Synonyms for tawergha or Related words with tawergha

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Examples of "tawergha"
Tawergha means "the green island" in the Berber language.
On 19 August, three rebels were killed in fighting around Tawergha.
When the Libyan army weakened, Tawergha became the first target for NTC Misratan brigades, although individuals suspected of being pro-Gaddafi had been the objective of revenge killings since February 2011. According to Amnesty International, anti-Gaddafi forces did not allow the population of Tawerga to flee. On 12 August, anti-Gaddafi forces claimed to have captured Tawergha.
On 18 August, rebels claimed to have found a mass grave consisting of 150 civilians executed by Gaddafi's forces near Tawergha.
During the Roman times, Tawergha gained a lot of attention due to its position and the connection that it had to the sand route that connected the city of Sirte along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea to Egypt. Control of Tawergha helped the Romans coordinate control of Libya.
Tawergha lies on the road from Sirte (Muammar Gaddafi's hometown) to the city of Misrata. As a result, during the Libyan Civil War, Tawergha was used as a centre of military operations against Misrata, which rose up against Gaddafi in February 2011. During this time, Misratans accuse Tawerghans of leading the two-month siege of Misrata, as well as raping their women and cutting off the penises of their captured men.
Abdul Hassan is a Libyan rebel commander who leads the Al Horia Brigade and led them in the Battle of Tawergha of the Libyan Civil War.
"The Sunday Telegraph" reported on 11 September that almost the entire population of Tawergha, a town of about 10,000 people, had been forced to flee their homes by anti-Gaddafi fighters after their takeover of the settlement. The report suggested that Tawergha, which was dominated by black Libyans, may have been the subject of an ethnic cleansing provoked by a combination of racism and bitterness on the part of Misratan fighters over the Tawergha's support for Gaddafi during the siege of Misrata.
"The Sunday Telegraph" reported on 11 September that almost the entire population of Tawergha, a town of about 10,000 people, had been forced to flee their homes by anti-Gaddafi fighters after their takeover of the settlement. The report suggested that Tawergha, which was dominated by black Libyans, may have been the subject of ethnic cleansing provoked by a combination of racism and bitterness on the part of Misratan fighters over the town's support for Gaddafi during the siege of Misrata.
The Battle of Tawergha was a military engagement of the Libyan Civil War that began on 11 August 2011 when anti-Gaddafi forces based in Misrata advanced southeast along the road to Sirte in the early morning and attacked Libyan Army positions in the town of Tawergha. It ended on 13 August when rebel troops, after capturing the town, cleared it of snipers and artillery positions threatening Misrata.
The town of Tawergha, which supported Gaddafi prior to its capture by anti-Gaddafi fighters in August, has been emptied of its mostly black inhabitants in what appeared to be a "major reprisal against supporters of the Gaddafi regime", according to an 11 September report from "The Sunday Telegraph", and commanders of the Misrata Brigade are refusing to allow the displaced townspeople to return. One commander was quoted as saying, "Tawergha no longer exists."
infrastructure to avoid the return of Tawergha inhabitants. Militias from Misrata continue to hunt down and terrorize the displaced inhabitants of Tawergha across Libya. Hundreds have been illegally arrested and tortured by militiamen in Misrata. In May 2012, the UN Human Rights Council's Commission of Inquiry published a report about the violations conducted by Misratan militias against Tawerghans across Libya including killings, arbitrarily arrests and torture, calling it a war crime.
British journalist Andrew Gilligan visited Tawergha in September 2011 and found it virtually emptied of its inhabitants, who numbered around 30,000 before the war. He reported that the Misrata Brigade, a semi-autonomous unit of the anti-Gaddafi National Liberation Army, had engaged in a campaign of ethnic cleansing in response to the town's alleged support of Gaddafi during the siege on their city. Many slogans he saw painted in and around Tawergha, as well as the accounts of anti-Gaddafi fighters and commanders whom he quoted, made reference to the dark pigmentation of many Tawergha citizens, with one sign referring to the Misrata Brigade as "the brigade for purging slaves [and] black skin". His report, published by "The Sunday Telegraph" on 11 September, quoted Ibrahim al-Halbous a brigade commander as saying, "Tawergha no longer exists, only Misrata" and another as asserting that the town's former residents will only return "over our dead bodies". In February 2012, Amnesty reported that Tawerga was empty and guarded against any returnees, with Misrata militiamen systematically destroying and burning down homes and
On 13 August, Gaddafi's Deputy Foreign Minister Khaled Kaim stated that the rebel assault on Tawergha had failed, saying tribesmen from Bani Walid had rallied to the fight the previous evening and pushed rebel forces all the way back to Misrata. This claim was not independently verified. The rebels themselves claimed that they were closing in on the last sniper and pro-Gaddafi artillery positions in the town. By the end of the day, a spokesperson for the National Transitional Council said Tawergha had been secured. Twelve anti-Gaddafi fighters were killed during the operation, Commander Ibrahim Halbus told BBC News.
The Battle of the Misrata frontline was a battle during the Libyan Civil War between pro-Gaddafi loyalists and anti-Gaddafi forces on the western and southwestern outskirts of Misrata, the third largest city in Libya. It ended when anti-Gaddafi soldiers secured Zliten to the west and Tawergha to the south, establishing a significant buffer zone around the city.
Sporadic fighting continued for several weeks after the rebels established control over the city. Although there was no further combat in Misrata itself, government troops still surrounded the area on all sides, and occasionally directed artillery and rocket fire at the city. For more than a month, heavy frontline fighting and shelling raged nearby at Dafniya and Tawergha.
On 6 February, seven male black Libyan civilians from Tawergha were killed by militias who raided their makeshift refugee camp at a former naval academy in Janzour, a suburb of Tripoli. The survivors said that they appeared to be from Misrata because of their license plates, though the Misrata militia denied this.
On 11 August, rebel forces, including 3–6 tanks, advanced on Tawergha from the south and east. Al-Jazeera described the offensive as "a heavily co-ordinated operation with NATO", which reportedly carried out air strikes against loyalist forces in support of the rebels.
On 28 May, rebels and loyalists fought at Tawergha, 40 kilometres south of Misrata, where rebels claimed to had captured a hospital which contained numerous weapons and tanks. Fighting also raged 25 kilometres east of Misrata. In all, 8-10 rebels were reported to have died in the fighting and 15-40 were wounded. Two loyalist soldiers were captured and an unknown number killed.
Tawergha (Berber: ⵜⴰⵡⴻⵔⵖⴰ, ), also transliterated "Tawarga", "Tauorga", "Taworgha", "Tawurgha" or "Torghae", is, as of August 2011, a ghost town in Libya that is under administrative jurisdiction of the city of Misrata, which is 38 kilometers away. It was the site of intense fighting during the Libyan Civil War before its capture and ethnic cleansing by anti-Gaddafi forces in August 2011.