Synonyms for schizophrenics or Related words with schizophrenics

schizophrenic              depressives              migraineurs              nondemented              suicidality              narcoleptic              hypoactivity              ptsd              impulsivity              amci              llmd              psychopathology              aphasic              anhedonic              parkinsonian              catatonia              pocd              epileptics              mtbi              pharmacoresistant              aphasias              neurocognitive              neurologically              neurobehavioral              unmedicated              cognitively              adhd              tmjd              nonconvulsive              hyperarousal              demented              dyslexic              dysthymia              psychiatrically              nondepressed              ymrs              posthypoxic              schizophrenia              somatization              subsyndromal              hypomania              neurasthenia              stereotypies              apbd              ftld              amnesias              neurotypical              symptomatologies              mdd              insomniacs             



Examples of "schizophrenics"
In 1952 Redlich co-edited with Eugene Brody the widely read book, "Psychotherapy With Schizophrenics."
1964 "Symptomatology in Japanese and American Schizophrenics," "Ethnology," 3:2, 172-178
Like many schizophrenics, Peterson heard voices and he reported the voices as being "friendly".
In schizophrenics, post-mortem analysis has indicated a decrease of GABAergic cells and activity in the hippocampus.
Before Mary Barnes was a well-known artist, she was a patient at Kingsley Hall, a therapeutic community for schizophrenics.
Schizophrenics Anonymous is a self-help group to help people who are affected by schizophrenia to cope with the disorder.
In 1964, Caudill continued his study of psychiatric hospitals but with a comparative research approach. In "Symptomatology in Japanese and American Schizophrenics," Caudill compared symptom patterns of hospitalized schizophrenics in both Japanese and American psychiatric hospitals based on research at Matsuzawa Hospital in Tokyo and Spring Grove State Hospital in Cantonsville, Maryland.
It is argued that such a view would be consistent with the model that suggests schizophrenics and high schizotypes are people with a tendency to hyper-arousal.
Schizophrenics are often portrayed as dangerous, violent, and as criminals despite the fact that the large majority of them are not.
It has been shown that a certain protein is lost in schizophrenics that causes dendrites and spines to deteriorate in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, a part of the neocortex, which plays a key role in information processing, attention, memory, orderly thinking and planning which are all functions that deteriorate in schizophrenics. The deterioration of the neuropil in this cortex has been proposed as the cause of schizophrenia.
Technical support for Schizophrenics Anonymous had been provided by the National Schizophrenia Foundation (NSF) until 2007 when NSF ceased doing business. In response to the loss of a national organization supporting people with schizophrenia and related disorders and Schizophrenics Anonymous, a group of consumers, family members, and mental health providers came together to form a national 501(3)c not-for-profit organization, Schizophrenia and Related Disorders Alliance of America (SARDAA).
In humans, schizophrenia may be caused by deterioration of neuropil, with much evidence specifically pointing to dysfunction in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Research has shown reduced neuropil in area 9 of schizophrenics, as well as consistent findings of reduced spine density in layer III pyramidal neurons of the temporal and frontal cortices. Since neuropil is the location of most cortical synapses it is likely that the deterioration greatly affects processing and produces the symptoms schizophrenics exhibit.
According to Doctor of Legal Sciences Vladimir Ovchinsky, regional differences in forensic psychiatric expert reports are striking. For example, in some regions of Russia, 8 or 9 percent of all examinees are pronounced sane; in other regions up to 75 percent of all examinees are pronounced sane. In some regions less than 2 percent of examinees are declared schizophrenics; in other regions up to 80 percent of examinees are declared schizophrenics.
According to Doctor of Legal Sciences Vladimir Ovchinsky, regional differences in forensic psychiatric expert reports are striking. For example, in some regions of Russia, 8 or 9 percent of all examinees are pronounced sane; in other regions up to 75 percent of all examinees are pronounced sane. In some regions less than 2 percent of examinees are declared schizophrenics; in other regions up to 80 percent of examinees are declared schizophrenics.
As the brain develops, connectivity of different regions changes dramatically. Researchers found that there is a discrepancy in the way white matter and grey matter develop in schizophrenic patients. Schizophrenics tend to have an absence of white matter expansion.
In January 2015, Muswell Hill Press published her new book, written under the pseudonym Q.S Lam, "Schizophrenics Can Be Good Mothers Too". In June 2015, the book was launched in London at Shoreditch House and Rich Mix.
In schizophrenics, it has been shown that "reelin" is down-regulated through increased DNA methylation at promoter regions in GABAergic interneurons. DNMT1 has also been shown to be upregulated in these cells.
When various statistical correlations were computed, schizophrenic patients were fundamentally related although not entirely paralleled with patients with frontal lobe dysfunction. In contrast to the general impairment imposed for schizophrenics, focal lesions assumed specific deficits.
Scheper-Hughes' first book, "Saints, Scholars and Schizophrenics: Mental Illness in Rural Ireland" (1979), a study of madness among bachelor farmers, won the Margaret Mead Award from the Society for Applied Anthropology in 1980.
MRI studies have shown that the planum temporale in schizophrenics is more symmetrical. This reduced lateralization correlates with more severe positive symptoms, such as hallucinations, as measured by the PANSS.