Synonyms for orlic or Related words with orlic

kehat              kajstura              gussoni              laugwitz              rafii              edelberg              strauer              anversa              vakeva              urbanek              niklason              korpanty              heallen              hoerstrup              wakitani              shinitani              frangogiannis              dezawa              krampera              yndestad              vodyanik              menasche              windrem              couffinhal              spangrude              crackower              assmus              gronthos              tropepe              vierbuchen              kroshus              ildstad              verfullie              radisic              gepstein              wojakowski              liechty              imitola              cobaleda              leor              doetsch              miquerol              sodian              djouad              torcia              hajjar              laywell              cribier              madlambayan              dschietzig             



Examples of "orlic"
WhoIsHostingThis.com is a commercial website providing a web hosting search tool and also reviews and thematic comparisons of hosting providers who pay to have their services advertised. It was launched in 2007 by Stan Schroeder and Gordan Orlic and it was acquired in 2008 by London-based "Quality Nonsense Ltd.", with a subsequent redesign and addition of new features.
MIDletPascal is a Pascal compiler and IDE specifically designed to create software for mobiles. It generates Java bytecode that runs on any Java ME device. In September 2009, Niksa Orlic, who wrote MIDletPascal, transmitted the source code to the Russian Boolean.name development community for feature development. MIDletPascal is now open-source, and hosted at SourceForge.
In the 1550s the majority of the Orlić clan emigrated to Krbava in modern-day Croatia. They fled from the onslaught of the Ottoman Empire. In 1638, a number of the Orlic clan relocated further north west to Brinje to the villages of Draškovica and Vodoteć where they lived, tax free, defending the Austro-Hungarian empire from the Ottomans. Nowadays, members of the Orlić clan are found all across the former Yugoslavia.
WhoIsHostingThis.com was launched in 2007 by Stan Schroeder (currently the European editor at Mashable) and Gordan Orlic. Its initial design, intended simple and effective, comprised only a central search box, offering the 'Find a Host' service. In 2008, it was acquired by "Quality Nonsense Ltd.", a London-based company that runs a network of sites for webmasters. The website was subsequently redesigned in order to include additional features, like reviews, forum, blog, coupons, while keeping the area not cluttered.
To convert Radonjic in Radonić must be seen with intense Magyarization policy of Serbian population in the second half of the 19th century when the Serbian surname 'reduce' to 'ic' and 'vic' and end with the most on 'ov'. So Petrovic becomes Petrov and Markovic Markov. So it's the same surname Radonjic and Radonić because neither conceptually nor etymologically do not have a name or term basis with "radon", which has a meaning in the Serbian language. Above said is true for the surname Radonić from Orlic in Dalmatia.
In 1865 at his Cetinje-based "Orlic" Jovan published his poem dedicated to Prince Nikola, the "Montenegrin National anthem", a proposition for an anthem of the newly arising Montenegrin realm. In 1870 on Lučindan it was for the first time publicly sang accompanied with lyrics. It was sung in the rooms of the Cetinje Reading Room the Serb Vocal Society "Unity" from Kotor of Petar II Petrović Njegoš. The bandmaster was the choirmaster of the Czech Society Antun Shultz. The next day, on the 18th of October 1870, the poem was under its new name "To Our Beautiful Montenegro" handed over to Nikola I, who used it as the state anthem of Montenegro until its statehood was extinguished with the unification of Yugoslavia. The Montenegrin composer Jovan Đurov Ivanišević adapted the music better in 1887 in his published songs in Prague. It was then, by the order of the Ministry of Education, proclaimed as the only state anthem. After the recognition of an independent Princedom of Montenegro at the 1878 Congress of Berlin, "To Our Beautiful Montenegro" became a standard protocol song in Cetinje.