Synonyms for pskov_governorate or Related words with pskov_governorate

novgorod_governorate              uyezd              vologda_governorate              olonets_governorate              tver_governorate              vologda_viceroyalty              novgorod_viceroyalty              opochka              tver_viceroyalty              bezhetsky              volost              pskov_viceroyalty              novotorzhsky              arkhangelsk_governorate              kazan_governorate              uyezds              kalinin_oblast              tosnensky_districts              ustyuzhensky_uyezd              saint_petersburg_governorate              smolensk_governorate              zubtsovsky              nevelsky              kargopolsky_uyezd              irkutsk_governorate              erivan_governorate              vesyegonsky              okruha              volosts              kemsky_uyezd              kolsky_uyezd              kherson_governorate              starorussky_uyezd              velikoluksky              kashinsky              mogilev_governorate              kimrsky              toropetsky              sebezhsky              domanivka              novgorodsky_uyezd              odessa_oblast              vyborg_governorate              voblast              voronezh_governorate              guberniya              baranavichy_voblast              leningrad_oblast              berezanka              novorzhevsky             



Examples of "pskov_governorate"
Pskov Governorate has proven to be too big to be administered properly, and in 1776, the decree of the empress, Catherine the Great, was issued. It divided the governorate into Pskov and Polotsk Governorates. Pskov was made the administrative center of Pskov Governorate. In 1777, Pskov Governorate was transformed into Pskov Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and the emperor Paul I issued a decree restoring Pskov Governorate.
In 1777, Pskov Governorate was transformed into Pskov Viceroyalty, which was administered from Novgorod by Jacob Sievers. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and on 31 December 1796 the emperor Paul I issued a decree restoring Pskov Governorate. The area belonged to Toropetsky Uyezd of Pskov Governorate.
Pskov Governorate has proven to be too big to be administered properly, and in 1776, the decree of the empress, Catherine the Great, was issued. It divided the governorate into Pskov and Polotsk Governorates. Pskov was made the administrative center of Pskov Governorate. Gdov and Porkhov were transferred from Novgorod to Pskov Governorate.
In 1924, Velizhsky, Nevelsky, and Sebezhsky Uyezds of Vitebsk Governorate were transferred into Pskov Governorate.
On August 1, 1927 Pskov Governorate was abolished and transferred to Leningrad Oblast.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanlandia Governorate (since 1710 known as Saint Petersburg Governorate), and in 1727 Novgorod Governorate split off. In 1772, as a result of the First Partition of Poland, Pskov Governorate was created, and the area on the right bank of the Western Dvina was included into Toropetsky Uyezd of Pskov Governorate. In 1777, Pskov Governorate was transformed into Pskov Viceroyalty, and in 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and Pskov Governorate was restored.
In 1776 Polotsk Governorate was created after separating from the original Russian lands of Pskov Governorate.
The administration of the governorate was performed by a governor. The governors of Pskov Governorate were
In the mid-14th century the town passed to the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, which had to surrender it to Ivan III following the Battle of Vedrosha in 1503. In the early 17th century, Toropets was ransacked by the Polish army. In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, Toropets was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. Toropets was included into Velikiye Luki Province. In 1772, as a result of the First Partition of Poland, Inflanty Voivodeship and eastern Belarus were transferred to Russia. In order to accommodate these areas, Pskov Governorate was created, and Velikiye Luki was transferred to Pskov Governorate. The town of Opochka was made the administrative center of the governorate. Pskov Governorate has proven to be too big to be administered properly, and in 1776, the decree of the empress, Catherine the Great, was issued. It divided the governorate into Pskov and Polotsk Governorates. Pskov was made the administrative center of Pskov Governorate, and Toropets remained in Pskov Governorate. In 1777, Pskov Governorate was transformed into Pskov Viceroyalty, which was administered from Novgorod by Jacob Sievers. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and on 31 December 1796 the emperor Paul I issued a decree restoring Pskov Governorate. Toropets was the center of Toropetsky Uyezd of Pskov Governorate.
Bogdanovich was born on April 1, 1849 in Nikolskoye, in Toropets Uyezd, Pskov Governorate, into a noble family.
Until 1927, Sebezh was the seat of Sebezhskly Uyezd of Pskov Governorate (of Vitebsk Governorate before 1924).
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, it was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off, and in 1772, Pskov Governorate (which between 1777 and 1796 existed as Pskov Viceroyalty) was established. The area was a part of Velikoluksky Uyezd of Pskov Governorate.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off, and in 1772, Pskov Governorate (which between 1777 and 1796 existed as Pskov Viceroyalty) was established. The area was a part of Pskovsky Uyezd of Pskov Governorate.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off, and in 1772, Pskov Governorate (which between 1777 and 1796 existed as Pskov Viceroyalty) was established. The area was a part of Opochetsky Uyezd of Pskov Governorate.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off, and in 1772, Pskov Governorate (which between 1777 and 1796 existed as Pskov Viceroyalty) was established. The area was a part of Opochetsky Uyezd of Pskov Governorate.
After the First Partition of Poland in 1772 the area was included into newly established Pskov Governorate, a giant administrative unit comprising what is currently Pskov Oblast and a considerable part of Belarus. After 1773, the area belonged to Velizhsky Uyezd of Pskov Governorate. In 1777, it was transferred to Polotsk Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished and the area was transferred to Byelorussia Governorate; since 1802 to Vitebsk Governorate. Between July and October 1812, Velizh was occupied by the army of Napoleon advancing to Moscow. In 1924, Vitebsk Governorate was abolished, and Velizhsky Uyezds was transferred to Pskov Governorate.
After the First Partition of Poland in 1772 the area was included into newly established Pskov Governorate, a giant administrative unit comprising what is currently Pskov Oblast and a considerable part of Belarus. After 1773, the area belonged to Velizhsky Uyezd of Pskov Governorate. In 1777, it was transferred to Polotsk Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished and the area was transferred to Byelorussia Governorate; since 1802 to Vitebsk Governorate. Between July and October 1812, Velizh was occupied by the army of Napoleon advancing to Moscow. In 1924, Vitebsk Governorate was abolished, and Velizhsky Uyezds was transferred to Pskov Governorate.
Pytalovo (the alternative name of which was Novo-Dmitrovskoye) was known as a village in Vyshgorodok volost, Ostrovsky Uyezd, Pskov Governorate since the end of the 18th century. In the course of World War I, in February 1918 the German Army advances on Pskov and Petrograd capturing western part of Pskov Governorate until November when the Red Army retakes it. In May 1919 г. advancing pro-czarist Russian North-Western Army of Gen. Nikolai Yudenich supported by Estonian and Latvian republican units recaptures westernmost part of the Pskov Governorate.
In 1796, Paul I performed a new administrative reform. Kholmsky, Novorzhevsky, and Pechorsky Uyezds were abolished, and the viceroyalty was transformed into Pskov Governorate in the same borders.
Bagotsky was born in Opochka, Pskov Governorate in 1879 to a merchant's family. His father and mother were Polish by birth.