Synonyms for octopush or Related words with octopush

finswimming              racketball              trapshooting              wakeskating              spearfishing              kneeboarding              bodyboarding              polocrosse              ringette              broomball              freediving              wakeboarding              kiteboarding              cammag              paddleball              sailboarding              bodysurfing              wallyball              bobsledding              tiddlywinks              skimboarding              sportscotland              wasac              waterski              cuesports              footvolley              snorkelling              waterskiing              footbal              sandboarding              cuju              ncrfu              powerboating              skiffing              kitesurfing              skandalopetra              kilikiti              oztag              iwga              waterpolo              snuba              poolplayers              kickball              knzb              shinty              footbag              watersports              windsurfing              aquathlon              cacac             



Examples of "octopush"
British Octopush Association (BOA) is the governing body for underwater hockey (also known as Octopush) in the United Kingdom (UK).
Its members include the British Finswimming Association, British Octopush Association and British Spearfishing Association.
In Asia, the game first came to the Philippines in the late 1970s through the scuba diving community that became aware of Octopush.
Hoci Tanddwr Cymreig Underwater Hockey Wales (HTC/UHW) is responsible for underwater hockey (also known as Octopush) in Wales. It is the association representing British Octopush Association (BOA) clubs based in Wales. It has seven member clubs. HTC/UHW is affiliated to the Welsh Association of Sub Aqua Clubs – the national governing body for underwater sports in Wales, comprising scuba diving, underwater hockey and snorkelling.
Eastney was the first venue for a new game called Octopush invented by Alan Blake. Blake was a founder-member of the newly formed Southsea Sub-Aqua Club and he and other divers including John Ventham, Jack Willis, and Frank Lilleker first played this game in Eastney Swimming Pool in 1954. Octopush was originally created to keep new divers of the sub-aqua club both active and in attendance at the club over the colder, non-diving (and therefore boring) winter months. Originally called Octopush, and still known locally by that name in the United Kingdom today, the sport is now more widely known as Underwater Hockey. The original rules called for teams of eight players (hence "octo-"), a bat reminiscent of a tiny shuffleboard stick called a "pusher" (hence the "-push"), an uncoated lead puck called a "squid", and a goal known at first as a "cuttle" but soon thereafter a "gulley". Apart from 'pusher' and to a lesser extent 'Octopush' much of this original terminology is now consigned to history. 60 years on and Underwater hockey is now played around the world and competed at regional and national levels, and also at international levels with regular zone and world championships. Southsea Octopush Club maintains a high (often top) ranking within the UK, whilst Great Britain has mixed fortunes on the international stage.
Although WASAC is responsible for underwater hockey (also known as Octopush), training and management of Wales national squads is controlled by Hoci Tanddwr Cymreig Underwater Hockey Wales (HTC UHW).
The branch is currently located in the basement of the Seymour Leisure Centre in Marylebone, central London. The branch meets weekly at 7pm on Tuesdays and retires to the Harcourt Arms nearby after training or playing Octopush in the swimming pool.
The first Octopush competition between clubs was a three-way tournament between teams from Southsea, Bournemouth and Brighton in early 1955. Southsea won then, and they are still highly ranked at national level today (they won again in 2009 and 2012).
The British Sub Aqua Club is the National Governing Body of sub aquatic, or underwater sports, in Wales, comprising scuba diving, underwater hockey and snorkelling. Although BSAC is responsible for underwater hockey (also known as Octopush), training and management of Welsh national squads is controlled by Hoci Tanddwr Cymreig Underwater Hockey Wales.
An Octopush or underwater hockey match is presided over by two or three water referees in the pool, a chief referee on deck, and at least one timekeeper and one scorekeeper. Additional timekeepers can be used to track penalty times in highly contested matches. A tournament referee will arbitrate for chief referees, whilst protests will be adjudicated by at least three independent referees.
In April the pool was functioning as a solar heated indoor pool. The alterations cost $110,000. The pool was also open to the public after hours. Octopush (underwater hockey), waterpolo, Aqua-Aerobics, Canoeing, swimming lessons and practical Lifesaving were all activities undertaken in the pool.
Underwater Hockey (UWH), also known as Octopush (mainly in the United Kingdom) is a globally played limited-contact sport in which two teams compete to manoeuvre a puck across the bottom of a swimming pool into the opposing team's goal by propelling it with a hockey stick (bat). It originated in England in 1954 when Alan Blake, the founder of the newly formed Southsea Sub-Aqua Club, invented the game he called Octopush as a means of keeping the club's members interested and active over the cold winter months when open-water diving lost its appeal. Underwater Hockey is now played worldwide, with the Confédération Mondiale des Activités Subaquatiques, abbreviated CMAS, as the world governing body. The first Underwater Hockey World Championship was held in Canada in 1980 after a false start in 1979 brought about by international politics and apartheid.
