Synonyms for pichard or Related words with pichard

deprez              porchet              aeschlimann              guimond              duboc              froidevaux              mazier              huyghe              peschanski              benichou              pierron              bouillot              charrier              wolz              keppens              legras              gougeon              guenet              jaillon              fournel              lelievre              benech              henrion              desgranges              faucher              vilgrain              millasseau              sicotte              mermoud              toutain              bourquin              weger              boutillier              burlet              fievet              duriez              cuenod              duflos              marguet              cazenave              boisvert              maurage              rivoire              ledent              lanctot              cruaud              leleu              carette              cloarec              godfroid             



Examples of "pichard"
Ocle Pichard, a section of Ocle, derived its additional name from a family which arrived soon after the Norman Conquest. Roger Pichard was mentioned in the Book of Fees during the reign of Henry III. Miles Picard, knight of the shire, was High Sheriff of Herefordshire in 1300–06. A Roger Picard, probably his son, served in the same capacity during the period of 1318-27, while the vicar John Pichard served Ocle Pychard's parish in 1446.
Julie Pichard du Page (born 6 October 1973) is a Canadian actress and model.
Pichard is a French surname. Notable people with the surname include:
2. R.A. Jalabert, J.-L. Pichard, C.W.J. Beenakker, Universal Quantum Signatures of Chaos in Ballistic Transport, arXiv:cond-mat/9403073v1
In 1985, comic-book artist Georges Pichard adapted the text into a graphic novel titled "Les Sorcières de Thessalie".
Françoise Pichard (born 2 November 1941 in Lion-en-Sullias), also known as Chard and Pscharr, is a French far-right political cartoonist and illustrator of children books.
"Buddhist monasteries in Tibet" in P. Pichard and F. Lagirarde (eds.), The Buddhist Monastery. A cross -cultural legacy. EFEO (Ecole Française d'Extrême-Orient) Paris, 2003, 283-304.
Georges Pichard (January 17, 1920 – June 7, 2003) was a French comics artist, known for numerous magazine covers, serial publications and albums, stereotypically featuring partially exposed voluptuous women.
French scholar Alex Pichard has argued that TV series enjoyed a Second Golden Age in the 2000s which was a combination of three elements: first, an improvement in both visual aesthetics and storytelling; second, an overall homogeneity between cable series and networks series; and third, a tremendous popular success. Alexis Pichard contends that this Second Golden Age was the result of a revolution initiated by the traditional networks in the 1980s and carried on by the cable channels (especially HBO) in the 1990s.
Less scrutinized for its erotic emphasis are the collaborations Pichard did with science-fiction author Jean-Pierre Andrevon, "La Reserve" and "Édouard" from 1974 and "Ceux–là" from 1977, published in "Charlie Mensuel".
Having collaborated with Danie Dubos on the more daring "Lolly-strip" which was serialised in "Le Rire" in 1966, Pichard and Lob began work within the erotic genre of comics as "Blanche Épiphanie" started serial publication in "V Magazine" in 1968. There was significant public reaction as this character acted outside the moral boundaries of the times, and at one point emulated Jane Fonda by going to Vietnam. This period saw Pichard develop his style of shaping his female heroines into tall, well-endowed women with excessive eyeliner make-up to create a gothic appearance.
Pichard continued to push the moral boundaries when he collaborated with Georges Wolinski to create a yet more controversial series featuring an eponymous character, "Paulette", which began serial publication in "Charlie Mensuel" in 1970. This development became a target of right-wing politicians of that period, Jean Royer and Michel Debre. Continuing in this genre, Pichard reunited with Danie Dubos to produce "Caroline Choléra" which was serialised in "L'Écho des savanes" in 1975. Upon publication of "Marie-Gabrielle de Saint-Eutrope" in 1977, the explicit nature of Pichard's work led to a ban from bookshops and kiosks.
The premiere took place on 22 February 1907 at the Circle Music Hall of the French Photographic Society in Paris, featuring Micheline Kahn (harp), Philippe Gaubert (flute), M. Pichard (clarinet), and the Quartet Firmin Touche, all under the direction of Charles Domergue.
The estate was acquired in 1643 by Charles le Guerin, Lord of Coutet, a counselor at the Bordeaux parliament. In 1695 he passed the estate on to his nephew, Jean le Pichard, whose descendants owned Coutet until 1788. It was at this time that the former US president Thomas Jefferson noted Coutet as the best Sauternes originating from Barsac.
Celtic Wedding is an album of traditional Breton music performed by the Irish band The Chieftains. The album features guest performances by the Breton artists, Nolwenn Monjarrret, Bernard Pichard, Alain Guerton and Michel Bertae. Nolwen Monjarret later appeared on the Chieftains' album, "The Bells of Dublin", performing "A Breton Carol" with the band.
available in English translation as "Three Medieval Greek Romances: Velthandros and Chrysandza, Kallimachos and Chrysorroi, Livistros and Rodamni," translated by Gavin Betts, Garland Library of Medieval Literature, 98 (B), (New York & London: Garland Publishing, Inc. 1995). One of them is available in French: M Pichard, "Le roman de Callimaque et de Chrysorrhoé: Texte établi et traduit," (Paris: 1956).
"Dictionnaire des lettres françaises" volume 1, "Le moyen âge", by Georges François-Xavier Marie Grente, Robert Bossuat, Louis Pichard, and Guy Raynaud de Lage. Revised by Michel Zink and Geneviève Hasenohr-Esnos. Paris: Le Livre de Poche / Fayard, 1992. Also 1994 edition "Ed. entièrement revue et mise à jour sous la dir. de Geneviève Hasenohr."
Toward the end of his life, Pichard adapted classic erotic stories such as "Les Exploits d'un jeune Don Juan" by Guillaume Apollinaire, "The Kama-Sutra" by Vatsyayana, "Trois filles de leur mère" by Pierre Louÿs, "La Religieuse" by Denis Diderot and "Germinal" by Émile Zola.
After studying advertising at the Duperré School of Applied Arts in Paris, Beauchard began working in comics in 1985 ("Pas de samba pour capitaine Tonnerre"), and wrote and illustrated stories in numerous magazines, including "Okapi", "À suivre", "Tintin Reporter", and "Chic". His distinctive black-and-white style was influenced by Georges Pichard and Jacques Tardi, among others.
Jesse Pickard Tripp (7 May 1883 – 6 September 1971) was a Canadian politician serving in municipal, provincial and federal governments. He was born in Forest, Ontario and became a pharmacist by career. His name also appears as Jesse Pichard Tripp or Jesse Picard Tripp in some sources.