Synonyms for nyeon or Related words with nyeon

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Examples of "nyeon"
Young San Hue Sang(영산회상), Cheon Nyeon Man se(천년만세), Gagok(가곡). Boheosa(보허사), Yeominlak(여민락).
Various literary figures of the Joseon period hailed from Mungyeong, as did heroes of the resistance against Japanese attacks in the late 16th century (the local commander Sin Gil-won, 1548–1592) and of the righteous army movement in the early 20th (the leader I Gang-nyeon, 1858–1908).
Frustrated with unsatisfactory reward for the coup which deposed Gwanghaegun, Yi Gwal rebelled against King Injo in 1624. He temporarily occupied Hanseong (modern-day Seoul), but was eventually crushed. Han Myeong-nyeon, an accomplice of Yi Gwal, was also killed, but his son Han Yun fled to the Manchus.
Local attractions include the Gaeun Coal Museum, a monument to "uibyeong" general Yi Gang-nyeon, and the putative birthplace of the Hubaekje king Gyeon Hwon. Anglers also visit the area in order to fish the Yeong River, which flows through the town on its way to the Jinnam Bridge area and the Nakdong River beyond.
Finally in 1455 he forced his powerless young nephew, Danjong, to abdicate, declaring himself seventh king of the Joseon dynasty. Later he demoted Danjong to prince and ordered him to be poisoned after his younger brother, Grand Prince Geumsung, and later six scholars including Seong Sam-mun, Pak Paeng-nyeon, and Yi Gae plotted to remove the Suyang from power in an attempt to put Danjong back on the throne.
In the 1980s, the share of assets contributed by gifts and inheritance was 27 percent, but the comparable share rose to 29 percent in the 1990s and to 42 percent in the 2000s, according to a recent paper by Kim Nak-nyeon, an economics professor at Dongkuk University. The share is still lower than in advanced countries such as Germany (42.5 percent), France (47 percent) and Britain (56.5 percent).
The first television series, a sageuk, of South Korea aired on state channel KBS in 1962, titled "Gukto malli". In the 1970s, in contrast to the previous decade, historical TV series portrayed national heroes like Yi Sun-shin or Sejong the Great. The characteristic series of the 1980s was "Joseonwangjo 500 nyeon" ("500 Years of Joseon"). The 1990s were dominated by contemporary dramas with regards to popularity and viewership ratings, despite having produced a number of quality sageuk. The 2000s saw the birth of the "fusion sageuk" genre, which changed the historical series genre in South Korea. Some of the significant works from this period are "Hur Jun", "Damo" and "Dae Jang Geum".
The characteristic classic sageuk TV series of the 1980s was "Joseonwangjo 500 nyeon" (조선왕조500년, "500 Years of Joseon"), which ran for 8 years, airing 11 separate TV series with over 800 episodes altogether, depicting the history of Joseon. The series referenced official historical documents (albeit liberally to some extent) and often included debated events and themes. It was directed by Lee Byung-hoon, who later also helmed the popular hallyu series "Dae Jang Geum". The state channel KBS aired "Gaeguk" (개국, "Founding of the Nation") which depicted King Taejo's usurpation of the Goryeo throne in an overtly positive light, reminiscent of Jeon Du-hwan's rise in politics.
In April 1510, two Japanese men, Obarishi and Yasko, led between 4000 and 5000 men in an attack on Busan, Naei, Yeom, and the castle located at Naei. A military general stationed at Busan, Yi U-jeung (李友曾), was killed and the leader at the Naei port, Kim Sae-gyun (金世鈞), was kidnapped. Yu Dam-nyeon (柳聃年) and Hwang Hyeong (黃衡) were immediately sent by the Korean government to suppress the riots. As a result, the son of Sō Yoshimori (宗義盛), the governor of Tsushima Island, was killed and the riots were subdued.
The 1980s saw a turn in Korean television, as color TV became available. Modern dramas tried to evoke nostalgia from urban dwellers by depicting rural life. Kim Soo-hyun's first real commercial success, "Love and Ambition" (사랑과 야망, Saranggwa yamang), aired on MBC in 1987 is regarded as a milestone of Korean television, having recorded a 78% viewership. "Streets became quiet at around the airing time of the drama as 'practically everyone in the country' was at home in front of the TV", according to "The Korea Times". The most outstanding classical historical series of the era is considered to be "500 Years of Joseon" (조선왕조500년, Joseonwangjo 500 nyeon), a serial that ran for eight years, consisting of 11 separate series. The serial was produced by Lee Byung-hoon, who later directed one of the biggest international successes of Korean drama, "Dae Jang Geum".
