Synonyms for rebiba or Related words with rebiba

iuniore              alferio              passionei              nusco              rainerius              pannocchieschi              vannutelli              albergati              landolfo              paluzzo              allucingoli              bonincontro              garzadoro              scarampi              cinzio              giacopo              boiano              capizucchi              ravaschieri              cobelluzzi              odescalchi              ottobono              costaguti              madruzzo              tagliavia              alderano              carpegna              seripando              filomarino              acerenza              sfondrati              pulzone              gaudentius              marescotti              lavello              clarelli              cavalchini              aragona              richelmy              eustachio              auxilius              ganganelli              opizio              coriolani              gualterio              roccaromana              gianbernardino              scipione              dionigio              grazzano             



Examples of "rebiba"
McFarland's direct Apostolic succession is delineated from Cardinal Scipione Rebiba. 91% of the world's more than 4,000 Catholic bishops alive today trace their episcopal lineage back to Rebiba.
Rebiba was appointed Bishop of Albano on 8 April 1573, and Bishop of Sabina in 1574.
Scipione Rebiba (3 February 1504 – 23 July 1577) was an Italian cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church.
Rebiba was appointed Archbishop of Pisa by Paul IV on 13 April 1556 and took possession of that metropolitan see on 29 April 1556, through a procurator.
Giovanni Domenico Rebiba (died 6 February 1604) was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Catania (1595-1604) and Bishop of Ortona (1570-1595).
Basilio Rinaudo and Salvatore Miracola, "Il cardinale Scipione Rebiba (1504–1577). Vita e azione pastorale di un vescovo riformatore", L'Ascesa, Patti 2007. ISBN 978-88-903039-0-6.
Benedict XIII, whose orders were descended from Scipione Rebiba, personally consecrated at least 139 bishops for various important European sees, including German, French, English and New World bishops. These bishops in turn consecrated bishops almost exclusively for their respective countries causing other episcopal lineages to die. As a result, more than 90% of present-day bishops trace their episcopal lineage through him to Cardinal Rebiba.
More than 95% of the world's more than 5,000 living Western bishops in the Roman Catholic Church, trace their episcopal lineage back to 16th century bishop Scipione Cardinal Rebiba. In the early 18th century, Pope Benedict XIII, whose orders descended from Rebiba, personally consecrated at least 139 bishops for various important European sees, including those in Germany, France, England and the New World. These bishops in turn largely consecrated new bishops in their respective countries, effectively erasing other episcopal lines.
In 1559, after the death of Paul IV (Carafa), the new Pope, Pius IV, authorized a number of arrests of persons accused of various crimes during the administration of Paul IV. Among them were Cardinal Carlo Carafa, the Nephew of Paul IV, and Cardinal Scipione Rebiba. They were sent to the Castel S. Angelo and imprisoned. Cardinal Rebiba was eventually released. Cardinal Carafa was strangled, on orders of Pius IV, on 4 March 1561.
In 2007, it became clear that Uchanski was never part of this succession line. Its roots can be traced back to bishop Claudio Rangoni, who was bishop of Reggio Emilia between 1592 and 1621. He worked as Apostolic Nuncio to Poland from 1598 to 1607. ń Claudio Rangoni belongs to the Rebiba lineage, so the part of Uchański-lineage up of Claudio Rangoni is a branch of the Rebiba lineage.
Another theory is that, he consecrated Scipione Rebiba. More than 5,200 Catholic Bishops today traces back their episcopal lineage to him. But this theory is not proven because there is no sufficient documents for this topic.
Scipione Rebiba was born in the village (borgo, vico) of San Marco d'Alunzio, in Sicily. He studied in Palermo, enjoying a benefice in the Church of S. Maria dei Miracoli.
Rebiba was immediately appointed Governor of Rome (5 July 1555) after his patron, Gian Paolo Carafa, was elected pope on 23 May 1555. He served only a few months, until the next Consistory for the elevation of cardinals.
On February 22, 1549, Cardinal Carafa was named by Pope Paul III to be Archbishop of Naples, but the opposition of the Emperor Charles V prevented him from taking possession of his see until July 1551. Cardinal Carafa, who was active in Rome as one of the six cardinals of the Roman Inquisition (1542-1555), nonetheless retained possession of the See of Naples, and in 1551 appointed his friend Scipio Rebiba as his Vicar to administer the diocese on his behalf. Rebiba was also promoted in the episcopacy to the see of Motula on 12 October 1551. He was thus a bishop of a See in the Kingdom of Naples. With the full support of the head of the Inquisition in Rome, Rebiba introduced the Roman Inquisition into Naples and was granted the office of Commissary of the Roman Inquisition.
On 8 November 1570, Giovanni Domenico Rebiba was appointed during the papacy of Pope Pius V as Bishop of Ortona. On 19 November 1570, he was consecrated bishop by Scipione Rebiba, Cardinal-Priest of Santa Maria in Trastevere, with Nicola Perusco, Bishop of Civita Castellana e Orte, and Francesco Rusticucci, Bishop of Fano, serving as co-consecrators. On 11 December 1595, he was appointed during the papacy of Pope Clement VIII as Bishop of Catania. He served as Bishop of Catania until his death on 6 February 1604.
On 7 October 1566, Rebiba opted for the Church of S. Angelo in Pescheria, but, since the church had the rank of a Deaconry, it was temporarily raised to the rank of a "titulus" of a cardinal priest for his benefit. He continued to administer that church until 3 July 1570, when he opted for the "titulus" of Santa Maria in Trastevere.
In the early 18th century, Pope Benedict XIII, whose holy orders were descended from Rebiba, personally consecrated at least 139 bishops for various important European sees, including German, French, English and New World bishops. These bishops in turn consecrated bishops almost exclusively for their respective countries.
On 24 Jan 1567, he was appointed during the papacy of Pope Pius V as Bishop of Emly. On 7 Oct 1571, he was consecrated bishop by Scipione Rebiba, Cardinal-Priest of Santa Maria in Trastevere. with Umberto Locati, Bishop of Bagnoregio, and Eustachio Locatelli, Bishop of Reggio Emilia, serving as co-consecrators. He served as Bishop of Emly until his death in 1586.
On 3 Oct 1571, Pietro Cancellieri was appointed during the papacy of Pope Pius V as Bishop of Lipari. On 7 Oct 1571, he was consecrated bishop by Scipione Rebiba, Cardinal-Priest of Santa Maria in Trastevere, with Umberto Locati, Bishop of Bagnoregio, Eustachio Locatelli, Bishop of Reggio Emilia, serving as co-consecrators. He served as Bishop of Lipari until his death in 1580.
Rebiba was created a cardinal during the consistory of 20 December 1555. He was assigned the Church of S. Pudenziana, which he held from 24 January 1556 until February 7, 1565, when he was translated to the Church of S. Anastasia. These translations had to do with the prestige of a particular church as well as with its disposable income.