Synonyms for sudzha or Related words with sudzha

vuktyl              michurine              urengoy              achinsk              sukhinichi              biysk              loknya              rybinsk              volzhsky              supsa              ukhta              ceyhan              sheksna              vileshchay              yamburg              panva              kuybyshev              melitopol              revda              rozdilna              krasnoslobodsk              nikolsk              druzhba              guryevsky              velikiye              krasnoturyinsk              primorsk              kakhovka              gremyachinsk              petrivske              gryazovets              yaremcha              yuzhnyi              kotorosl              norpipe              pomary              labytnangi              zapolyarny              cegh              zagorye              tavda              prypiat              novokuybyshevsk              telmanove              ktoe              transgaz              lysychansk              zainsk              apsheronsk              davlekanovo             



Examples of "sudzha"
Within the framework of administrative divisions, Sudzha serves as the administrative center of Sudzhansky District. As an administrative division, it is incorporated within Sudzhansky District as the town of district significance of Sudzha. As a municipal division, the town of district significance of Sudzha is incorporated within Sudzhansky Municipal District as Sudzha Urban Settlement.
Sudzha () is the name of several inhabited localities in Russia.
Sudzha () is a town and the administrative center of Sudzhansky District in Kursk Oblast, Russia, located on the Sudzha and Olyoshnya Rivers southwest of Kursk, the administrative center of the oblast. Population:
Graduate of Moscow University. Well-known zemstvo man and for many years chairman of Sudzha Zemstvo Board. For his radical pronouncements at the sessions of Sudzha Uezd Committee to Study the Needs of Agricultural Industry, he was removed from his post by Plehve but reinstated under Sviatopolk-Mirsky.
Sudzhansky District () is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-eight in Kursk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southwest of the oblast. The area of the district is . Its administrative center is the town of Sudzha. Population: 31,466 (2002 Census); The population of Sudzha accounts for 22.4% of the district's total population.
Important tributaries of the river include: (R): Sudzha, Grun', and Khorol; (L): Pena, Grun'-Tashan', and Goltva.
Leonid Ivanovich Solomatkin (Russian: Леонид Иванович Соломаткин; 1837, Sudzha - 18 June 1883, Saint Petersburg) was a Russian genre painter in the Realistic style.
It was founded in 1664 as a part of the system of fortifications defending the southern approaches to Moscow. During World War II, Sudzha was occupied by German troops from October 18, 1941 to March 3, 1943.
The Urengoy–Pomary–Uzhhorod pipeline, originating from the Urengoy gas field, enters to Ukraine at the Sudzha gas metering station like Progress, the Kursk–Kyiv and the Yelets–Kursk–Dykanka pipelines. In Ukraine, it takes gas through to the Uzhhorod gas metering and pumping station on the Ukrainian border with Slovakia. Length of the Ukrainian section is and it has capacity of per year.
The Progress pipeline, originating from the Yamburg gas field, runs mostly parallel to the Urengoy–Pomary–Uzhhorod pipeline. It enters to Ukraine north of Sumy through the Sudzha gas metering station in Russia and leaves through the Uzhhorod gas metering and pumping station. The Ukrainian section has length of and it has capacity of per year.
Within the framework of administrative divisions, Kyakhta serves as the administrative center of Kyakhtinsky District. As an administrative division, it is, together with one rural locality (the settlement of Sudzha), incorporated within Kyakhtinsky District as the Town of Kyakhta. As a municipal division, the Town of Kyakhta is incorporated within Kyakhtinsky Municipal District as Kyakhta Urban Settlement.
Provisional Workers-Peasants Government of Ukraine () was provisional Soviet government created on November 28, 1918 in Kursk on decision of the Communist Party of Ukraine, the place of location was assigned the city of Sudzha. On the same day the government released its manifest. It became the highest legislative, executive and administrative body of Soviet power in Ukraine as the Soviet Russia resumed hostilities.
Bolshesoldatsky District is located in the south-central region of Kursk Oblast. The terrain is hilly plain averaging 200 meters above sea level; the district lies on the Orel-Kursk plateau of the Central Russian Upland. The main river in the district is the Sudzha River, which flows from east to west through the district into the Psel River, a tributary of the Dnieper River to the west. The Sudzha River is typically frozen from December to March. The district is 35 km southwest of the city of Kursk, and 490 km southwest of Moscow. The area measures 40 km (north-south), and 30 km (west-east). The administrative center is the town of Bolshoye Soldatskoye.
