Synonyms for neurasthenia or Related words with neurasthenia

neurosis              presyncope              hypochondria              sleeplessness              meige              neurosyphilis              cephalea              asthenic              acanthocytosis              neuroses              morgellons              paraphrenia              postconcussion              dyspeptic              fibromylagia              psychoorganic              paralytica              melancholia              dysphasia              hyperosmia              nonconvulsive              dysthymia              debility              migrainous              psychosomatic              tremens              psychoneurosis              exertional              aboulia              parasitosis              amnesias              paresthesias              listlessness              earaches              dysgnosia              aurium              stomachache              menieres              hemiplegic              obstipation              hypoesthesia              migraines              migraineheadaches              sialorrhea              radiculopathic              dejerine              sottas              brachioradial              dipsomania              hypersalivation             



Examples of "neurasthenia"
Americans were said to be particularly prone to neurasthenia, which resulted in the nickname "Americanitis" (popularized by William James). Another, rarely used, term for neurasthenia is nervosism.
2013, Poem Collection of Renhang, Neurasthenia, Taiwan
Kerr describes the relationship of the poem to Owen's neurasthenia as "obvious though complex".
Adam released 4 solo albums, "Soliloquy", "100 Years Overtime", "Real World Trilogy" and "Neurasthenia".
Alston's career was handicapped by neurasthenia and other mental disorders which forced his hospitalization after his playing career was over.
One contemporary opinion of neurasthenia is that it was actually dysautonomia, an "imbalance" of the autonomic nervous system.
Nevertheless, neurasthenia was a common diagnosis during World War I for "shell shock", but its use declined a decade later. Soldiers who deserted their post could be executed even if they had a medical excuse, but officers who had neurasthenia were not executed.
This concept remained popular well into the 20th century, eventually coming to be seen as a behavioural rather than physical condition, with a diagnosis that excluded postviral syndromes. Neurasthenia has largely been abandoned as a medical diagnosis. The ICD-10 system of the World Health Organization categorizes neurasthenia under "F48 - Other neurotic disorders".
During and after the First World War many combatants and former combatants found their lives and minds permanently altered by the violent, loud and traumatic life of trench warfare. This disorder was called "shell shock" or "neurasthenia". Wilfred Owen was diagnosed with neurasthenia in 1916, within four months of arriving in France, and was briefly invalided home.
With neurologist Gilbert Ballet he was the author of an important book on neurasthenia, titled "L'hygiène du neurasthénique" (1900). It was later translated into English and published as "The treatment of neurasthenia" (1903). Among his other written efforts are the following:
In 1916 he enlisted in the British Army and returned to Dublin after the war with neurasthenia, rendering him fearful of crowds.
Beer's early death was attributed to neurasthenia. He is buried with his parents and siblings in the Jewish cemetery in Schönhauser Allee, Berlin.
- In one festival in France of 2012 Neil, bandmate of Lehmann in Neurasthenia, has performed on guitars as stand-in for Andrea Neri
Dana, Charles L. “On a New Type of Neurasthenic Disorder – Angio – Paralytic or ‘Pulsating’ Neurasthenia,” "JAMA" XXIV(4) (Jan. 26, 1895): 110-112.
George Miller Beard (May 8, 1839 – January 23, 1883) was an American neurologist who popularized the term neurasthenia, starting around 1869.
Several descriptions of illness resembling those of chronic fatigue syndrome have been reported for at least two hundred years. In the 19th century, neurologist George Miller Beard popularised the concept of neurasthenia, with symptoms including fatigue, anxiety, headache, impotence, neuralgia and depression. This concept remained popular well into the 20th century, eventually coming to be seen as a behavioural rather than physical condition, with a diagnosis that excluded postviral syndromes. Neurasthenia has largely been abandoned as a medical diagnosis. The ICD-10 system of the World Health Organization now categorizes neurasthenia under (F48 Other neurotic disorders) which specifically excludes chronic fatigue syndrome.
William James was diagnosed with neurasthenia, and was quoted as saying, "I take it that no man is educated who has never dallied with the thought of suicide."
Sigmund Freud reviewed Mitchell's book on "The Treatment of Certain Forms of Neurasthenia and Hysteria" in 1887; and used electrotherapy in his work into the 1890s.
Krafft-Ebing's study of sexual perversion, Psychopathia Sexualis (1886), describes female ejaculation under the heading "Congenital Sexual Inversion in Women" as a perversion related to neurasthenia and homosexuality.
Averbeck was a pioneer in the field of physiotherapy. He believed that the right combination of therapeutic exercises and massage were vital in the treatment of chronic illness and disease. Among his written works was a treatise on acute neurasthenia called "Die akute Neurasthenie, die plötzliche Erschöpfung der nervösen Energie". Reportedly, Sigmund Freud found it an important reference work in his research involving the correlation of modern-day stress and neurasthenia.