Synonyms for starorussky_uyezd or Related words with starorussky_uyezd

borovichsky_uyezd              tikhvinsky_uyezd              novgorodsky_uyezd              ustyuzhensky_uyezd              luga_okrug              kargopolsky_uyezd              pskov_okrug              leningrad_okrug              kadnikovsky_uyezd              velikoluksky              kashinsky              velikiye_luki_okrug              porkhovsky_uyezd              novgorod_governorate              novorzhevsky              vologda_governorate              zubtsovsky              kirillovsky_uyezd              bezhetsky              belgorod_governorate              vesyegonsky              olonets_governorate              vologda_viceroyalty              sebezhsky              vesyegonsky_uyezd              detskoselsky              nevelsky              mezensky_uyezd              lodeynopolsky_uyezd              petergofsky              kingiseppsky              novgorod_viceroyalty              pskov_governorate              solvychegodsky              mogilev_governorate              dvinsky              maryovo              vyshnevolotsky              vologodsky              toropetsky              ostashkovsky              kimrsky              uyezd              arkhangelsk_governorate              opochetsky              pskovsky              borovichi_okrug              vologda_okrug              novgorod_okrug              velikoustyugsky             



Examples of "starorussky_uyezd"
The "selo" of Poddorye was first mentioned in 1809. At that time, it was a part of Starorussky Uyezd of Novgorod Governorate. In 1824, Poddorskaya Volost was transformed into a military settlement and subordinated to the Defense Ministry. Later in the 19th century, it was transferred back to Starorussky Uyezd.
In 1816, Novgorod Governorate became the area where military settlements were deployed, in accordance with the project designed by Aleksey Arakcheyev, an influential statesman. It was inconvenient to have both civial and military administration in Staraya Russa, and therefore Starorussky Uyezd was abolished in 1824. The town of Staraya Russa and some adjacent territories were directly subordinated to the Defense Ministry. Simultaneously, Demyansk was chartered, and Demyansky Uyezd was established. Military settlements were established in Novgorodsky, Demyansky, and Krestetsky Uyezds. The military settlements were proven inefficient, in particular, in 1831, the area participated in the Cholera Riots. They were abolished in 1856. In 1857, Starorussky Uyezd was re-established.
Also effective October 1, 1927, Volotovsky District with the administrative center in the settlement of Volot was established, as a part of Novgorod Okrug of Leningrad Oblast. It included parts of Starorussky Uyezd. On January 1, 1932, Volotovsky District was abolished and split between Soletsky, Starorussky, Dnovsky, and Dedovichsky Districts. On February 15, 1935, the district was re-established.
Effective October 1, 1927, Volotovsky District with the administrative center in the settlement of Volot was also established as a part of Novgorod Okrug of Leningrad Oblast. It included parts of former Starorussky Uyezd. On January 1, 1932, Volotovsky District was abolished and split between Soletsky, Starorussky, Dnovsky, and Dedovichsky Districts. On February 15, 1935, the district was re-established.
Effective October 1, 1927, Podgoshchsky District with the administrative center in the "selo" of Podgoshchi was also established, as a part of Novgorod Okrug of Leningrad Oblast. It included parts of Starorussky Uyezd. On September 20, 1931, Podgoshchsky District was abolished and merged into Starorussky District.
Maryovo was mentioned in a chronicle in 1495 as Maryova. At the time, it was a part of Derevskaya Pyatina of the Novgorod Republic. Between 1612 and 1617, during the Ingrian War, it was occupied by Polish and Swedish troops. By 1620, it was completely depopulated and had to be repopulated again. In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. Until and 1824, Maryovo was a part of Starorussky Uyezd of Novgorod Viceroyalty (since 1796 of Novgorod Governorate). In 1824, it was transferred to Demyansky Uyezd, which was split off Starorussky Uyezd.
Maryovo (Maryova) was mentioned in a chronicle in 1495. The area was a part of Derevskaya Pyatina of the Novgorod Republic. Between 1612 and 1617, during the Ingrian War, it was occupied by Polish and Swedish troops. By 1620, the area became completely depopulated and had to be repopulated again. In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. Until 1824, Maryovo was a part of Starorussky Uyezd of Novgorod Viceroyalty (since 1796 of Novgorod Governorate). In 1824, the area was transferred to Demyansky Uyezd, which was split from Starorussky Uyezd.
