Synonyms for novgorod_viceroyalty or Related words with novgorod_viceroyalty

pskov_governorate              olonets_governorate              vologda_viceroyalty              tver_viceroyalty              tver_governorate              novgorod_governorate              kazan_governorate              vologda_governorate              kargopolsky_uyezd              starorussky_uyezd              irkutsk_governorate              uyezd              arkhangelsk_governorate              bezhetsky              ustyuzhensky_uyezd              lodeynopolsky_uyezd              erivan_governorate              namestnichestvo              novotorzhsky              borovichsky_uyezd              pskov_viceroyalty              vytegorsky              voronezh_governorate              krestetsky              kherson_governorate              zubtsovsky              kashinsky              domanivka              okruha              novorossiysk_governorate              kalinin_oblast              novorossiya_governorate              mogilev_governorate              vazhsky              kemsky_uyezd              opochka              odessa_oblast              erivansky              novgorodsky_uyezd              sebezhsky              azov_governorate              vesyegonsky              kolsky_uyezd              dzhevanshirsky              ostashkovsky              guberniya              volost              vitebsk_governorate              northern_dvina_governorate              shenkursky             



Examples of "novgorod_viceroyalty"
The governorate was established in 1727 from Belozersk, Novgorod, Pskov, Tver, and Velikiye Luki Provinces of St. Petersburg Governorate. It was abolished by a decree ("ukase") of Catherine II on , 1776, which established Novgorod and Tver Viceroyalties instead. Novgorod Viceroyalty included Novgorod and Olonets Oblast, whereas Tver Viceroyalty was made of the former Tver Province. The viceroyalty was never formally abolished, however, after a number of administrative transformations it was divided into what was later to become Olonets Governorate, and into Novgorod Viceroyalty proper. After 1796, Novgorod Viceroyalty was mentioned in official documents only as Novgorod Governorate. This second Novgorod Governorate existed until 1927, when its territory was included into Leningrad Oblast.
Novgorod Viceroyalty () was an administrative division (a "namestnichestvo") of the Russian Empire, which existed in 1776–1796. The seat of the Viceroyalty was located in Novgorod.
In 1796, Olonets Viceroyalty was abolished and divided between Novgorod and Arkhangelsk Viceroyalties. After this event, Novgorod Viceroyalty was mentioned in official documents only as Novgorod Governorate.
The administration of the viceroyalty was performed by a "namestnik" (vice-roy) and controlled by a governor general. The governors of Novgorod Viceroyalty were
On December 11, 1781 Olonets Oblast and Novoladozhsky Uyezd of Novgorod Oblast were transferred from Novgorod Viceroyalty to Saint Petersburg Governorate.
The geographical location of the viceroyalty, which was elongated from south to north, was inconvenient and lead to exchange of lands with neighboring viceroyalties. During this period, Novgorod Viceroyalty bordered with Vologda Viceroyalty in the northeast, Yaroslavl Governorate and Tver Viceroyalty in the south, Pskov Governorate in the west, Saint Petersburg Governorate and Sweden in the northwest. In terms of the modern political division of Russia, Novgorod Viceroyalty in this period comprised the areas of what is currently Novgorod Oblast, Murmansk Oblast, the greater part of the Republic of Karelia, as well as parts of Vologda and Leningrad Oblasts and minor areas of Tver Oblast.
The viceroyalty was established by a decree ("ukase") of Catherine II on , 1776. It was subdivided into two oblasts: Novgorod and Olonets Oblast. The predecessor of Novgorod Viceroyalty was Novgorod Governorate with the seat in Novgorod. Tver Province which belonged to Novgorod Governorate, was transformed into Tver Viceroyalty, and the rest of the governorate became Novgorod Viceroyalty. Novgorod Oblast included ten "uyezds", and, in particular, Kresttsy and Kirillov were chartered to become uyezd towns. Olonets Oblast included five uyezds, and Petrozavodsk was chartered in 1777.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the territory was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished and renamed Novgorod Governorate. The area was a part of Novgorodsky Uyezd.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, it was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1738, Ustyuzhna was chartered and became the seat of Ustyuzhensky Uyezd. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and Ustyuzhensky Uyezd was transferred to Novgorod Governorate.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished and the area was transferred to Novgorod Governorate. In 1917, Chudovo was the administrative center of Chudovskaya Volost of Novgorodsky Uyezd.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1773, Borovichsky Uyezd was established. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished and Borovichsky Uyezd was transferred to Novgorod Governorate.
The area was sparsely populated until the 19th century. In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, it was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and the area, which was a part of Ustyuzhensky Uyezd, was transferred to Novgorod Governorate.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and the area, which was a part of Borovichsky Uyezd, was transferred to Novgorod Governorate.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and the area, then a part of Ustyuzhensky Uyezd, was transferred to Novgorod Governorate.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known from 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, it was transferred to the newly established Novgorod Governorate. In 1773, Vytegra was chartered, and in 1776, Vytegorsky Uyezd was established as one of the uyezds of newly established Novgorod Viceroyalty. It became a part of Olonets Oblast.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and the area, which was part of Borovichsky Uyezd, was transferred to Novgorod Governorate.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, Beloozero was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate) and named one of the towns constituting the governorate. In 1727, a separate Novgorod Governorate was split off and Belozersk became the seat of Belozersk Province in Novgorod Governorate. In 1776, the territory was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished and Belozersky Uyezd became a part of Novgorod Governorate.
The first mention of Bologoye in historic records dates back to 1495, which is considered its year of foundation. In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, Bologoye was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as St. Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1770, it became a part of Valdaysky Uyezd of Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was transformed into Novgorod Governorate.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. Belozersk (Beloozero) was named as one of the towns constituting the governorate, and in 1727, Belozersk became the seat of Belozersk Oblast of Novgorod Governorate. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished and Belozersky Uyezd was transferred to Novgorod Governorate.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the territory was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as St. Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1770, Valday was chartered and became the seat of Valdaysky Uyezd of Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was transformed into Novgorod Governorate. Located along the road connecting Moscow and St. Petersburg, Valday developed as a major trade center. The town became the leading center of bell manufacturing in Russia. It also became a major pilgrim destination.