Synonyms for sycosis or Related words with sycosis

impetigo              keloidalis              erysipelas              contagiosa              carbuncles              folliculitis              barbae              dermatophytosis              herpeticum              trichophytia              intertrigo              ecthyma              interdigitalis              furuncles              pityriasis              faciale              paronychia              parapsoriasis              capillitii              blastomycetica              centrifugum              cruris              faciei              sporotrichosis              nummular              chilblains              verrucas              unguium              furuncle              erythrasma              mycetoma              ringworm              erysipeloid              sebohorreic              erosio              fulminans              scarlatina              scabies              cellulites              tiniea              excema              chronicus              verruca              vegetans              miliaria              balanitis              postular              erythrodermica              pseudofolliculitis              candidiases             



Examples of "sycosis"
Sycosis vulgaris (also known as "Barber's itch," and "Sycosis barbae") is a cutaneous condition characterized by a chronic infection of the chin or bearded region. The irritation is caused by a deep infection of hair follicles, often by species of "Staphylococcus" or "Propionibacterium" bacteria. Asymptomatic or painful and tender erythematous papules and pustules may form around coarse hair in the beard (sycosis barbae) or the back of the neck (sycosis nuchae).
Herpetic sycosis is a recurrent or initial herpes simplex infection affecting primarily the hair follicle.
Sycosis is an inflammation of hair follicles, especially of the beard area, and generally classified as papulopustular and chronic.
Lupoid sycosis is a cutaneous condition that is characterized by a scarring form of deep folliculitis, typically affecting the beard area.
use of colloidal mercuric sulphide, arsenicals, the treatment of early syphilis with electrically induced fever, tinea sycosis of the upper lip, tularemia, and congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma.
Following the example of Carl Linnaeus, Willan attempted a taxonomic classification of skin diseases, describing impetigo, lupus, psoriasis, scleroderma, ichthyosis, sycosis, and pemphigus. Willan's portrait was reproduced on the cover of the British Journal of Dermatology for many years. Willan and Bateman working together provided the world's first attempt to classify skin diseases from an anatomical standpoint.
In 1842 he described a microscopic cryptogam ("Trichophyton ectothrix") that is associated with a dermatological disease known as "sycosis barbae". Gruby also discovered "Candida (Monilia) albicans", the cause of candidiasis, and in 1843 he described a fungus ("Microsporum audouinii") that is the cause of a type of ringworm. This fungus was named after naturalist Jean Victor Audouin (1797–1842).
In 1930, Cecil George Paine, a pathologist at the Royal Infirmary in Sheffield, attempted to use penicillin to treat sycosis barbae, eruptions in beard follicles, but was unsuccessful. Moving on to ophthalmia neonatorum, a gonococcal infection in infants, he achieved the first recorded cure with penicillin, on November 25, 1930. He then cured four additional patients (one adult and three infants) of eye infections, and failed to cure a fifth.
Hahnemann’s hypotheses for the direct or remote cause of all chronic diseases (miasms) originally presented only three, psora (the itch), syphilis (venereal disease) or sycosis (fig-wart disease). Of these three the most important was "psora" (Greek for "itch"), described as being related to any itching diseases of the skin, supposed to be derived from suppressed scabies, and claimed to be the foundation of many further disease conditions. Hahnemann believed psora to be the cause of such diseases as epilepsy, cancer, jaundice, deafness, and cataracts.
Tinea barbæ (also known as "Barber's itch," "Ringworm of the beard," and "Tinea sycosis") is a fungal infection of the hair. Tinea barbae is due to a dermatophytic infection around the bearded area of men. Generally, the infection occurs as a follicular inflammation, or as a cutaneous granulomatous lesion, i.e. a chronic inflammatory reaction. It is one of the causes of Folliculitis. It is most common among agricultural workers, as the transmission is more common from animal-to-human than human-to-human. The most common causes are "Trichophyton mentagrophytes" and "T. verrucosum".
"Tinea barbæ" (also known as "Barber's itch," "Ringworm of the beard," and "Tinea sycosis") is a fungal infection of the hair. Tinea barbae is due to a dermatophytic infection around the bearded area of men. Generally, the infection occurs as a follicular inflammation, or as a cutaneous granulomatous lesion, i.e. a chronic inflammatory reaction. It is one of the causes of folliculitis. It is most common among agricultural workers, as the transmission is more common from animal-to-human than human-to-human. The most common causes are "Trichophyton mentagrophytes" and "T. verrucosum".
Neonatal herpes simplex is a HSV infection in an infant. It is a rare but serious condition, usually caused by vertical transmission of HSV-1 or -2) from mother to newborn. During immunodeficiency, herpes simplex can cause unusual lesions in the skin. One of the most striking is the appearance of clean linear erosions in skin creases, with the appearance of a knife cut. Herpetic sycosis is a recurrent or initial herpes simplex infection affecting primarily the hair follicles. Eczema herpeticum is an infection with herpesvirus in patients with chronic atopic dermatitis may result in spread of herpes simples throughout the eczematous areas.
For decades biologists had been at work on the medicine that became penicillin. In 1928, Scottish biologist Alexander Fleming discovered a substance which killed a number of disease-causing bacteria. In 1929, he named the new substance penicillin. His publications were largely ignored at first but it became a significant antibiotic in the 1930s. In 1930, Cecil George Paine, a pathologist at the Royal Infirmary in Sheffield, attempted to use penicillin to treat sycosis barbae, eruptions in beard follicles, but was unsuccessful. Moving on to ophthalmia neonatorum, a gonococcal infection in infants, he achieved the first recorded cure with penicillin, on November 25, 1930. He then cured four additional patients (one adult and three infants) of eye infections, and failed to cure a fifth.