The area of the district in the 15th century was a part of Shelonskaya "Pyatina" of the Novgorod lands. Some of the villages, including the village of Peregino, have been known since the 15th century. The "selo" of Poddorye was first mentioned in 1809. In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. Pereginskaya and Poddorskaya Volosts were a part of Starorussky Uyezd of Novgorod Viceroyalty (since 1796 of Novgorod Governorate). In 1824, Poddorskaya Volost was transformed into a military settlement and subordinated to the Defense Ministry. Later in the 19th century, it was transferred back to Starorussky Uyezd.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1776, Staraya Russa became the administrative center of Starorussky Uyezd of Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was transformed into Novgorod Governorate. In the 1820s, military settlements were organized in Staraya Russa and around, in accordance with the project designed by Aleksey Arakcheyev, an influential statesman. As it was inconvenient to have both civil and military administration in Staraya Russa, the uyezd was subsequently abolished in 1824. The town of Staraya Russa and some adjacent territories were directly subordinated to the Defense Ministry. The military settlements were proven inefficient, in particular, in 1831, the area participated in the Cholera Riots. They were abolished in 1856. In 1857, Starorussky Uyezd was re-established.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, Staraya Russa was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as St. Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1776, Staraya Russa became the seat of Starorussky Uyezd of Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was transformed into Novgorod Governorate. In the 1820s, military settlements were organized in Staraya Russa and around, in accordance with the project designed by Aleksey Arakcheyev, an influential statesman. It was inconvenient to have both civil and military administration in Staraya Russa, and therefore the uyezd was abolished in 1824. The town of Staraya Russa and some adjacent territories were directly subordinated to the Defense Ministry. The military settlements were proven inefficient, in particular, in 1831, the area participated in the Cholera Riots. They were abolished in 1856. In 1857, Starorussky Uyezd was re-established.
Effective October 1, 1927, Zaluchsky District with the administrative center in the "selo" of Zaluchye was established as well, as a part of Novgorod Okrug of Leningrad Oblast. It included parts of Starorussky Uyezd. Between August 1941 and February 1943, Zaluchsky District was occupied by German troops. On July 5, 1944, Zaluchsky District was transferred to newly established Novgorod Oblast. On July 22, 1961, Zaluchsky District was abolished and split between Starorussky and Molvotitsky Districts.
Another district established effective October 1, 1927 as a part of Novgorod Okrug of Leningrad Oblast was Zaluchsky District, with the administrative center in the "selo" of Zaluchye. It included parts of Starorussky Uyezd. Between August 1941 and February 1943, Zaluchsky District was occupied by German troops. On July 5, 1944, Zaluchsky District was transferred to newly established Novgorod Oblast. On July 22, 1961, Zaluchsky District was abolished and split between Starorussky and Molvotitsky Districts.
In the 19th century, the area was a part of Starorussky Uyezd of Novgorod Governorate. In August 1927, the governorates and uyezds were abolished. Volotovsky District, with the administrative center in the railway station of Volot, was established within Novgorod Okrug of Leningrad Oblast effective October 1, 1927. It included parts of former Starorussky Uyezd. On July 23, 1930, the okrugs were abolished, and the districts were directly subordinated to the oblast. On January 1, 1932, Volotovsky District was abolished and split between Dedovichsky, Dnovsky, Soletsky, and Starorussky Districts. On February 15, 1935, it was re-established. Between July 28, 1941 and February 24, 1944, Volotovsky District was occupied by German troops. An extended underground resistance organization was active in the district at the time of occupation. On July 5, 1944, Volotovsky District was transferred to newly established Novgorod Oblast. On February 1, 1963, the district was abolished in the course of the Nikita Khrushchev's administrative reform. On November 3, 1965, Volotovsky District was re-established.
The area was a part of Derevskaya Pyatina of the Novgorod Republic. The fortress of Demon, which protected the waterway from Lake Ilmen upstream the Pola and the Yavon to Lake Seliger, was first mentioned in a 1406 chronicle. The fortress was located close to the boundary between the Novgorod Republic and the Grand Duchy of Moscow and it was besieged by Muscovite troops at least twice. The Muscovites did not manage to conquer Demon in 1441, but in the 1470s they were more successful and managed to conquer and destroy the fortress. After the subsequent fall of Novgorod, Demon was transferred to the Grand Duchy of Moscow. In the 17th century, Demon went into decline and a new settlement—known initially as Demyansky Pogost and later as Demyansk—was founded nearby. In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. Between 1772 and 1824, Demyansk was a part of Starorussky Uyezd of Novgorod Viceroyalty (since 1796 of Novgorod Governorate). In 1824, it was chartered and became the seat of Demyansky Uyezd, which was split from Starorussky Uyezd.
Demyansk was first mentioned in a chronicle in 1406 as Demon. The area was a part of Derevskaya Pyatina of Novgorod. Demon was a fortress protecting a waterway from Lake Ilmen upstream the Pola and the Yavon to Lake Seliger. The fortress was located close to the boundary between the Novgorod Republic and the Grand Duchy of Moscow, and it was at least twice sieged by Muscovite troops. In 1441, the Muscovites did not manage to conquer Demon, but in the 1470s they conquered and destroyed the fortress. After the subsequent fall of Novgorod, Demon was transferred to the Grand Duchy of Moscow. In the 17th century, Demon went into decline, and a new settlement was founded nearby, which was known as Demyansky Pogost, and later as Demyansk. In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. Between 1772 and 1824, Demyansk was a part of Starorussky Uyezd of Novgorod Viceroyalty (since 1796 of Novgorod Governorate). In 1824, it was chartered and became the center of Demyansky Uyezd, which was split off Starorussky Uyezd.
