Synonyms for postinfectious or Related words with postinfectious

nonsuppurative              pneumonocirrhosis              collagenosis              granulomatosa              poststreptococcal              pleuritis              angiocholecystitis              hypophysitis              sclerodermia              lipophagic              symphatica              tracheitis              fibromyositis              glomerulo              spondylarthritis              sialadenitis              humeroscapularis              throiditis              bronchocentric              scleromyxedema              chorioretinitis              lymphangitis              eruthematosus              thyreoiditis              malacoplakia              dacryoadenitis              serositis              parotitis              myosititis              entrerocolitis              valvulitis              cosinophilic              factoriggrheumatoid              leukocytoclastic              urocystitis              pleurisy              episcleritis              nongranulomatous              glomerulpnephritis              aveolitis              meningoradiculitis              cholangiolitis              scieroderma              retinochoroiditis              psoriatica              endophthalmia              polymalgia              tuberculous              dermatomyositits              cholecystitis             



Examples of "postinfectious"
"S. pyogenes" can also cause disease in the form of postinfectious "nonpyogenic" (not associated with local bacterial multiplication and pus formation) syndromes. These autoimmune-mediated complications follow a small percentage of infections and include rheumatic fever and acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis. Both conditions appear several weeks following the initial streptococcal infection. Rheumatic fever is characterised by inflammation of the joints and/or heart following an episode of streptococcal pharyngitis. Acute glomerulonephritis, inflammation of the renal glomerulus, can follow streptococcal pharyngitis or skin infection.
There are indications that HHV-7 can contribute to the development of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, encephalopathy, hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome, hepatitis infection, postinfectious myeloradiculoneuropathy, pityriasis rosea, and the reactivation of HHV-4, leading to "mononucleosis-like illness".
IBS can be classified as either diarrhea-predominant (IBS-D), constipation-predominant (IBS-C), or with alternating stool pattern (IBS-A) or pain-predominant. In some individuals, IBS may have an acute onset and develop after an infectious illness characterized by two or more of: fever, vomiting, diarrhea, or positive stool culture. This postinfective syndrome has consequently been termed "postinfectious IBS" (IBS-PI).
Acute cerebellar ataxia of childhood is a childhood condition characterized by an unsteady gait, most likely secondary to an autoimmune of postinfectious cause, drug induced or paraneoplastic. Most common virus causing acute cerebellar ataxia are Chickenpox virus and Epstein Barr Virus. It is a diagnosis of exclusion.
Swyer–James syndrome is a manifestation of postinfectious obliterative bronchiolitis. In SJS, the involved lung or portion of the lung does not grow normally and is slightly smaller than the opposite lung. The characteristic radiographic appearance is that of pulmonary hyperlucency, caused by overdistention of the alveoli in conjunction with diminished arterial flow. and has been linked to adenovirus type 21.
LTA can be considered a virulence factor that has an important role in infections and in postinfectious sequelae caused by Gram-positive bacteria. The development of effective antibiotics killing the bacteria without lysing them and multidrug strategies to attenuate LTA-induced secretion of proinflammatory agonists is of great importance to combat septic shock and multiorgan failure caused by Gram-positive bacteria.
Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (also known as "Acute hemorrhagic edema of childhood", "Finkelstein's disease", "Infantile postinfectious iris-like purpura and edema", "Medallion-like purpura", "Purpura en cocarde avec oedema" and "Seidlmayer syndrome") is a skin condition that affects children under the age of two with a recent history of upper respiratory illness, a course of antibiotics, or both. The disease was first described in 1938 by Finkelstein and later by Seidlmayer as “Seidlmayer cockade purpura”.
Acute proliferative glomerulonephritis is a disorder of the glomeruli (glomerulonephritis), or small blood vessels in the kidneys. It is a common complication of bacterial infections, typically skin infection by "Streptococcus" bacteria types 12, 4 and 1 (impetigo) but also after streptococcal pharyngitis, for which it is also known as "postinfectious" or poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. It can be a risk factor for future albuminuria. In adults, the signs and symptoms of infection may still be present at the time when the kidney problems develop, and the terms infection-related glomerulonephritis or bacterial infection-related glomerulonephritis are also used. Acute glomerulonephritis resulted in 19,000 deaths in 2013 down from 24,000 deaths in 1990.