Underwater Hockey was started in the United Kingdom by Alan Blake in 1954. Blake was a founder-member of the newly formed Southsea Sub-Aqua Club and he and other divers including John Ventham, Jack Willis, and Frank Lilleker first played this game in Eastney Swimming Pool, Portsmouth, England. Originally called "Octopush" (and still known locally by that name in the United Kingdom today) the original rules called for teams of eight players (hence "octo-"), a bat reminiscent of a tiny shuffleboard stick called a "pusher" (hence the "-push"), an uncoated lead puck called a "squid", and a goal known at first as a "cuttle" but soon thereafter a "gulley". Apart from 'pusher' and to a lesser extent 'Octopush' much of this original terminology is now consigned to history.
Underwater Hockey, (also called Octopush (mainly in the United Kingdom)) is a globally played limited-contact sport in which two teams compete to manoeuvre a puck across the bottom of a swimming pool into the opposing team's goal by propelling it with a pusher. It originated in England in 1954 when Alan Blake, the founder of the newly formed Southsea Sub-Aqua Club, invented the game he called Octopush as a means of keeping the club's members interested and active over the cold winter months when open-water diving lost its appeal. Underwater Hockey is now played worldwide, with the Confédération Mondiale des Activités Subaquatiques, abbreviated CMAS, as the world governing body. The first Underwater Hockey World Championship was held in Canada in 1980 after a false start in 1979 brought about by international politics and apartheid.
The branch is still based in the basement of the Seymour Leisure Centre in Marylebone, where it has been a tenant of Westminster City Council since 1954. The branch facilities include an onsite compressor, training rooms, equipment room and a rigid-hulled inflatable boat (complete with towing vehicle and trailer). The branch currently has 70 active members and meets weekly at 7pm on Tuesdays and retires to the Harcourt Arms nearby after training or playing octopush in the swimming pool.
The sport spread to Durban, South Africa in the mid/late 1950s by the spearfishermen of the Durban Undersea Club (DUC), when dirty summer seas prevented the young bloods from getting their weekly exercise and excitement. The first games were played in the pool of club member Max Doveton. However it soon became so popular that weekly contests were held in a Municipal pool. The UK's Octopush used a small paddle to push the puck whilst the South Africans used a mini hockey stick. The UK's version prevailed.
The Students' Union offers a range of sports clubs which are administered by the Athletic Union The sports range from traditional team games like athletics, football, rugby union, netball, trampolining, and table tennis to octopush (a form of underwater hockey), lacrosse and pole dancing. Every year, the sailing club enters a team for the annual Cowes Week regatta on the Isle of Wight. There is also a range of extreme sports available, including wakeboarding, surfing, climbing, skiing and snowboarding. As of September 2014 there will be 43 different sports clubs.
Underwater hockey has been played in Australia since 1966. Its introduction is attributed to Norm Leibeck, an Australian who returned from Canada both with Marlene, his Canadian bride, and a recently-acquired knowledge of underwater hockey then known as Octopush. The first Australian Underwater Hockey Championships was held in 1975 at Margaret River, Western Australia as part of the Australian Skindiving Convention (now called the Australian Underwater Championships). A Women’s division was added to the championships in 1981 and a Junior division commenced in 1990.
For the 50th battle of the Roses in 2014, the tournament was hosted at Lancaster, with the event highlighted with marketing across campus with players from all sports to boost morale. Lancaster created a purpose built stadium for first time which hosted both the opening and closing ceremony, as well as fixtures including women's rugby, men's rugby and archery. Wins were taken by Lancaster in sports that have previously been won by York annually, such as Rugby XV 3rds and 2nds, Men's Lacrosse and Badminton. The women's basketball fixture on the Sunday, won by Lancaster, took the university across the threshold needed to win the tournament. Octopush, a form of underwater hockey, was featured for the first time in the 2014 tournament. Bar sports were dominated by Lancaster, taking a whitewash in both pool and darts.
Sport is played between college teams, in tournaments known as cuppers (the term is also used for some non-sporting competitions). In addition to these there are higher standard . Significant focus is given to annual varsity matches played against Cambridge, the most famous of which is The Boat Race, watched by a TV audience of between five and ten million viewers. This outside interest reflects the importance of rowing to many of those within the university. Much attention is given to the termly intercollegiate rowing regattas: Christ Church Regatta, Torpids and Summer Eights. A blue is an award given to those who compete at the university team level in certain sports. As well as traditional sports, there are teams for activities such as Octopush and quidditch.