Synonyms for throated_caracara or Related words with throated_caracara

throated_robin_irania              cheeked_tit              eyed_parakeet_psittacara              tailed_hillstar              naped_pigeon_columba              cinnyris_talatala              bellied_cuckooshrike              throated_redstart              crested_elaenia_elaenia_albiceps              monasa_morphoeus              throated_honeyeater              melanozanthos              lc_rhipidura              capped_redstart_chaimarrornis_leucocephalus              tipped_dove_leptotila              plumed_honeyeater              urochroa              monkey_ateles_marginatus              tailed_wheatear_oenanthe_leucopyga              fronted_nunbird              bellied_woodpecker_dryocopus_javensis              collared_seedeater_sporophila_torqueola              crowned_pigeon_patagioenas              crowned_hornbill              bellied_antbird              leucophthalmus              bellied_bustard_eupodotis_senegalensis              headed_duck_oxyura              faced_heron_egretta              tailed_crested_flycatcher              slate_colored_seedeater              asiatica_zenaida_dove_zenaida              winged_cuckooshrike              white_winged_redstart              throated_crake              naped_tit              spotted_flufftail_sarothrura_pulchra              ensipennis              naped_lory              hodgson_redstart              collared_starling              throated_laughingthrush_garrulax              winged_magpie              lr_lc_genus_mungos              throated_munia_euodice_malabarica              eared_puffbird              striped_woodcreeper              tailed_stonechat              versicolurus              throated_bulbul             



Examples of "throated_caracara"
This species inhabits the humid lowland forests of Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, and Venezuela. The slow flight of the red-throated caracara makes it suited it to fly in the understory of the forest where the vegetation is thin. The sparse vegetation gives the red-throated caracara greater visibility to spot food and predators. The ornate hawk-eagle and the black-and-white hawk-eagle are predators of the red-throated caracara.
The red-throated caracara hunts in the canopies and the understory of the lowland jungle, foraging mainly for insect nests. Most red-throated caracaras hunt silently, but occasionally make soft caws and sometimes hunt in groups. When hunting in groups, one or two individuals scout for predators in the canopy, while the remaining flock hunts in the understory. The red-throated caracara is highly territorial, with four to eight individuals in a group.
Nargana Wilderness Area is a 98,999 ha reserve in Guna Yala, Panama run by the Kuna people. It is known for its bird watching opportunities and is home to black-crowned antpitta, speckled antshrike, and red-throated caracara.
The black caracara ("Daptrius ater") is a species of bird of prey in the Falconidae family. Its genus Daptrius is often considered monotypic today, though some also include the red-throated caracara otherwise separated in "Ibycter".
Unlike the "Falco" falcons in the same family, the birds in the five relevant genera are not fast-flying aerial hunters, but are comparatively slow and are often scavengers (a notable exception being the red-throated caracara).
The red-throated caracara ("Ibycter americanus") is a social species of bird of prey in the family Falconidae. It is placed in the monotypic genus Ibycter, or sometimes united in Daptrius with the black caracara. Unique among caracaras, it mainly feeds on the larvae of bees and wasps, but also takes the adult insects and fruits and berries.
Caracaras are principally birds of South and Central America. They are classified in five genera and 11 species of which one is extinct since 1906. Unlike the "Falco" falcons in the same family, the birds in the five relevant genera are not fast-flying aerial hunters, but are comparatively slow and are often scavengers (a notable exception being the red-throated caracara).
Falco's species is that of a raptor, most likely a falcon called a red-throated caracara. His general head shape suggest that of a raptor, but one interesting characteristic, which traces back to the early character designs, is his color. While his shape is that of a bird of prey, his colors are that of a pheasant. Material recently revealed in interviews with designers reveals that Falco was actually originally intended to be a pheasant.
The mountain caracara ("Phalcoboenus megalopterus", Spanish: "corequenque") is a species of bird of prey in the family Falconidae. It is found in puna and páramo in the Andes, ranging from southern Ecuador, through Peru and Bolivia, to northern Argentina and Chile. It is generally uncommon to fairly common. It resembles the closely related Carunculated Caracara and White-throated Caracara, but unlike those species, its chest is uniform black. Juveniles are far less distinctive than the red-faced pied adults, being overall brown with dull pinkish-grey facial skin.
This bird usually moves through the forest canopy in mixed species flocks. It is an omnivore, foraging for fruits and insects among the leaves and branches. By consuming whole fruits, it acts as a seed disperser. It is one of several birds that follow small groups of red-throated caracara ("Ibycter americanus") through the canopy. The caracaras are specialist predators of wasp nests, and the oropendolas have been observed following the group for several hours, feeding independently and not necessarily at the same level in the canopy nor on the same items of diet.
The white-throated caracara ("Phalcoboenus albogularis") is a species of bird of prey in the Falconidae family. It is found in grasslands and other barren habitats in the Andes of southern Chile and Argentina. It is generally uncommon to fairly common. A highly opportunistic bird commonly seen walking on the ground, it will feed on both carrion and virtually any small animal it can catch. It resembles the closely related mountain caracara, but unlike that species its underparts (including chest and throat) are entirely white. Juveniles are far less distinctive than the yellow-faced pied adults, being overall brown with dull pinkish-grey facial skin.
The Mountain Caracara is closely related to the other birds of the genus "Phalcoboenus", a group which separated from the rest of the Caracaras around 1.9 million years ago. The White-throated Caracara ("Phalcoboenus albogularis") is the Mountain Caracara's closest relative and there have been recordings of hybridization events between the two species. They differ mostly by the colour of their plumage and by their habitat preference. It is supposed that the "Phalcoboenus" taxa diverged within themselves roughly 0.6 million years ago when there was a large amount of glacial activity in the area.