Hemorrhagic complications are more common in the immunocompromised or immunosuppressed populations, although healthy children and adults have been affected. Five major clinical syndromes have been described: febrile purpura, malignant chickenpox with purpura, postinfectious purpura, purpura fulminans, and anaphylactoid purpura. These syndromes have variable courses, with febrile purpura being the most benign of the syndromes and having an uncomplicated outcome. In contrast, malignant chickenpox with purpura is a grave clinical condition that has a mortality rate of greater than 70%. The cause of these hemorrhagic chickenpox syndromes is not known.
After a respiratory tract infection has cleared, the person may be left with a postinfectious cough. This typically is a dry, non-productive cough that produces no phlegm. Symptoms may include a tightness in the chest, and a tickle in the throat. This cough may often persist for weeks after an illness. The cause of the cough may be inflammation similar to that observed in repetitive stress disorders such as carpal tunnel syndrome. The repetition of coughing produces inflammation which produces discomfort, which in turn produces more coughing. Postinfectious cough typically does not respond to conventional cough treatments. Treatment consists of any anti-inflammatory medicine (such as ipratropium) to treat the inflammation, and a cough suppressant to reduce frequency of the cough until inflammation clears. Inflammation may increase sensitivity to other existing issues such as allergies, and treatment of other causes of coughs (such as use of an air purifier or allergy medicines) may help speed recovery. A bronchodilator, which helps open up the airways, may also help treat this type of cough.
In June 1970 the FDA announced its conclusions on the effectiveness of certain anabolic steroid drugs, including stanozolol, based on the NAS/NRC reports made under DESI. The drugs were classified as probably effective as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of senile and postmenopausal osteoporosis but only as an adjunct, and in pituitary dwarfism (with a specific caveat for dwarfism, "until growth hormone is more available"), and as lacking substantial evidence of effectiveness for several other indications. Specifically, the FDA found a lack of efficacy for stanozolol as "an adjunct to promote body tissue-building processes and to reverse tissue-depleting processes in such conditions as malignant diseases and chronic nonmalignant diseases; debility in elderly patients, and other emaciating diseases; gastrointestinal disorders resulting in alterations of normal metabolism; use during pre-operative and postoperative periods in undernourished patients and poor-risk surgical cases due to traumatism; use in infants, children, and adolescents who do not reach an adequate weight; supportive treatment to help restore or maintain a favorable metabolic balance, as in postsurgical, postinfectious, and convalescent patients; of value in pre- operative patients who have lost tissue from a disease process or who have associated symptoms, such as anorexia; retention and utilization of calcium; surgical applications; gastrointestinal disease, malnourished adults, and chronic illness; pediatric nutritional problems; prostatic carcinoma; and endocrine deficiencies." The FDA gave Sterling six months to stop marketing stanozolol for the indications for which there was no evidence for efficacy, and one year to submit further data for the two indications for which it found probable efficacy.
Drugs affecting serotonin (5-HT) in the intestines can help reduce symptoms. On the other hand, many IBS-D patients report that SSRI type medications exacerbate spasms and diarrhea. This is thought to be due to the large number of serotonin receptors in the gut. 5HT3 antagonists such as ondansetron are effective in postinfectious IBS and diarrhea-dominant IBS due to their blockade of serotonin on 5HT3 receptors in the gut; the reason for their benefit is believed to be that excessive serotonin in the gut is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of some subtypes of IBS. Certain atypical antipsychotic medications, such as clozapine and olanzapine, may also provide relief due to serotonergic properties these agents possess, acting on the same receptors as other medications in this specific category. Benefits may include reduced diarrhea, reduced abdominal cramps, and improved general well-being. Any nausea present may also respond to 5HT3 antagonists owing to their antiemetic properties. Serotonin stimulates the gut motility and so agonists can help constipation-predominant irritable bowel, while antagonists can help diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, SSRIs, frequently prescribed for panic and/or anxiety disorder and depression, affect serotonin in the gut, as well as the brain. The bowels are highly dependent on serotonin for neural communication. "Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants seem to promote global well-being in some patients with irritable bowel syndrome and, possibly, some improvement in abdominal pain and bowel symptoms, but this effect appears to be independent of improved depression. Further research is required."