Synonyms for ponseti or Related words with ponseti

feldenkrais              gonstead              buteyko              clubfoot              cecchetti              tessys              hakomi              nonsurgical              psychosurgery              hondt              hypnotherapy              osteopathy              proctology              orthopedists              bobath              barraquer              bunionectomy              orthopedist              chiropractor              osteopaths              abulcasis              hbot              hahnemann              homeopath              equinovarus              acalculous              malariotherapy              rheumatologist              podiatric              coccydynia              acupuncturists              phlebology              microdiskectomy              chiropractors              transorbital              naturopathic              indivisibles              physiatrist              homeopathy              dentofacial              chiropractic              wubihua              talipes              podiatry              rotationplasty              allopathic              geriatrician              transtibial              otology              gastroenterologist             



Examples of "ponseti"
It is currently hosted by former Valencia goalkeeper Santiago Cañizares and the journalist José Antonio Ponseti.
Achilles tenotomy is commonly used as part of the Ponseti Method of treatment of clubfoot
University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics is also where Dr. Ignacio Ponseti developed the Ponseti method. The Ponseti method is a revolutionary non-surgical way to treat congenital clubfoot, which had previously been treated through surgeries to infants or children at a young age. The Ponseti method is a way to treat clubfoot through a series of manipulating bones and tendons in the foot and holding them in place through a series of casts. It is a treatment technique that is still used worldwide to this day. More information on it can be found on UI Children's website, the World Health Organisation website, and many other places.
The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics is also where Dr. Ignacio Ponseti developed the Ponseti method. The Ponseti method is a revolutionary non-surgical way to treat congenital clubfoot, which had previously been treated through surgeries to infants or children at a young age. The Ponseti method is a way to treat clubfoot through a series of manipulating bones and tendons in the foot and holding them in place through a series of casts. It is a treatment technique that is still used worldwide to this day. More information on it can be found on UI Children's website, the World Health Organisation website, and many other places.
Ponseti studied medicine at Barcelona University. Not long after he graduated, fighting broke out between the Nationalists and the Republicans - the start of the Spanish Civil War. Ponseti served as a medical officer with the Loyalists as a lieutenant, then captain, in the Orthopaedic and Fracture Service. His duties included setting fractures, which put him on a career in orthopaedics. Without ambulances, Ponseti used the help of local smugglers to take the injured into France.
World Clubfoot Day was introduced in 2013 by Ponseti International Association and is celebrated on June 3 every year. This date was chosen following the signing of the Iowa Clubfoot Declaration during the 2nd International Clubfoot Symposium held in Iowa City, Iowa, USA, on October 4 – 5, 2012. The date commemorates the birthday of Dr. Ignacio Ponseti, M.D. (1914-2009), the developer of the Ponseti Method to treat clubfoot.
The Ponseti International Association for the Advancement of Clubfoot Treatment was founded in 2006 at the University of Iowa. The Ponseti International Association aims to improve the treatment of children born with clubfoot through education, research and improved access to care.
He soon escaped to France himself and went to Mexico, where for two years he practiced family medicine. A physician there helped Ponseti get to Iowa in 1941 to study orthopaedics under Arthur Steindler, M.D. Ponseti completed a residency at Iowa in 1944 and became a member of the orthopaedic faculty at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.
In the 1950s Ignacio Ponseti developed the Ponseti Method (also known as the Ponseti Technique), its a non-surgical technique that uses a series of casts, followed by an abduction brace, to correct congenital clubfoot. The condition causes a baby's feet to turn inward and downward; if not corrected, a child is unable to walk or move properly. He was known for this method of clubfoot treatment that bears his name and was Professor Emeritus in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.
Ponseti treatment was introduced in UK in the late 1990s and widely popularized around the country by NHS physiotherapist Steve Wildon.
The Ponseti International Association for the Advancement of Clubfoot Treatment was founded in 2006 to improve the treatment of children born with clubfoot through education, research and improved access to care. PIA has a related Web site devoted to the interests and needs of parents. Groups that work with Ponseti International include CURE International and A Leg to Stand On (India)and Pehla Qadam (one of the organizations in Pakistan).
Ignacio Ponseti (3 June 1914 – 18 October 2009) was a Spanish physician, specializing in orthopedics. He was born on 3 June 1914 in Menorca, part of the Balearic Islands, Spain, Ponseti was the son of a watchmaker and helped repair watches. The skill was said to eventually contribute to his abilities as an orthopedist. He fled Spain during the Spanish Civil War and became a faculty member and practicing physician at the University of Iowa.
In addition to the improved physical outcomes, compared to surgery, the Ponseti method is less expensive and can be taught to nonphysician health care providers, which is useful in areas with few or no doctors. Nearly 80 percent of children born with clubfoot live in impoverished nations. The Ponseti method is used, for example, in Uganda, where efforts continue to improve the availability of the treatment.
The Ponseti method is a manipulative technique that corrects congenital clubfoot without invasive surgery. It was developed by Dr. Ignacio V. Ponseti of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, USA in the 1950s, and was repopularized in 2000 by Dr. John Herzenberg in the USA and Europe and in Africa by NHS surgeon Steve Mannion. It is a standard for the treatment of club foot.
Helena Percas de Ponseti was a writer, essayist, scholar, and professor. She received her undergraduate degree from the Institut Maintenon in Paris, France, her Master's Degree from Barnard College and her Doctorate from Columbia University in New York.
Well into his nineties, Ponseti continued to see patients and trained visiting doctors from around the world. He also developed new prosthetic devices with John Mitchell of MD Orthotics and produced training and information DVD's on the method.
Information about the use of Ponseti method can be found at these sites: World Health Organisation, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America, STEPS Charity UK and STEPS Charity South Africa.
The paper was founded by James Ekenstedt, Caroline Ponseti, and Evan Katz during their sophomore year at Rhodes College. It is the first street newspaper run entirely by college students.
Congenital foot deformities may be readily identified, "e.g." club foot (talipes equino varus). Currently the‘gold-standard’ treatment choice for club feet is the Ponseti method. Other treatment options include the French Functional method or a combination of the two methods and some treatment centers also use Botox treatments. Maintaining the correction is challenging as relapses occurs in up to 37% of the feet treated with the Ponseti method and 29% of feet treated with the French Functional method. Surgery are therefore used as a last resort option with recurring club feet presentation. The Ponseti method is used across the globe in both developed and developing countries (where many aid programs, such as "Walk for Life" train local health professionals). Congenital foot appearance may also be indicative of a genetic condition; a wider space between the first and second toes with associated skin creasing may be found with Down’s syndrome (trisomy 21).
The goal of World Clubfoot Day is to raise awareness about clubfoot disability and its prevention using the Ponseti Method, a non-surgical treatment that includes gentle manipulation of the feet followed by the application of plaster casts and temporary bracing. Clubfoot is the most common musculoskeletal birth deformity, affecting 200,000 newborn children each year, 80% in developing countries. There are also hundreds of thousands of children and young adults who are living with this debilitating condition worldwide. The Ponseti Method is nearly 100% effective when properly applied by a trained health care provider and is considered the "gold standard" treatment, leading to a normal, productive life.