The Six were Seong Sam-mun, Pak Paeng-nyeon, Ha Wi-ji, Yi Gae, Yu Eung-bu, and Yu Seong-won. Most were members of the Hall of Worthies, a royal research institute, who had been appointed by King Sejong. Both King Sejong and King Munjong had charged them with looking after King Danjong (grandson and son respectively), and they reacted with outrage to Sejo's usurpation of the throne in 1455. Together with Kim Jil, they plotted a coup to coincide with the visit of a Ming Dynasty envoy. When the banquet and subsequently the assassination plot were postponed, Kim Jil lost his heart and betrayed the plot to his father-in-law, who reported to Sejo. The Six except Yu Seong-won, who committed suicide with his wife, were seized and tortured.
In the book "Haedong Jukji" by Choe Yeong-nyeon (최영년, Hanja: 崔永年) from 1921, the idu-writing 托肩 is used to represent "Tak-gyeon". The translation of 托肩 is "push-shoulder". However this does not mean that the translation of Taekkyon is "push the shoulder", because idu is just a way to phonetically write pure Korean words with Chinese characters. At the same time, all the arm techniques of taekkyeon are generated from a shoulder movement first, by whipping the entire arm out. When fighting, there are numerous ways Taekkyeon pushes and pulls an opponent by the shoulders. Also in this book, there's a poem and a non-fictional text about Taekkyon, calling it lyrically "flying leg technique" (bi-gak-sul, 비각술, 飛脚術).
Sejo felt deeply betrayed for he had valued the six scholar-officials very highly and promoted them to high positions in favor of his own supporters who helped him take the throne. He tried to force them to repent their deeds and acknowledge his legitimacy with combination of torture, offers of pardon, and even poetry. He sent Kim Jil to their cells to recite a poem that King Taejong of Joseon had used to test the great Goryeo scholar Jeong Mongju's loyalty to the Goryeo dynasty. Seong Sam-mun, Pak Paeng-nyeon, and Yi Gae all answered with poems that reaffirmed their loyalty to Danjong. (These famous death poems cemented their reputation in Korean history.)
Samnyeon Sanseong Fortress (literally "Three-Years' Mountain Fortress") is the ruins of a Silla fortress and wall that was built beginning in the year 470. The fortress was reconstructed in 486. The ruins are located in present-day Boeun, South Korea. During the Three Kingdoms Period the town of Boeun-eup, located two kilometers from the fortress, was known as Samnyeon-gun or Samnyeonsan-gun and it is believed by some that the fortress gets its name from the town. However, the "Samguk Sagi" relates that the fortress was completed in three years (Korean, "sam nyeon"), and that the fortress derived its name from this fact. This account also suggests that the nearby town derived its name from the fortress, rather than vice versa. The Annals of Joseon Dynasty show that the fortress was known as Ojeong Sanseong Fortress and was used during the Joseon Dynasty, probably because the fortress is located atop Mount Ojeongsan.
A rating disclaimer is displayed on the start of the program for five seconds explaining "This program may not be suitable for children/adolescents under the age of "X", so parental guidance is recommended"(이 프로그램은 "X"세 미만의 어린이/청소년이 시청하기에 부적절하므로 보호자의 시청지도가 필요한 프로그램입니다, I peu-ro-geu-raem eun "X: se-mi-man ui eo rin-i/cheong-so nyeon-i si cheong hagi e bu-jeok jeol ha-meu robo hoja ui si cheong-ji doga pir-yo han peu-ro-geu-raem ipnida) for 7, 12, and 15 ratings. "All" and "19" ratings have a different disclaimer, which say "This program is suitable for all ages"(이 프로그램은 모든 연령의 시청자가 시청할 수 있는 프로그램입니다) and "This program is not suggested for youths under the age of 19"(이 프로그램은 19세 미만의 청소년이 시청하기에 부적절한 프로그램입니다) respectively.
