Synonyms for subitum or Related words with subitum

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Examples of "subitum"
There is no specific vaccine against or treatment for exanthema subitum, and most children with the disease are not seriously ill.
For HHV-6 infection, no pharmacological treatments have been approved as of June 2012. Although they may be unnecessary for exanthema subitum, the use of "cytomegalovirus" treatments (valganciclovir, ganciclovir, cidofovir, and foscarnet) have shown some success.
HHV-6B primary infection is the cause of the common childhood illness exanthema subitum (also known as roseola infantum or sixth disease). Additionally, HHV-6B reactivation is common in transplant recipients, which can cause several clinical manifestations such as encephalitis, bone marrow suppression, and pneumonitis.
Roseolovirus is a genus of viruses in the order "Herpesvirales", in the family "Herpesviridae", in the subfamily "Betaherpesvirinae". Humans serve as natural hosts. There are currently three species in this genus including the type species "Human herpesvirus 6A". Diseases associated with this genus include: HHV-6: sixth disease (roseola infantum, exanthem subitum); HHV-7: symptoms analog to the 'sixth disease'.
Betaherpesvirinae is a subfamily of viruses in the order Herpesvirales, in the family Herpesviridae. Mammals serve as natural hosts. There are currently 18 species in this subfamily, divided among 4 genera. Diseases associated with this subfamily include: HHV-5: congenital CMV infection. HHV-6: 'sixth disease' (roseola infantum, exanthem subitum). HHV-7: symptoms analog to the 'sixth disease'.
It is caused by two human herpesviruses, "human herpesvirus 6" (HHV-6) and "human herpesvirus 7" (HHV-7), which are sometimes referred to collectively as Roseolovirus. There are two variants of HHV-6 (HHV-6a and HHV-6b) and studies in the US, Europe, Dubai and Japan have shown that exanthema subitum is caused by HHV-6b. This form of HHV-6 infects over 90% of infants by age 2.
Both HHV-6B and HHV-7, as well as other viruses, can cause a skin condition in infants known as exanthema subitum, although HHV-7 causes the disease less frequently than HHV-6B. HHV-7 infection also leads to or is associated with a number of other symptoms, including acute febrile respiratory disease, fever, rash, vomiting, diarrhea, low lymphocyte counts, and febrile seizures, though most often no symptoms present at all.
It is caused by two human herpesviruses, "human herpesvirus 6" (HHV-6) and "human herpesvirus 7" (HHV-7), which are sometimes referred to collectively as Roseolovirus. There are two variants of HHV-6 (HHV-6a and HHV-6b) and studies in the US, Europe, Dubai and Japan have shown that exanthema subitum is caused by HHV-6b. Research has shown that babies can be congenitally infected with HHV-6 via vertical transmission.
Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a set of two closely related herpes viruses known as HHV-6A and HHV-6B that infect nearly all human beings, typically before the age of two. The acquisition of HHV-6 in infancy is often symptomatic, resulting in childhood fever, diarrhea, and exanthem subitum rash (commonly known as roseola). Although rare, this initial infection can also cause febrile seizures, encephalitis or intractable seizures.
Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, HHV-5) "seems to have a large impact on immune parameters in later life and may contribute to increased morbidity and eventual mortality." Human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) has been described as more neurovirulent, and as such is more frequently found in patients with neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Both human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) and human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7), as well as other viruses, can cause a skin condition in infants known as exanthema subitum, roseola infantum (rose rash of infants) or the sixth disease.
A small percentage of children acquire HHV-6 with few sign or symptoms of the disease. Exanthema subitum occurs in approximately 30% of children during primary HHV-6 infection. Others may show symptoms significant enough that other more serious infections, such as meningitis or measles should be ruled out. In case of febrile seizures, medical advice can be sought for reassurance. However, febrile seizures are not harmful, do not require treatment, and have no long term negative effects unless they last longer than five minutes.
The classical presentation of primary HHV-6b infection is as exanthema subitum (ES) or "roseola", featuring a high temperature followed by a rash. However, one study (1997) indicated that a rash is not a distinguishing feature of HHV-6 infection, with rates similar to non-HHV-6 infections (10-20% of febrile children in both groups). HHV-6 infections more frequently present with high temperatures (over 40C), at a rate of around two thirds compared to less than half in the non-HHV-6 patients. Similarly significant differences were seen in malaise, irritability, and tympanic membrane inflammation.
Diagnosis for the virus, particularly HHV-6B, is vital for the patient because of the infection’s adverse effects. Symptoms that point to this infection, such as rashes, go unnoticed in patients that receive antibiotics because they can be misinterpreted as a side-effect of the medicine. HHV-6B is known to be associated with the childhood disease roseola infantum, as well as other illnesses caused by the infection. These include hepatitis, febrile convulsions, and encephalitis. Children who suffer from exanthema subitum, caused by an HHV-6B infection, experience fevers lasting 3 to 5 days; rashes on the torso, neck, and face; and sometimes febrile convulsions, however, the symptoms are not always present together. Primary infections in adults are rare since most occurrences are in children. When the infection does occur for the first time in an adult the symptoms can be severe.