Synonyms for snake_heterodon or Related words with snake_heterodon

hog_nosed              platirhinos              diadophis_punctatus              eastern_hognose              pseudonaja_textilis              masticophis              baird_girard              sistrurus_catenatus              catenatus              copperhead_agkistrodon_contortrix              nasicus              heterodon_platirhinos              crotalus_horridus              massasauga_sistrurus              storeria              ringneck_snake              platyrhinos              striped_whipsnake              six_lined_racerunner              gloydi              hognose_snake              pantherophis_obsoletus              pseudechis_porphyriacus              couperi              klauberi              clethrionomys              duméril_bibron_duméril              scaphiopus              racer_coluber_constrictor              worm_snake              subflavus              indigo_snake_drymarchon              heterodon              bottae              umbrinus              desert_horned_lizard              obesulus              timber_rattlesnake_crotalus_horridus              lampropeltis_triangulum              pantherophis              bassaricyon              hoary_bat_lasiurus_cinereus              cnemidophorus_sexlineatus              simoselaps_australis              agkistrodon_contortrix              macrourus              gapperi              hybognathus              myodes_gapperi              redbelly_snake             



Examples of "snake_heterodon"
The western hognose snake ("Heterodon nasicus") is a species of non-venomous colubrid endemic to North America.
Also, he is honored by having named after him the following taxa: a genus of Asian pit vipers, "Gloydius"; two species of nonvenomous snakes, the eastern fox snake, "Pantherophis gloydi", and the dusty hognose snake, "Heterodon nasicus gloydi"; and two subspecies of Central American pit vipers, "Agkistrodon bilineatus howardgloydi" and "Crotalus intermedius gloydi".
Although some local declines have been reported, the species is widespread, has a large overall population size (>100,000), and is effectively protected by a variety of conservation programs. It is therefore currently classified as Least Concern by the IUCN. The eastern hognose snake ("Heterodon platirhinos") is classified as a threatened species in some regions of its range and is therefore protected under those state's laws.
In the Middle Coosa River Watershed, 281 occurrences of rare plant and animal species and natural communities have been documented, including 73 occurrences of 23 species that are federal or state protected. Ten conservation targets were chosen: the riverine system, matrix forest communities (oak hickory-pine forest), gray bat ("Myotis grisescens"), riparian vegetation, mountain longleaf pine ("Pinus palustris") forest communities, red-cockaded woodpecker ("Picoides borealis"), critically imperiled aquatic species (fish, mussels, and snails), southern hognose snake ("Heterodon simus"), caddisflies, and imperiled plants. Maintaining the biodiversity of the Coosa River system is particularly important because it has already lost a significant portion of its aquatic fauna to extinction.
Connecticut is home to 14 species of snakes and only two are venomous. The Black racer ("Coluber c. constrictor"), Dekay's brownsnake ("Storeria d. dekayi"), Eastern ratsnake ("Pantherophis obsoletus"), Garternake ("Thamnophis s. sirtalis"), Hog-nosed snake ("Heterodon platirhinos"), milk snake ("Lampropeltis t. triangulum"), northern watersnake ("Nerodia sipedon sipedon"), redbelly snake ("Storeria o. occipitomaculata"), ribbonsnake ("Thamnophis sauritus"), ring-necked snake ("Diadophis punctatus edwardsii"), smooth greensnake ("Liochlorophis vernalis") and worm snake ("Carphophis a. amoenus)") are non-venomous. The Copperhead ("Agkistrodon contortrix mokasen") and Timber rattlesnake ("Crotalus horridus") are venomous. In the state of the Connecticut, the Timber rattlesnake is listed as endangered and Eastern ratsnake is regulated with both the Ribbonsnake and Hog-nosed snake as of special concern.
With its combination of grassland, riparian habitat, coulees and badlands, the Milk River Natural Area and Kennedy Coulee Ecological Reserve host a variety of amphibians and reptiles, including rare northern leopard frogs ("Rana pipiens"), listed as threatened in Alberta and both a Canadian species at risk (SARA) and Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) species of special concern, as well as prairie rattlesnake ("Crotalus viridis"), bullsnake ("Pituophis catenifer sayi"), western hognose snake ("Heterodon nasicus"), western painted turtle ("Chrysemys picta"), garter snake ("Thamnophis radix"), and the nationally and provincially endangered short-horned lizard ("Phrynosoma douglassi"), which is at the northern limit of its geographical range here. The northern leopard frog and prairie rattlesnake in particular are indicator species of the ecological health of the Milk River watershed.
The Western Hog-nosed Snake ("Heterodon nasicus") is a harmless colubrid species found in North America and northern Mexico. The Western Hognose Snake is a light sandy brown in color, with darker brown or gray blotching, their coloration is not nearly as variable as the Eastern Hognose, "Heterodon platirhinos", but they often have an ink-black and white or yellow checker patterned belly, sometimes accented with orange. They are very stout for their size (a full grown 24-inch female is as bulky as a five-foot corn snake) and can grow from 15 to 33 inches in length, with females generally being larger than males. The characteristic of all hognose snakes is their upturned snout, which aids in digging in the soil. Hognose Snakes are considered to be rear-fanged venomous, but are not considered to pose any danger to humans and will only bite as a feeding response, rarely in defense.
With the addition of a Yellow Anaconda, the zoo started gaining popularity and was able to acquire more animals to their collection, but there was a slight twist. Instead of purchasing new animals from breeders Discovery Reptiles decided to rescue and rehabilitate unwanted animals and sick animals. They were able to rescue Sulcata Tortoise "Geochelone sulcata", Jungle Carpet Pythons "Morelia spilota cheynei", Coastal Carpet Pythons "Morelia spilota mcdowelli", a Borneo Blood Python "Python curtus breitensteini", an Argentine Black and White Tegu "Tupinambis merianae", Amazon Tree Boa "Corallus hortulanus", Bull Snakes "Pituophis catenifer sayi", Corn Snakes "Pantherophis guttatus guttatus", Hog Nose Snake "Heterodon nasicus", Hog Island Boa "Boa constrictor imperator" and many more. They also added other animals, including a female Caiman Lizard to go along with their two male, critically endangered Grand Cayman Blue Iguanas "Cyclura lewisi", and two endangered Louisiana Pine Snakes "Pituophis ruthveni".
The Western Hog-nosed Snake ("Heterodon nasicus") is a harmless colubrid species found in North America and northern Mexico. The Western Hognose Snake is a light sandy brown in color, with darker brown or gray blotching, their coloration is not nearly as variable as the Eastern Hognose, "Heterodon platirhinos", but they often have an ink-black and white or yellow checker patterned belly, sometimes accented with orange. They are very stout for their size (a full grown 24-inch female is as bulky as a five-foot corn snake) and can grow from 15 to 33 inches in length, with females generally being larger than males. The characteristic of all hognose snakes is their upturned snout, which aids in digging in the soil. Hognose Snakes are considered to be rear-fanged venomous, but are not considered to pose any danger to humans and will only bite as a feeding response, rarely in defense.