Yang escaped, but Ujing did not. Though being pardoned promptly by the new king, he soon became threatened by Myeong who became "Sangdaedeung". So in 837, Ujing fled and entrusted himself with Jang Bogo in Cheonghaejin. However, a year later, Myeong fomented a revolt against King Huigang which killed several of the King's aides. Faced with defeat, King Huigang committed suicide. Kim Myeong then ascended the throne as King Minae. Kim Yang, who was then concealing himself on a mountain near the capital, heard the news and raised up an army to go to Cheonghaejin. He told Ujing of these events and persuaded him to have his revenge. Ujing asked Jang Bogo to help him to take advantage of the confusion of the country and to make himself a king. Jang Bogo agreed and had his friend Jeong Nyeon also follow Ujing. In 839, Ujing and his followers defeated King Minae's army at the battle of Daegu and quickly advanced upon the capital. All the king's aides then ran away leaving the king behind, so the king hid himself in a villa near the royal palace. Soldiers came into the palace and searched for the king. Finally, they found the king in the villa and killed him in spite of his pleas. Kim Rihong was also killed. Ujing then placed himself on the throne as King Sinmu.
This dish seemed to be eaten not only by commoners. According to "Haedong jukji" (海東竹枝), poetry collection written by Choe Yeong-nyeon (崔永年 1856∼1935), "haejangguk" is referred to as "hyojonggaeng" (), which literally means a "dawn bell soup". The book states that the area within Namhansanseong is known for making the soup well. The ingredients for the soup are inner parts of Napa cabbage, and "kongnamul" (soybean sprouts), mushrooms, galbi, sea cucumber, and abalone. They are mixed together with "tojang" (fermented bean paste) and are simmered thoroughly for a day. The cooked soup is then put into a "hangari" or earthen crock covered with a pad of cotton and sent to Seoul at night. When the dawn bell rings the time, the soup is delivered to a house of high-ranking officials. The "hangari" is still warm and the soup is very good for relieving hangovers. The record suggests that "hyojonggaeng" is either the first delivery food to cure a hangover after a banquet held by "jaesang" was ended or was used as a bribe.
Served as Viceroy of Silla. Upon the death of Heungdeok of Silla in 836, a succession struggle erupted between Kim Gyunjeong and his nephew, Kim Jeryung (?–838), Ujing and his follower, Kim Yang supported Gyunjeong while Kim Myeong and Kim Rihong stood by Jeryung. Jeryung's party succeeded and Gyunjeong was killed, Jeryung becoming King Huigang. Kim Yang escaped, but Ujing did not. Following the coup and suicide of King Huigang, Kim Myeong took up the throne as King Minae. Kim Yang, who was then concealing himself on a mountain near the capital, heard the news and raised up an army to go to Cheonghaejin. He told Ujing of these events and persuaded him to have his revenge. Ujing and Kim Yang asked Jang Bogo to help him to take advantage of the confusion of the country and to make himself a king. Jang Bogo agreed and had his friend Jeong Nyeon also follow Ujing. In 839, Ujing, Kim Yang and their followers defeated King Minae's army at the battle of Daegu and quickly advanced upon the capital. All the king's aides then ran away leaving the king behind, so the king hid himself in a villa near the royal palace. Soldiers came into the palace and searched for the king. Finally, they found the king in the villa and killed him in spite of his pleas. Kim Rihong was also killed. Ujing then placed himself on the throne as King Sinmu. Known to have orchestrated Jang Bogo's assassination in 846 (or 841) through Yeom Moon, as Jang received a high position and began conspiring against the King.
With the success of this first film, Kim was able to direct his second feature, the historical costume drama "Yangsan Province" (also 1955), again using primitive equipment obtained from the U.S.I.S. Although Kim claimed to have based the film on a traditional song he learned from his mother, no exact source for the story has been found. It is suspected that the director made up the story himself, modeling it on traditional stories such as "Chunhyangjeon", Lee Kyu-hwan's remake of which had recently become a major success, stimulating a rebirth in Korean cinema. After Lee's "Chunhyangjeon", "Yangsan Province" was the second most successful Korean film of 1955. Though a popular success, critics of the time were not kind to "Yangsan Province". Yoo Do-yeon called the film a "work of bad taste," and Heo Baek-nyeon said that it "debases the dignity of Korean cinema." As his only surviving film of the 1950s, "Yangsan Province" sheds considerable light on Kim Ki-young's early career. In an era in which Korean film critics considered realism to be important, the now-lost ending to "Yangsan Province", in which two dead lovers ascend to heaven on a beam of light, was harshly criticized. In light of Kim's later career, critics today believe that this cut scene displays some of the most recognizable characteristics of Kim's mature style such as an interest in the fantastic, and a jarring blending of genres. Other motifs that were to be explored in depth in Kim's later work can also be found in "Yangsan Province", such as animal imagery, particularly the use of hens as a representation of fertility and sexuality.