Synonyms for tuskfish or Related words with tuskfish

choerodon              panchax              ostracion              taeniatus              chrysiptera              threadtail              jawfish              twinspot              parapercis              randalli              cardinalfish              aplocheilus              girella              brotula              rubberlip              hydrolagus              rockskipper              opistognathus              myersi              lunulata              halichoeres              leatherjacket              lithognathus              scorpionfish              ruficauda              sandperch              melanops              pomacentrus              inornatus              gymnothorax              capistrata              flavifrons              myctophum              cheilopogon              chlorurus              nigromaculatus              aterrimus              gouldii              splitfin              nigripinnis              soldierfish              dottyback              strigatus              myripristis              immaculatus              basslet              trilineata              chalcopsitta              meliphaga              chalybea             



Examples of "tuskfish"
The harlequin tuskfish is a carnivore, eating mostly benthic invertebrates such as echinoderms, crustaceans, molluscs, and worms.
The harlequin tuskfish, "Choerodon fasciatus", is a species of wrasse native to the western Pacific Ocean. It occasionally makes its way into the aquarium trade.
In July 2011, a professional diver photographed a blackspot tuskfish bashing a clam on a rock to break the shell, apparently a use of the rock as a tool, the first documented example of tool use in Osteichthyes.
The bluespotted tuskfish, "Choerodon cauteroma", is a species of wrasse native to the coastal waters of northwestern Australia. They occur in reef environments, preferring areas with sandy substrates or weedy growth. This species can reach a length of .
The orange-dotted tuskfish, "Choerodon anchorago", is a species of wrasse native to the Indian Ocean from Sri Lanka eastward to French Polynesia in the western Pacific. Its range extends north to the Ryukyus and south to New Caledonia. It inhabits reefs at depths from . This species can reach a length of . It is commercially important, and can be found in the aquarium trade.
In Hong Kong, "Diadema setosum" is omnipresent in rocky reefs, with a population density of up to one individual per 3.4m. The unusually large number of these urchins is theorised to be partly natural, and partly due to overfishing of its primary predator in the region, the Blackspot tuskfish ("Cheorodon schoenleinii").
Several species build up mounds of coral pieces either to protect the entrance to their burrows, as in tilefishes and gobies of the genus Valenciennea, or to protect the patch of sand in which they will bury themselves for the night, as in the Jordan's tuskfish "Choerodon jordani" and the rockmover wrasse "Novaculichthys taeniourus".
Tsing Yi (青衣) iterally means "green (or blue) clothes", but is also a kind of fish, probably blackspot tuskfish, once abundant in nearby waters. People named the island after the fish. Tsing Yi Tam (青衣潭, "lit." Tsing Yi Pool) or Tsing Yi Tam Shan (青衣潭山, "lit." Tsing Yi Pool Hill) also appeared on some early Chinese maps.
The blue tuskfish, "Choerodon cyanodus", is a species of wrasse native to the Indian and western Pacific Oceans, where it is known to occur around Australia, but has been claimed to occur more widely. It inhabits reefs. This species can reach a length of . It can be found in the aquarium trade.
Several species of wrasses have been observed using rocks as anvils to crack bivalve (scallops, urchins and clams) shells. It was first filmed in an orange-dotted tuskfish ("Choerodon anchorago") in 2009 by Giacomo Bernardi. The fish fans sand to unearth the bivalve, takes it into its mouth, swims several metres to a rock which it uses as an anvil by smashing the mollusc apart with sideward thrashes of the head. This behaviour has been recorded in a blackspot tuskfish ("Choerodon schoenleinii") on Australia's Great Barrier Reef, yellowhead wrasse ("Halichoeres garnoti") in Florida and a six-bar wrasse ("Thalassoma hardwicke") in an aquarium setting. These species are at opposite ends of the phylogenetic tree in this family, so this behaviour may be a deep-seated trait in all wrasses.
Several species of wrasses have been observed using rocks as anvils to crack bivalve (scallops, urchins and clams) shells. This behavior was first filmed in an orange-dotted tuskfish ("Choerodon anchorago") in 2009 by Giacomo Bernardi. The fish fans sand to unearth the bivalve, takes it into its mouth, swims several meters to a rock, which it then uses as an anvil by smashing the mollusc apart with sideward thrashes of the head. This behaviour has also been recorded in a blackspot tuskfish ("Choerodon schoenleinii") on Australia's Great Barrier Reef, yellowhead wrasse ("Halichoeres garnoti") in Florida and a six-bar wrasse ("Thalassoma hardwicke") in an aquarium setting. These species are at opposite ends of the phylogenetic tree in this family, so this behaviour may be a deep-seated trait in all wrasses.
Several species of wrasse hold bivalves (scallops, clams and urchins) in their mouth and smash them against the surface of a rock (an "anvil") to break them up. This behaviour in an orange-dotted tuskfish ("Choerodon anchorago") has been filmed; the fish fans sand to unearth the bivalve, takes it into its mouth, swims several metres to a rock which it uses as an anvil by smashing the mollusc apart with sideward thrashes of the head.
The blackspot tuskfish, "Choerodon schoenleinii", is a wrasse native to the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific Ocean from Mauritius to Indonesia and Australia north to the Ryukyus. This species occurs on reefs, preferring areas with sandy substrates or areas of weed growth. It can be found at depths from , though rarely deeper than . It can reach in TL, and the greatest published weight for this species is . It is important to local commercial fisheries and is also farmed. It is popular as a game fish and can be found in the aquarium trade.