In the 19th century, the village Volot was a part of Starorussky Uyezd of Novgorod Governorate. In 1897, a railroad connecting Bologoye and Pskov was opened, and Volot became one of the sixteen railway stations. Later, the settlement at the railway station became the settlement of Volot. On August 1, 1927, the uyezds were abolished, and Volotovsky District was established, with the center in the railway station of Volot. Novgorod Governorate was abolished as well, and the district belonged to Novgorod Okrug of Leningrad Oblast. On July 23, 1930 the okrugs were abolished, and the districts became directly subordinate to the oblast. On January 1, 1932 Volotovsky District was abolished and split between Dedovichsky, Dnovsky, Soletsky, and Starorussky Districts. On February 15, 1935 it was re-established. Between 1941 and 1944 Volot was occupied by German troops. In the district, an extended underground resistance organization was active. On July 5, 1944, Volot and Volotovsky District were transferred to newly established Novgorod Oblast.
Soltsy was first mentioned in a chronicle in 1390 and in the following years played an important role as an intermediate station on the trade route connecting Novgorod and Pskov. In 1471, the army of Ivan III won an important battle over Novgorod on the Shelon River, next to Soltsy. This battle facilitated the submergence of Novgorod by the Grand Duchy of Moscow, and Soltsy eventually fell under its control as well. In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off, and in 1772, Pskov Governorate (Pskov Viceroyalty between 1777 and 1796) was established. In 1776, Porkhovsky Uyezd was transferred from Novgorod Governorate to Pskov Governorate. Soltsy was the seat of Soletskaya Volost of Porkhovsky Uyezd. The area was split between Porkhovsky Uyezd of Pskov Governorate and Starorussky Uyezd of Novgorod Governorate.
In August 1927, the governorates and uyezds were abolished. Poddorsky District, with the administrative center in the "selo" of Poddorye, was established within Novgorod Okrug of Leningrad Oblast effective October 1, 1927. It included parts of former Starorussky Uyezd. On July 23, 1930, the okrugs were abolished, and the districts were directly subordinated to the oblast. On September 20, 1931, Belebyolkovsky District was abolished and merged into Poddorsky District. On March 11, 1941, Belebyolkovsky District was re-established; its new territory included a part of Poddorsky District. In August 1941, Poddorsky District was occupied by German troops. Most of the district was liberated in February 1942, and the remaining part was liberated in February 1944. On July 5, 1944, Poddorsky District was transferred to newly established Novgorod Oblast. On March 31, 1945, the administrative center of the district was transferred to the "selo" of Peregino, but on December 19, 1949 it was transferred back to Poddorye. On July 22, 1961, Belebyolkovsky District was again abolished and merged into Poddorsky District; this time for good. On February 1, 1963, the district was abolished in the course of the Nikita Khrushchev's abortive administrative reform and merged into Kholmsky Rural District. On November 3, 1965, Poddorsky District was re-established.
The village of Parfino was first mentioned in chronicles in 1495. The Lovat River was a part of the Trade route from the Varangians to the Greeks, one of the oldest trading routes passing through Rus. The railway station opened between 1895 and 1897 also got the name of Parfino. In 1910, a construction of a plywood factory started between the village and the station of Parfino. Though formally the factory was built on the lands belonging to the village of Zhereslo, the factory settlement became known as the settlement of Parfino. It belonged to Starorussky Uyezd of Novgorod Governorate, and after 1927, to Starorussky District of Novgorod Okrug of Leningrad Oblast. On July 23, 1930 the okrugs were abolished, and the districts became directly subordinate to the oblast. In 1933, Parfino was granted an urban-type settlement status. The area was occupied by German troops between August 1941 and 1943. On July 5, 1944, Starorussky District was transferred to newly established Novgorod Oblast. On December 13, 1968 Parfinsky District was split off Starorussky District, and Parfino became the district center.
The Lovat River was a part of the trade route from the Varangians to the Greeks, one of the oldest trading routes passing through Rus'. Specifically, the village of Nalyuchi was mentioned in the chronicles in 1200. Many villages were first mentioned in 1495. The area was a part of the Novgorod Republic, and after the fall of Novgorod, it was annexed by the Grand Duchy of Moscow. In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. The current territory of Parfinsky District was a part of Starorussky Uyezd. After the uyezds were abolished in 1927, the territory was split between Starorussky and Polskoy Districts which were a part of Novgorod Okrug of Leningrad Oblast. The administrative center of Polskoy District was in the settlement of Pola. On July 23, 1930, the okrugs were abolished, and the districts were directly subordinated to the oblast. On January 1, 1932, Polskoy District was abolished and merged into Lychkovsky District. On August 3, 1939, the district was re-established under the name of Polavsky District.