Synonyms for solipsism or Related words with solipsism

subjectivism              externalism              relativism              scientism              fallibilism              panpsychism              perspectivism              essentialism              pantheism              intuitionism              nominalism              fatalism              foundationalism              egoism              dualism              psychologism              holism              presentism              supernaturalism              emergentism              cognitivism              internalism              conventionalism              physicalism              irrationality              nihilism              nominalist              phenomenalism              monism              theodicy              teleology              fideism              materialist              vitalism              materialism              sophistry              theism              irrationalism              omnipotence              logicism              humean              emotivism              existentialism              ontic              dualist              pandeism              eliminativism              atomism              meaninglessness              empiricist             



Examples of "solipsism"
Solipsism is a form of logical minimalism. Many people are intuitively unconvinced of the nonexistence of the external world from the basic arguments of solipsism, but a solid proof of its existence is not available at present. The central assertion of solipsism rests on the nonexistence of such a proof, and strong solipsism (as opposed to weak solipsism) asserts that no such proof can be made. In this sense, solipsism is logically related to agnosticism in religion: the distinction between believing you do not know, and believing you could not have known.
To discuss consequences clearly, an alternative is required: solipsism as opposed to what? Solipsism is opposed to all forms of realism and many forms of idealism (insofar as they claim that there is something outside the idealist's mind, which is itself another mind, or mental in nature). Realism in a minimal sense, that "there is an external universe" is most likely not observationally distinct from solipsism. The objections to solipsism therefore have a theoretical rather than an empirical thrust.
Denial of materialistic existence, in itself, does not constitute solipsism.
Individuals experiencing solipsism syndrome feel that the world is not 'real' in the sense of being external to their own minds. The syndrome is characterized by feelings of loneliness, detachment and indifference to the outside world. Solipsism syndrome is not currently recognized as a psychiatric disorder by the American Psychiatric Association, though it shares similarities with depersonalization disorder, which is recognized. Solipsism syndrome is distinct from solipsism, which is not a psychological state but rather a philosophical position, namely that nothing exists or can be known to exist outside of one's own mind; advocates of this philosophy do not necessarily suffer from solipsism syndrome, and sufferers do not necessarily subscribe to solipsism as a school of intellectual thought.
Solipsism syndrome is a dissociative mental state. It is only incidentally related to philosophical solipsism. The lack of ability to prove the existence of other minds does not, in itself, cause the psychiatric condition of detachment from reality.
The concept of the Self in the philosophy of Advaita, could be interpreted as solipsism. However, the transhuman, theological implications of the Self in Advaita protect it from true solipsism as is found in the west. Similarly, the Vedantic text Yogavasistha, escapes charge of solipsism because the real "I" is thought to be nothing but the absolute whole looked at through a particular unique point of interest.
Solipsism is the philosophical idea that only one's own mind is sure to exist. The term comes from Latin "solus" (alone) and "ipse" (self). Solipsism as an epistemological position holds that knowledge of anything outside one's own mind is unsure. The external world and other minds cannot be known, and might not exist outside the mind. As a metaphysical position, solipsism goes further to the conclusion that the world and other minds do not exist. As such it is the only epistemological position that, by its own postulate, is both irrefutable and yet indefensible in the same manner. Although the number of individuals sincerely espousing solipsism has been small, it is not uncommon for one philosopher to accuse another's arguments of entailing solipsism as an unwanted consequence, in a kind of reductio ad absurdum. In the history of philosophy, solipsism has served as a skeptical hypothesis.
Solipsism (; ) is the philosophical idea that only one's own mind is sure to exist. As an epistemological position, solipsism holds that knowledge of anything outside one's own mind is unsure; the external world and other minds cannot be known and might not exist outside the mind. As a metaphysical position, solipsism goes further to the conclusion that the world and other minds do not exist.
Schubert-Soldern held teaching posts at Leipzig and Görz. He defended a philosophy of epistemological solipsism.
In teachings of Ramana Maharshi there are two cues on solipsism:
There are varying degrees of solipsism that parallel the varying degrees of skepticism:
Metaphysical solipsism is a variety of solipsism. Based on a philosophy of subjective idealism, metaphysical solipsists maintain that the self is the only existing reality and that all other realities, including the external world and other persons, are representations of that self, and have no independent existence. There are weaker versions of metaphysical solipsism, such as Caspar Hare's egocentric presentism (or perspectival realism), in which other people are conscious but their experiences are simply not "present".
In epistemology and the philosophy of mind, methodological solipsism has at least two distinct definitions:
Friedan's chapter on "The Sexual Solipsism of Sigmund Freud" was inspired by Simone de Beauvoir's "The Second Sex".
On the face of it, a "statement" of solipsism is — at least performatively — self-defeating, because a statement assumes another person to whom the statement is made. (That is to say, an unexpressed private belief in solipsism is not self-refuting). This, of course, assumes the solipsist would not communicate with a hallucination, even if just for self-amusement.
There are weaker versions of metaphysical solipsism, such as Caspar Hare's egocentric presentism (or perspectival realism), in which other persons are conscious but their experiences are simply not "present". Similarly, J. J. Valberg develops a concept of one's personal horizon and discusses how it is in a sense "the" (preeminent) horizon, stating that "we are all solipsists" in his sense of solipsism.
Methodological solipsism is an agnostic variant of solipsism. It exists in opposition to the strict epistemological requirements for "Knowledge" ("e.g." the requirement that knowledge must be certain). It still entertains the points that any induction is fallible and that we may be brains in vats. Methodological solipsism sometimes goes even further to say that even what we perceive as the brain is actually part of the external world, for it is only through our senses that we can see or feel the mind. Only the existence of thoughts is known for certain.
Solipsism was first recorded by the Greek presocratic sophist, Gorgias (c. 483–375 BC) who is quoted by the Roman skeptic Sextus Empiricus as having stated:
Egocentric presentism is a weak form of solipsism introduced by Caspar Hare in which other persons can be conscious, but their experiences are simply not "present".
Rae Helen Langton, in "Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification", proposed three more properties to be added to Nussbaum's list: