had a classic look, so in Gujarati it was told about its look as 'Nazar na laage' from which it was named Nazar. The Palace also had beautiful garden from which its name included baug. So it was named as Nazarbaug Palace.
Nazarbaug Palace or Nazar Bāgh Palace was the Gaekwad's royal palace in the city of Vadodara, Gujarat state, western India. The Nazar Bāgh Palace' was built in 1721. It had three storeys and is the oldest palace in Baroda. It was constructed by Malhār Rāo Gaekwad in the late 19th century. This palace was used on ceremonial occasions by the Gaekwads. Till recently, it housed the royal family heirlooms. It had solid gold and silver guns, each barrel weighing over 100 kg. In the grounds it also has contains the "Shïsh Mahal", a Palace of Glass.
By the beginning of the 20th century, the relations of the British with the four largest princely states—Hyderabad, Mysore, Jammu and Kashmir, and Baroda were managed by a British Resident under the direct authority the Governor-General of India. In 1911, Baroda State spanned , and the population was 2,032,798 persons as per the 1911 census of India. The state was very wealthy. "The Pittsburgh Press" reported in 1927 that the diamond necklace, which contained the Star of the South diamond, was a part of a royal collection worth $10,000,000 at the time, housed in the Nazarbaug Palace (built 1721) in Baroda city; another important part of the collection was a cloth embroidered with precious stones and seed pearls, made to cover the tomb of Mohammed.
During the diamond’s stay in India, Prince Malhār Rāo of the royal family of Gaekwad got to know about the stone. He instructed E. H. Dresden of London to purchase the diamond, who purchased it from Halphen and Associates for £80,000 on behalf of the prince. The Star of the South was in the possession of the Gaekwad family for several years. It was later mounted on a necklace along with the English Dresden diamond. The "The Pittsburgh Press" reported in 1927, the diamond necklace which contained the Star of the South diamond, as a part of the royal collection worth $10,000,000 at the time, housed in the Nazarbaug Palace in Baroda; another important part of the collection was a cloth embroidered with precious stones and seed pearls, made to cover the tomb of Mohammed. In 1934, Prince Malhār Rāo’s son told Robert M. Shipley, an American gemologist about this. In 1948, the Maharani Sītā Devī, was photographed wearing the necklace at her husband Maharajah Pratāp Sinh's birthday party.