Synonyms for uliginosa or Related words with uliginosa

stricta              sessiliflora              glabrescens              oblongifolia              auriculata              microphyllum              speciosum              uniflora              multifida              radlk              heliotropium              rotundifolium              squarrosa              chamaesyce              vestita              subulata              laxiflora              sessilifolia              microcephala              recurva              acutifolia              berteroana              wahlenbergia              pedicellata              stenophylla              triflora              micrantha              mucronata              caulescens              floribundum              congesta              pauciflora              ramosissima              ciliata              virgata              campanulata              cuneifolia              oppositifolia              pedunculata              fastigiata              foliosa              ligularia              peduncularis              latifolium              grewia              spathulata              connata              hirtella              laevigatum              longiflora             



Examples of "uliginosa"
"Caladenia uliginosa" subsp. "uliginosa" is classified as "not threatened" by the Western Australian Government Department of Parks and Wildlife.
Salvia uliginosa (bog sage) is a species of flowering plant in the family Lamiaceae, native to southern Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina. It was described and named by botanist George Bentham for its typical habitat "of swamps and marshes", or "uliginosa".
The larvae feed on "Solidago uliginosa", "Helianthus grosseserratus" and "Aster" species.
"Caladenia uliginosa" was first described in 1984 by Alex George from a specimen collected near Frankland and the description was published in "Nuytsia". In 2001, Stephen Hopper and Andrew Phillip Brown described three subspecies, including subspecies "uliginosa" and the description was also published in "Nuytsia". The specific epithet ("uliginosa") is a Latin word meaning "full of moisture", "wet" or "marshy" referring to the swampy habitat where this orchid usually grows.
Knema uliginosa is a species of plant in the family Myristicaceae. It is endemic to Borneo.
The larva has been recorded on "Derris uliginosa", "Milletia pachycarpa" and "Pongamia" species.
"Caladenia uliginosa" subsp. "candicans" is classified as "not threatened" by the Western Australian Government Department of Parks and Wildlife.
Selaginella uliginosa is a small perennial plant found in Australia. An ancient and primitive plant, usually under 10 centimetres tall, it is often seen in sunny moist areas. The specific epithet "uliginosa" is from Latin, referring to the plant's preference to grow in swampy locations.
Caladenia uliginosa" subsp. "uliginosa, commonly known as the dainty spider orchid, or darting spider orchid is a plant in the orchid family Orchidaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It has a single hairy leaf and up to four greenish-cream flowers which have a forward-projecting labellum with a dark red tip.
Caladenia uliginosa" subsp. "candicans, commonly known as the northern darting spider orchid, is a plant in the orchid family Orchidaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It has a single hairy leaf and up to three yellowish-cream flowers which have a forward-projecting labellum lacking the red tip of subspecies "uliginosa".
Eosphaeria is a genus of fungi within the Lasiosphaeriaceae family. This is a monotypic genus, containing the single species Eosphaeria uliginosa.
Shorea uliginosa is a species of plant in the Dipterocarpaceae family. It is a tree found in Sumatra, Peninsular Malaysia and Borneo.
The larvae feed on "Stellaria" species (including "Stellaria uliginosa" and "Stellaria graminea") and "Cerastium fontanum". They feed in the terminal shoots of their host plant.
"Caladenia uliginosa" was first described in 1984 by Alex George and the description was published in "Nuytsia". In 2001, Stephen Hopper and Andrew Phillip Brown described three subspecies, including subspecies "patulens" and the description was also published in "Nuytsia" from a specimen collected near Harvey. The subspecies name ("patulens") is derived from the Latin word "patulus" meaning "spread out" or "open" referring to the lateral sepals and petals which are more spreading in this subspecies than in subspecies "uliginosa".
Phytophthora uliginosa is a non-papillate homothallic plant pathogen that mainly infects European oak. It differs from other species of the genus (like "P. fragariae") by its large oogonia with exclusively paragynous antheridia and the predominant occurrence of ellipsoid sporangia with markedly wide exit pores. "P. Uliginosa" is separated from "P. europaea" by its larger oogonia without tapering bases and its greater aggressiveness on "Q. Robur".
"M. triquetra" is easily recognized by its distinct three-ranked leaf arrangement and for being dioicous. It may be distinguished from "M. uliginosa" by its squarrose leaves; narrow costa relative to the size of the leaf base; serrate, planar leaf margins; and acute leaf tips. In contrast, "M. uliginosa" a wide (up to 1/3 of the leaf base) costa, entire, revolute leaf margins, and blunt apices. Other "Meesia" species also have blunt apices.
Cyanosalvianin, the blue pigment from the flowers of "S. uliginosa", is a metalloanthocyanin, a complex formed of six molecules of the anthocyanin type, six molecules of the flavone type and two magnesium ions.
This species was formerly thought to be growing in Sonoma County but that population has been recently reclassified as another species, "Potentilla uliginosa" and is presumed extinct in that county.
"Salvia uliginosa" was introduced into horticulture in 1912, and has become popular in gardens and public landscapes for its azure-blue flowers, ability to grow under various conditions, and its pollinator habitat attributes.
"Meesia uliginosa" may be distinguished from "M. triquetra" by its lack of tristichous growth habit, relatively wide costa, entire and revolute leaf margins, blunt leaf apex, and autoicous sexual condition.