The Yelets–Kursk–Dykanka and the Kursk–Kyiv pipeline enter to Ukraine through the Sudzha gas metering station. The Torzhok–Smolensk–Mazyr–Dolyna pipeline enters Ukraine through the Mazur gas metering station and the Ivatsevichy–Dolyna pipeline enters through the Kobryn gas metering station, both in Belarus. The Komarno–Drozdovychi pipeline enters to Poland through the Drozdovychi metering station, the Uzhhorod–Berehove pipeline enters to Hungary through the Berehove metering station, and the Khust–Satu Mare pipeline enters to Romania through the Tekove metering station.
Throughout the crisis the Russian and Ukrainian sides blamed each other for the cutoff. On January 11 and 12, the European Union deployed an independent monitoring mission in an attempt to solve the crisis, but the mission met with little success. On January 12, Gazprom announced that it was willing to start delivering gas through the Sudzha metering station into the pipeline that traverses Ukraine towards Southeastern Europe, but Ukraine refused the offer for technical reasons and instead suggested an alternative route through Valuyki and Pisarevka metering stations, additionally insisting that supplies be fully restored. This was refused by Gazprom.
The Yelets–Kremenchuk–Kryvyi Rih pipeline enters into Ukraine through the Sudzha gas metering station. Length of the Ukrainian section of this pipeline is and it has capacity of per year. Length of the Kremenchuk–Ananyiv–Chernivtsi–Bohorodchany pipeline is and it has capacity of per year. It enters to Moldova through the Hrebenyky gas metering station and the reverse flow enters through the Oleksiyivka gas metering station. The Ananyiv–Tiraspol–Izmail pipeline enters Moldova through the Hrebenyky gas metering station, and the Shebelinka–Dnipropetrovsk–Kryvyi Rih–Izmail and the Rozdilna–Izmail pipelines enter through the Ryasnopil (Rozdilna) gas metering station. After re-entering to Ukraine all three pipelines exit to Romania through the Orlivka gas metering and pumping station. Length of the Ananyiv–Tiraspol–Izmail pipeline is and it has capacity of per year.
Within the framework of administrative divisions, Kyakhtinsky District is one of the twenty-one in the Republic of Buryatia. It is divided into one town (an administrative division with the administrative center in the town (an inhabited locality) of Kyakhta), one urban-type settlement (an administrative division with the administrative center in the urban-type settlement (inhabited locality) of Naushki), eight selsoviets, and five "somons", all of which comprise forty rural localities. As a municipal division, the district is incorporated as Kyakhtinsky Municipal District. The town (together with one rural locality—the settlement of Sudzha) and the urban-type settlement are incorporated as two urban settlements, and the eight selsoviets and five "somons" are incorporated as fifteen rural settlements within the municipal district. The town of Kyakhta serves as the administrative center of both the administrative and municipal district.
Talks between Naftohaz and Gazprom resumed overnight on 8 January 2009. Ukraine agreed to guarantee the unfettered transport of natural gas on the condition that Gazprom would guarantee and supply technical gas for Ukraine's gas transit system to function; this was denied by Russia. The supplies to Europe were not restored although the European Union, Ukraine, and Russia agreed to the deployment of an international monitoring group to the gas metering stations between Russia and Ukraine. Naftohaz blocked the transit of gas, blaming a lack of pressure in the pipeline system and saying the design of the Soviet-built pipeline meant it could not ship gas entering through the Sudzha metering station governing gas leaving through the Orlivka metering station without cutting off the Donetsk region, Luhansk region, and portions of the Dnipropetrovsk region of Ukraine. Naftohaz suggested a technically more feasible alternative through the Valuyki and Pisarevka metering stations but was refused.
On January 12, Gazprom announced that it was ready to start delivering gas through the Sudzha metering station that traverses Ukraine towards Southeastern Europe, but Ukraine refused the offer, claiming this would have left its eastern regions of Donetsk, Luhansk and portions of Dnipropetrovsk starved of gas. Naftogaz suggested an alternative route through the Valuyki and Pisarevka metering stations, but later added that it was unprepared to partially accept gas for transfer to Europe. It insisted that deliveries be fully restored because the system had been partially reconfigured to work in reverse in order to supply consumers in eastern Ukraine with backup supplies, and European transit pipelines were working in such a way that they were unable to accept Russian gas for transit to Europe without cutting off those eastern regions. Naftogaz added that a resumption of transit would require conclusion of a technical agreement. According to a report by the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies: "This reversal of one of the world’s largest gas transit systems was unprecedented. It seems hard to believe that it could have been undertaken spontaneously, which suggests that, whichever side precipitated the shutdown, Naftogaz's engineers had prepared for it." Gazprom rejected this counterproposal, saying that the Valuyki and Pisarevka routes were unsuitable for deliveries to Europe.