Synonyms for retroscripting or Related words with retroscripting

suitmation              shadowmation              xenochrony              improvisational              rotoscoping              snorricam              headlinese              ventriloquism              drownproofing              cubomania              leitmotifs              arruppadtai              tintinnabuli              stichomythia              gongbi              animatic              wordplay              electronovision              claymation              metahumor              metatheatrical              puppetry              workshopping              cogitraining              squigglevision              merukhand              mythalone              sprechstimme              adequality              parodic              fauxbourdon              storyboarding              hectography              banburismus              asemic              costuming              bomphiologia              chakravala              slapstick              skits              brechtian              puppeteering              punchlines              mockumentaries              hiwaza              metafiction              metafictional              absurdist              gyrokinesis              animatics             



Examples of "retroscripting"
The HBO sitcom "Curb Your Enthusiasm" by Seinfeld co-creator Larry David primarily uses retroscripting and ad lib instead of scripted dialogue.
Each episode features a different cast of special guests besides creators Matarese and Luciano. The show primarily features retroscripting, improvised dialogue based on plot outlines.
Another quality that "Home Movies" carried over from "Dr. Katz" was its initial use of "retroscripting", a process in which an episode's scripts are purposely left vague, and instead of exact dialogue, the plot of a particular scene is merely outlined — the rest of the dialogue is then created through improv by the actors. The use of retroscripting in "Home Movies" gives the show very casual, realistic dialogue with an often dry, sarcastic wit. Although retroscripting was only used officially in the first season (the entire first episode was improvised from start to finish), the dialogue in the following three seasons remained heavily improvised, with the written script serving mainly as a guide or something to fall back on for jokes if needed.
Sellers is said to have improvised much of his dialogue, with Kubrick incorporating the ad-libs into the written screenplay so the improvised lines became part of the canonical screenplay, a practice known as retroscripting.
Much of the show's content, particularly dialogue between Dr. Katz and Ben, is improvised through a process called "retroscripting", in which a vague outline is developed but the actual dialogue is ad-libbed. This style, as well as the animation technique Squigglevision, would reappear in "Home Movies", a cartoon on which many members of the Dr. Katz cast and crew worked.
Melissa Bardin Galsky. Poundstone's role was recast after six episodes and given to Janine Ditullio as a replacement. The first five episodes of the season demonstrated a writing style known as "retroscripting," consisting of the cast completely improvising the storyline and animation being produced afterword.
Animated in Squigglevision and heavily using retroscripting, the first five episodes aired on UPN in 1999. The show introduced the main characters in this season, and mainly consisted of episodes revolving around Brendon's movies. Much of the style of the writing is loose and improvised. The season ends with Brendon saying hello to his erstwhile absent father on the phone.
The main cast for the season consisted of Small, Janine Ditullio, H. Jon Benjamin, and Melissa Bardin Galsky. Among the guest stars during the season were Todd Barry and Mitch Hedberg, along with Louis C.K., who portrayed Brendon's father Andrew. A lot of the season featured "retroscripting," with the actors improvising several of their character's dialogue.
Outsiders Inn is an American half-hour reality television show which is a spin-off from "Gone Country", but created through the process known as retroscripting. The series debuted on CMT August 15, 2008, where it ran for eight weeks. The series is executive produced by Jay Renfroe and David Garfinkle of Renegade 83 Productions and Sandy Chanley of Productions Partners Inc.
"The Art of the Sucker Punch" was written using "retroscripting," where each cast member completely improvised their lines, though certain script material was provided by co-creator and episode director Loren Bouchard. The episode was based on an experience co-creator and lead voice actor Brendon Small had at his school in his childhood with a bully. Comedian Emo Philips guest starred in the episode as Shannon.
"The Art of the Sucker Punch" was inspired by a confrontation series co-creator Brendon Small had with a school bully when he was a child. The episode, as with the other first four episodes of the series, demonstrated a writing style known as "retroscripting," in which the cast completely improvised their lines. In order to convincingly make the child characters sound like actual children despite being portrayed by adults, recordings of the actors' performance in the episode were electronically altered.
"Get Away From My Mom" was the first episode of "Home Movies," which was created by Brendon Small and Loren Bouchard. The episode, as with the four subsequent episodes, demonstrated a writing style known as "retroscripting," in which the cast completely improvised their lines. Main cast members Small, H. Jon Benjamin, Paula Poundstone and Melissa Bardin Galsky wrote the episodes, while Bouchard also contributed to certain dialogue material. The episode marked the first animated television production without a script.
