Synonyms for safita or Related words with safita

murqub              jableh              salkhad              tartous              hasbaya              qatana              sharqia              hamah              qalaat              dakahlia              akkar              batroun              gharbia              rankous              nabatieh              beheira              mahallat              mafraq              jdeideh              gharb              hafar              nabeul              ajloun              shaqlawa              nabatiyeh              jerada              kebili              chefchaouen              ajlun              hafir              majdel              harir              zuwara              qaqun              butnan              saidnaya              akouda              qaryat              jijel              misratah              zgharta              kerak              borazjan              hadath              rashaya              baabda              qudsaya              jaghbub              dahuk              tafilah             



Examples of "safita"
Safita District () is a district of the Tartus Governorate in northwestern Syria. Administrative centre is the city of Safita. At the 2004 census, the district had a population of 129,632.
The district of Safita is divided into six sub-districts or nawāḥī (population as of 2004):
Safita ( ""; , "Safita") is a city in the Tartous Governorate, northwestern Syria, located to the southeast of Tartous and to the northwest of Krak des Chevaliers. It is situated on the tops of three hills and the valleys between them, in the Syrian Coastal Mountain Range.
Al Karama, or simply Karama (, literally meaning "dignity"), is a village in administrative division (nahiyah) of Safita in the Tartus Governorate of Syria.
Basile Khoury, BS (15 August 1900, Borj-Safita, today Syria – 22 April 1985) was the first Archeparch of the Melkite Greek Catholic Archeparchy of Sidon in Lebanon.
Kamal Abu-Deeb in arabic (كمال أبو ديب ) (born 1942 in Safita, Syria) is Chair of Arabic at the University of London. He was a Leverhulme Trust Fellow.
Mhardeh, Al-Suqaylabiyah, Kafr Buhum, Safita, Wadi al-Nasara, Al-Kafrun, Mashta al-Helu, Maten al-Sahel, Marmarita, Hawash, Rabah, Syria, Kafr Ram, Deir Mama, Al-Bayda, Syria, Ma'loula, Saidnaya, Al-Suwayda, Salkhad, Zweitina, Ayn al-Barda, Muklous
Latakia Province had eight constituencies and was allocated 20 seats: Latakia City (3 seats, 1 reserved for non-Muslims), Latakia (2 seats), Al-Haffah (2 seats), Jableh (1 seat), Nabi Ali (3 seats), Banias (2 seats), Tartus (3 seats) and Safita (4 seats, 1 reserved for non-Muslims).
Bayt al-Shaykh Yunis (, also spelled "Beit al-Sheikh Yunes") is a village in northwestern Syria, administratively part of the Tartus Governorate. It is located between Safita (to the east) and Ras al-Khashufah (to the west). According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Bayt al-Shaykh Yunis had a population of 2,199 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Alawites.
Buwaydat al-Suwayqat (, also spelled "Bweidat al-Sweiqat") is a village in northwestern Syria, administratively part of the Tartus Governorate. It is located between Safita (to the east) and Ras al-Khashufah (to the west). According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Buwaydat al-Suwayqat had a population of 2,835 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Alawites.
Al-'Akkari () is a town in northwestern Syria administratively belonging to the Homs Governorate just north of the border with Lebanon and west of Homs. Nearby towns include Talkalakh to the east, Marmarita to the northeast and Safita to the north. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) al-Akkari had a population of 2,127 in 2004.
He was master of the Province of Apulia and Sicily from 1205 to 1232. In 1232, he was elected Grand Master of the Templars. He organized attacks on Cana, Safita, Sephoria and Praetoria, and against the Muslim positions around the Sea of Galilee. All of these expeditions were failures and diminished the Templars' effectiveness.
Bahuzi (, also spelled "Bhozy") is a village in northwestern Syria, administratively part of the Tartus Governorate. It is located between Safita (to the east) and Ras al-Khashufah (to the west). According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Bahuzi had a population of 1,801 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Alawites.
Tell Kazel is an oval-shaped tell that measures by at its base, narrowing to by at its top. It is located in the Safita district of the Tartus Governorate in Syria in the north of the Akkar plain on the north of the al-Abrash river approximately south of Tartus.
According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Mashta al-Helu had a population of 2,458 in the 2004 census. It is the administrative center of the Mashta al-Helu "nahiyah" ("sub-district") of the Safita District which contained 19 localities with a collective population of 12,577 in 2004. Its inhabitants are predominantly Christians.
Chastel Blanc (, "Burj Safita" or Safita Tower) was built by the Knights Templar during the Crusades upon prior fortifications. Constructed on the middle hill of Safita's three hills, it offers a commanding view of the surrounding countryside, and was a major part of the network of Crusader fortifications in the area. From the roof, one can see from the Mediterranean Sea to the snow-covered mountains of Lebanon, and Tripoli. From Chastel Blanc it would have been possible to see the Templar strongholds at Tartus and Ruad Island to the northwest, Chastel Rouge on the coastline to the southwest, Akkar to the south, and Krak des Chevaliers (the headquarters of the Syrian Knights Hospitallers) to the southeast. The tower is the remaining keep of the original castle. It has a height of , a width of , and a length of . A large bell is on the western wall, and its sound can be heard up to from Safita. The castle had to be restored in 1170 and 1202 following damages due to earthquakes. The keep in its current shape probably dates from the reconstruction after 1202.
Yahmur (; also spelled "Yahmour") is a village in northwestern Syria, administratively part of the Tartus Governorate. It is located along the road between Safita in the east and Tartus to the west. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Yahmur had a population of 3,722 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Alawites. Nearby is Chastel Rouge (Qal'at Yahmur), a Crusader-era castle.
Between 1809 and 1813, Barbar, who hated the Alawites, attacked the Kalbiyya tribe from among them with "marked savagery." His principal enemy was the semi-autonomous Alawite sheikh of Safita, Saqr al-Mahfuz. In 1816, Barbar built the fortress of Iaal. That same year, soldiers serving him ravaged a number of Ismaili Shia villages in the Nusayriyya Mountains, which proved disastrous for the Ismailis. This included the final destruction of the Al-Kahf Castle.
In September 2015, it was estimated that approximately 800 Russian marines had taken up positions all along western Syria with the majority of them being stationed in the mountainous city of Slunfeh in east Latakia – the remaining marines had been moved to the Homs (Wadi Al-Nasara) and Tartous (Masyaf and Safita) Governorates in preparation for the Russian military intervention in the Syrian Civil War.
Sebei (, also spelled Sebbeh) is a small town in northwestern Syria, located northeast of Safita in the Tartus Governorate. It is situated atop two hills and the valley between them, in the An-Nusayriyah Mountains, the Syrian coastal mountain range. Nearby localities Mashta al-Helu and al-Kafrun to the south, Duraykish to the west, Wadi al-Oyun to the northwest and Ayn al-Shams to the northeast.