Synonyms for postperfusion or Related words with postperfusion

heelp              postconcussion              psychoorganic              keutel              ivermark              seziary              karteneger              myoglobinuria              glantzmann              pudlak              aarskog              homocysteinemia              siogren              sopite              cardiorenal              fibromyalgic              aerotoxic              dysexecutive              hydrolethalus              myelodisplastic              hyperhyrosis              spondylitissjogren              thrombopenia              inagentsadults              shireenzymefor              prader              hyperammonemia              acrocallosal              myeloplastic              leucodystrophies              preexitation              skoptic              hyperinsulinism              postthrombotic              aagenaes              twiddler              congential              angiospastic              hepatorenal              exertional              thromboesthinia              hyperviscocity              childrenages              cardiofacial              rhabdomyolysis              sulfatidoses              hypokeratosis              sjogrens              postphlebitic              hypokalaemia             



Examples of "postperfusion"
Vasoplegic syndrome (VPS) is a postperfusion syndrome characterized by low systemic vascular resistance and a high cardiac output.
Postperfusion syndrome, also known as "pumphead", is a constellation of neurocognitive impairments attributed to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) during cardiac surgery. Symptoms of postperfusion syndrome are subtle and include defects associated with attention, concentration, short term memory, fine motor function, and speed of mental and motor responses. Studies have shown a high incidence of neurocognitive deficit soon after surgery, but the deficits are often transient with no permanent neurological impairment.
Physicians have theorized that the syndrome is caused by tiny debris and air bubbles (microemboli) that enter the brain via cardiopulmonary bypass. Surgeons attempt to minimize time spent on bypass to decrease postoperative deficits; studies have shown increased bypass time is associated with increased incidence and severity of postperfusion syndrome and mortality. It is unclear how increases in bypass time would result in such increases if pre-existing cardiovascular and cerebrovascular conditions are the principal causative mechanisms of postperfusion syndrome.
Some researchers believe that the off-pump approach results in fewer post-operative complications, such as postperfusion syndrome, and better overall results. Study results are controversial as of 2007, the surgeon's preference and hospital results still play a major role.
Postperfusion syndrome has attracted some public notoriety following the coronary bypasses of former U.S. President Bill Clinton and Vice-President Dick Cheney. Using the NEJM article discussed above to provide credibility to the claim.
The development of cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass techniques has reduced the mortality rates of these surgeries to relatively low ranks. For instance, repairs of congenital heart defects are currently estimated to have 4–6% mortality rates. A major concern with cardiac surgery is the incidence of neurological damage. Stroke occurs in 2–3% of all people undergoing cardiac surgery, and is higher in patients at risk for stroke. A more subtle complication of neurocognitive deficits attributed to cardiopulmonary bypass is known as postperfusion syndrome, sometimes called "pumphead". The symptoms of postperfusion syndrome were initially felt to be permanent, but were shown to be transient with no permanent neurological impairment.
The development of cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass techniques has reduced the mortality rates of these surgeries to relatively low ranks. For instance, repairs of congenital heart defects are currently estimated to have 4–6% mortality rates. A major concern with cardiac surgery is the incidence of neurological damage. Stroke occurs in 5% of all people undergoing cardiac surgery, and is higher in patients at risk for stroke. A more subtle constellation of neurocognitive deficits attributed to cardiopulmonary bypass is known as postperfusion syndrome, sometimes called "pumphead". The symptoms of postperfusion syndrome were initially felt to be permanent, but were shown to be transient with no permanent neurological impairment.
Heparin coating is reported to result in similar characteristics to the native endothelium. It has been shown to inhibit intrinsic coagulation, inhibit host responses to extracorporeal circulation, and lessen postperfusion, or “pumphead,” syndrome. Several studies have examined the clinical efficacy of these oxygenators.
Off-pump coronary artery bypass was developed partly to avoid the complications of cardiopulmonary bypass during cardiac surgery. The medical community believes cardiopulmonary bypass causes a post-operative cognitive decline known as postperfusion syndrome (informally called "pumphead"), but research has shown no long-term difference between on and off pump coronary artery bypass in patients of lower risk. This is probably because the pump is not the main cause of brain damage at all, rather it is the embolic process described below.