Hines began her acting career by doing improvisational comedy at The Groundlings Theater. Among the people she studied with was Lisa Kudrow. She also learned to write comedy sketches, which served her well when working on HBO's "Curb Your Enthusiasm" as Larry David's fictional wife, Cheryl. The show is written using the retroscripting technique, in which the plot outlines are generally and loosely drawn, and the individual actors improvise to create the dialogue.
The series, like "Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist", the first season of "Home Movies", and "Science Court", was animated in Squigglevision, a computer animation technique that caused the edges of people and important objects to vibrate constantly. Also like those series, Dick and Paula utilized retroscripting for much of the dialog, in that a basic outline is given and the actors improvise the dialog. Later, the dialog is edited to a coherent script.
The plots and subplots of the episodes are established in an outline written by David, and the dialogue is largely improvised by the actors (a technique known as retroscripting). As with "Seinfeld", which David co-created, the subject matter in "Curb Your Enthusiasm" often involves the minutiae of American daily social life, and plots often revolve around Larry David's many faux pas and his problems with certain social conventions and expectations, as well as his annoyance with other people's behavior. The character has a hard time letting such annoyances go unexpressed, which often leads him into awkward situations.
Only the basic plot elements of the show are scripted, while the dialogue is improvised—enhancing the illusion of reality (a practice referred to as retroscripting). Unlike "Cops," which the show parodies, "Reno 911!" Sheriff's deputies are constantly cursing, causing much of their dialogue to be censored for broadcast. The actors often perform their own stunts. A constantly changing cast of weirdos, prostitutes, homeless persons, survivalists, political figures, celebrities, etc. are portrayed by comedian friends of the primary cast, and the cast themselves, while disguising their voices and general appearance (and, whose faces were blurred in the style of "Cops").
The episode used retroscripting, a process by which the actors completely improvised all their dialogue lines, the first time this technique was used for an animated television production. Certain script material, however, was provided by series co-founder Loren Bouchard, who also directed the episode. The pilot also utilized the "Squigglevision" style of animation which was used to produce the show for the entirety of its first season. In its original broadcast, "Get Away From My Mom" received a 1.4/2 Nielsen Rating, the lowest UPN had ever received in that time slot. The episode received mixed reviews from television critics, particularly pertaining to its employment of improvisation.
Improvised sitcoms are a recent television phenomenon in which there is no definite script for the actors and actresses. Rather, the actors/actresses use the process of retroscripting in which there are rough outlines of themes and stories, but the dialogue is up for the actors/actresses to improvise. Because of the improvised fashion, these sitcoms are usually shot by handheld camera in a documentary-type style. Usually these shows have no laugh tracks, predetermined entrances, or punchlines. Such improvised sitcoms include "Curb Your Enthusiasm", "Home Movies" and "Reno 911!". In addition to these, there are many scripted shows that will, after getting principal photography, let the actors do a couple of improv takes, and often some of the best jokes that make it on the show will come from these takes. Notable examples of this would be the US version "The Office" or "Parks and Recreation" and the British show The Thick of it
Attempting to focus on believability rather than action and gore, Peli chose to shoot the picture with a home video camera. In deciding on a more raw and stationary format (the camera was almost always sitting on a tripod or something else) and eliminating the need for a camera crew, a "higher degree of plausibility" was created for the audience as they were "more invested in the story and the characters". Peli says that the dialogue was "natural" because there was no real script. Instead, the actors were given outlines of the story and situations to improvise, a technique known as "retroscripting" also used in the making of "The Blair Witch Project". In casting the movie, Peli auditioned "a few hundred people" before finally meeting Katie Featherston and Micah Sloat. He originally auditioned them individually and later called them back to audition together. Peli was impressed with the chemistry between the actors, saying, "If you saw the [audition] footage, you would've thought they had known each other for years." During a guest appearance on "The Jay Leno Show" on November 3, 2009, Sloat and Featherston explained they each saw the casting call on LACasting. Featherston noted they were originally paid $500 for their work.
Attempting to focus on believability rather than action and gore, Peli chose to shoot the picture with a home video camera. In deciding on a more raw and stationary format (the camera was almost always sitting on a tripod or something else) and eliminating the need for a camera crew, a "higher degree of plausibility" was created for the audience as they were "more invested in the story and the characters". Peli says that the dialogue was "natural" because there was no real script. Instead, the actors were given outlines of the story and situations to improvise, a technique known as "retroscripting" used in the making of "The Blair Witch Project". In casting the movie, Peli auditioned "a few hundred people" before finally meeting Katie Featherston and Micah Sloat. He originally auditioned them individually and later called them back to audition together. Peli was impressed with the chemistry between the actors, saying, "If you saw the footage, you would've thought they had known each other for years." During a guest appearance on "The Jay Leno Show" on November 3, 2009, Sloat and Featherston explained they each saw the casting call on LACasting. Featherston noted they were originally paid $500 for their work.