Synonyms for subjectivism or Related words with subjectivism

nominalism              intuitionism              solipsism              scientism              expressivism              materialist              panpsychism              foundationalism              fallibilism              psychologism              essentialism              relativism              conventionalism              rationalism              pantheism              nominalist              existentialism              essentialist              egoism              dualism              vitalism              kantian              cognitivism              organicism              relativist              dualist              supernaturalism              nihilism              emergentism              hegelian              empiricism              humean              materialism              irrationalism              theism              compatibilism              holism              presentism              phenomenalism              hegelianism              pragmatism              deism              rationalistic              dogmatism              formalist              fatalism              foundationalist              evolutionism              occasionalism              positivist             



Examples of "subjectivism"
Autotheism can also refer to the belief that one's self is a deity, within the context of subjectivism. This is a fairly extreme version of subjectivism, however.
Ivanov-Razumnik developed his own system of literary analysis, dividing the history of modern Russian literature into several periods marked by ideological paradigms: the "mystical theory of progress" (1820-1830), then the "positive theory of progress" (1840s), "immanent subjectivism" (Hertzen, 1850s), "vulgar immanent subjectivism" (utilitarianism, nihilism, 1860s), "immanent subjectivism" again (Lavrov and Mikhaylovsky, narodniks; 1870s), the revived "positive theory of progress" (Russian Marxism, 1890s), the return of "mystical theory of progress" (1900s) and again return to "immanent subjectivism" (1910s onwards).
Ethical subjectivism is the meta-ethical view which claims that:
Ethical subjectivism is the meta-ethical view which claims that:
Characteristic ideas of the modern project include individualism, liberalism, marxism, mechanism, rationalism, scientism, secularism, and subjectivism.
Subjectivism is a label used to denote the philosophical tenet that "our own mental activity is the only unquestionable fact of our experience." The success of this position is historically attributed to Descartes and his methodic doubt. Subjectivism has historically been condemned by Christian theologians, which oppose to it the objective authority of the church, the Christian dogma, and the revealed truth of the Bible. Christian theologians, and Karl Barth in particular, have also condemned anthropocentrism as a form of subjectivism.
This makes ethical subjectivism a form of cognitivism. Ethical subjectivism stands in opposition to moral realism, which claims that moral propositions refer to objective facts, independent of human opinion; to error theory, which denies that any moral propositions are true in any sense; and to non-cognitivism, which denies that moral sentences express propositions at all.
This makes ethical subjectivism a form of cognitivism. Ethical subjectivism stands in opposition to moral realism, which claims that moral propositions refer to objective facts, independent of human opinion; to error theory, which denies that any moral propositions are true in any sense; and to non-cognitivism, which denies that moral sentences express propositions at all.
Briefly, Khatami is seeking for a model of subjectivity capable of meeting modern requirements, and convening the privileges of modern subjectivism, but has more to say about man and its spiritual nature. Regarding this goal, one may organize his endeavour in three steps; first he tries to reevaluate modern subjectivism and ventures to amend it by interpreting the legionnaires of modernity; second, he tries to construe the classic Persian conception of man as an ontetic absolute subject who can be reformulated in modern terms; third, he tries to show a rhezomatic turn in the depth of modern subjectivism toward a neutral spirituality and divinity.
Warning against the misinterpretation of the term, Ivanov-Razumnik wrote in "The History of Russian Social Thinking": "The Subjectivism is neither a method nor a means to an end, it is a kind of sociological mindset, in fact, not only sociological, but epistemological, psychological and ethical. Subjectivism might be defined as the ethical and sociological individualism." "The immanent subjectivism amounts to a vigorous, active mindset charged with vitality and giving to both an individual and humanity as a whole a new, subjectively-orientated meaning of life," he stated in another work, "Of the Life’s Meaning" (1910).
Abdolkarimi received his PhD from Aligarh Muslim University in 2001 under the supervision of Syed Abdul Sayeed for his thesis on the critique of Kantian subjectivism.
Simon Lumsden is senior lecturer in philosophy at University of New South Wales. He is known for his research on subjectivism, German idealism and poststructuralism.
In this way, though, subjectivism morphs into a related doctrine, panpsychism, the belief that every objective entity (or event) has an inward or subjective aspect.
The nostalgia of harmony, the rejection of subjectivism, and liturgies of everyday life as an expression of moral integrity, are his cross-cutting themes.
Johannes Rehmke (1 February 1848 – 23 December 1930) was a German philosopher and since 1885 professor at Universität Greifswald, later also provost of this university. He offered sharp criticisms of Kant's approach to epistemology. In his article "The Conquest of Subjectivism", Paul Linke pointed out that it was Rehmke who first banned the words, 'subjective,' 'objective,' 'immanent,' and 'transcendent,' from his philosophical vocabulary. He made a courageous break from subjectivism, which was the pervasive philosophical paradigm of the times, and also criticized phenomenalism.
Where Plato distinguishes between what and how we know things (epistemology), and their ontological status as things (metaphysics), subjectivism such as Berkeley's and a mind dependence of knowledge and reality fails to distinguish between what one knows and what is to be known, or at least explains the distinction superficially. In Platonic terms, a criticism of subjectivism is that it is difficult to distinguish between knowledge, "doxa", and subjective knowledge (true belief), distinctions that Plato makes.
This makes ideal observer theory a subjectivist yet universalist form of cognitivism. Ideal observer theory stands in opposition to other forms of ethical subjectivism (e.g. divine command theory, moral relativism, and individualist ethical subjectivism), as well as to moral realism (which claims that moral propositions refer to objective facts, independent of anyone's attitudes or opinions), error theory (which denies that any moral propositions are true in any sense), and non-cognitivism (which denies that moral sentences express propositions at all).
Ethical subjectivism is compatible with moral absolutism, in that the individual or society to whose attitudes moral propositions refer can hold some moral principle to apply regardless of circumstances. (That is, a moral principle can be relative to an individual, but not relative to circumstances). Ethical subjectivism is also compatible with moral relativism when that is taken to mean the opposite of absolutism, that is, as the claim that moral precepts should be adjusted to circumstances, as in consequentialism.
The success of this position is historically attributed to Descartes and his methodic doubt. Subjectivism accords primacy to subjective experience as fundamental of all measure and law. In extreme forms like Solipsism, it may hold that the nature and existence of every object depends solely on someone's subjective awareness of it. One may consider the qualified empiricism of George Berkeley in this context, given his reliance on God as the prime mover of human perception. Thus, subjectivism.
Expressivism does not hold that the function of moral sentences as used in ordinary discourse is to describe the speaker’s moral attitudes. Expressivists are united in rejecting ethical subjectivism: the descriptivist view that utterances of the type “X is good/bad” mean “I approve/disapprove of X”. Subjectivism is a descriptivist theory, not an expressivist one, because it maintains that moral sentences are used to represent facts–namely, facts about the subject’s psychological states.