Synonyms for ustyuzhensky_uyezd or Related words with ustyuzhensky_uyezd

tikhvinsky_uyezd              novgorod_governorate              kirillovsky_uyezd              starorussky_uyezd              cherepovetsky_uyezd              uyezds              vologda_governorate              pskov_governorate              kargopolsky_uyezd              novgorodsky_uyezd              vesyegonsky              borovichsky_uyezd              bezhetsky              novorzhevsky              uyezd              olonets_governorate              arkhangelsk_governorate              umbskaya              novgorod_viceroyalty              varzuzhskaya              vesyegonsky_uyezd              kadnikovsky_uyezd              velikoluksky              velikiye_luki_okrug              kimrsky              leningrad_okrug              lodeynopolsky_uyezd              nevelsky              mezensky_uyezd              kashinsky              zubtsovsky              sebezhsky              vologda_viceroyalty              tosnensky_districts              pskov_okrug              opochetsky              luga_okrug              belgorod_governorate              kemsky_uyezd              irkutsk_governorate              krestetsky              kingiseppsky              tver_viceroyalty              detskoselsky              tver_governorate              volost              saint_petersburg_governorate              vologodsky              okruhas              toropetsky             



Examples of "ustyuzhensky_uyezd"
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, it was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1738, Ustyuzhna was chartered and became the seat of Ustyuzhensky Uyezd. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and Ustyuzhensky Uyezd was transferred to Novgorod Governorate.
The western part of the area was in 1708 included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. The area became a part of Ustyuzhensky Uyezd of Belozersk Oblast of Novgorod Governorate. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1777, Cherepovetsky Uyezd was established, and the area was transferred to it. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and the area was transferred to Novgorod Governorate. Cherepovetsky Uyezd was abolished and merged into Ustyuzhensky Uyezd. However, in 1802 Cherepovetsky Uyezd was re-established.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, Ustyuzhna was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate) and named one of the towns constituting the governorate. In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off, which included Ustyuzhna as a part of its Belozersk Province. In 1738, Ustyuzhna was chartered and became the seat of Ustyuzhensky Uyezd. In 1776, the uyezd was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished and Ustyuzhensky Uyezd was transferred to Novgorod Governorate.
The "selo" of Nikolskoye was known since 1590. In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, it was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate split off. The area became part of Ustyuzhensky Uyezd of Belozersk Oblast of Novgorod Governorate. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1777, Cherepovetsky Uyezd was established, and the area was transferred to it. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and the area was transferred to Novgorod Governorate. Cherepovetsky Uyezd was abolished and merged into Ustyuzhensky Uyezd. However, in 1802 Cherepovetsky Uyezd was reestablished. In the early 19th century, the Mariinsky Canal system was constructed.
It was first mentioned as a village in 1545. In 1882, a metallurgical plant, which produced telegraph wires, nails, and hooks, was built here. The railway station opened in 1901, boosting development. Before 1918, Babayevo was a part of Ustyuzhensky Uyezd of Novgorod Governorate. In June 1918, five uyezds of Novgorod Governorate, including Ustyuzhensky Uyezd, were split off to form Cherepovets Governorate, with the administrative center in Cherepovets. In 1925, Babayevo was granted town status. On August 1, 1927, Cherepovets Governorate was abolished and its territory became Cherepovets Okrug of Leningrad Oblast. At the same time, uyezds were abolished and Babayevsky District was established. Babayevo became the administrative center of the district. On September 23, 1937, Babayevsky District was transferred to newly established Vologda Oblast.
The area was sparsely populated until the 19th century. In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, it was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and the area, which was a part of Ustyuzhensky Uyezd, was transferred to Novgorod Governorate.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and the area, then a part of Ustyuzhensky Uyezd, was transferred to Novgorod Governorate.
In June 1918, five uyezds of Novgorod Governorate, including Ustyuzhensky Uyezd, were split off to form Cherepovets Governorate, with the administrative center in Cherepovets. On August 1, 1927, Cherepovets Governorate was abolished and its territory became Cherepovets Okrug of Leningrad Oblast. At the same time, uyezds were abolished and Ustyuzhensky District was established, with the administrative center in Ustyuzhna. On September 23, 1937, Ustyuzhensky District was transferred to newly established Vologda Oblast and remained there ever since.
In June 1918, five uyezds of Novgorod Governorate, including Ustyuzhensky Uyezd, were split off to form Cherepovets Governorate, with the administrative center in Cherepovets. On August 1, 1927, Cherepovets Governorate was abolished, and Cherepovets Okrug of Leningrad Oblast was established on its former territory. Simultaneously, uyezds were abolished, and Ustyuzhensky District was established, with the administrative center in the town of Ustyuzhna. On September 23, 1937, Ustyuzhensky District was transferred to newly established Vologda Oblast and remained there ever since.
In the 1910s, a railway between Sonkovo and Mga was built. The railway station which is now located in the town of Pestovo was named after the village of Russkoye Pestovo, located from the station. The first train arrived to the station in 1915. The name of Russkoye Pestovo, and subsequently the name of Pestovo, originates from the personal Novgorodian name Pest. At the time, the area was a part of Ustyuzhensky Uyezd in Cherepovets Governorate.
The settlement of Chagoda was founded in 1926 as Bely Bychok to serve a new glass making factory. At the time, it belonged to Ustyuzhensky Uyezd of Novgorod Governorate. In June 1918, five uyezds of Novgorod Governorate, including Ustyuzhensky Uyezd, were split off to form Cherepovets Governorate, with the administrative center in Cherepovets. On August 1, 1927 Cherepovets Governorate was abolished, and its area became Cherepovets Okrug of Leningrad Oblast. Simultaneously, uyezds were abolished, and Bely Bychok became part of Verkhne-Chagodoshchensky District (with the center is the "selo" of Belye Kresty). In 1932 the district was renamed into Chagodoshchensky District, and Bely Bychok obtained the status of urban-type settlement. Between 1932 and 1935, the district center was located in Bely Bychok, but in 1935 it was transferred back to Belye Kresty. On September 23, 1937 Chagodoshchensky District was transferred to newly established Vologda Oblast. In 1939, Bely Bychok was renamed into Chagoda. During the aborted administrative reform of the 1960s, Chagodoshchensky District was briefly disestablished and then reestablished in 1965. After the reestablishment, Chagoda became the administrative center of the district.
In the 19th century, the place where Yefimovsky is currently located, was a part of Sominskaya Volost of Ustyuzhensky Uyezd, Novgorod Governorate. In 1918, it was transferred in newly created Cherepovets Governorate. In the second half of the 19th century (the dates of 1862 and 1882 are mentioned in the sources) a glass-making factory was built by Lanko, a German merchant. The settlement serving the glass-making factory was known as Bystroretsky and is currently a part of Yefimovsky (Bystroretskaya Street). In 1905, a railway station was opened on the railway connecting Podborovye and Tikhvin. The name of the station was Somino, however, in 1908 it was renamed Yefimovskaya. The settlement of Yefimovsky was initially serving the railway station.
The Sheksna was always one of the main waterways connecting central Russia with Lake Onega and with the Northern Dvina. In the 13th century, the areas along the Sheksna were controlled by the Principality of Beloozero, and in the 14th century they became a part of the Grand Duchy of Moscow. In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the east of the current area of the district was included into Ustyuzhensky Uyezd of Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1777, the town of Cherepovets was founded as a merger of several villages, and in 1802, it became the seat of Cherepovetsky Uyezd of Novgorod Governorate (into which the viceroyalty was transformed in 1796).
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, a separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. The current area of the district was split between Belozersky Uyezd (north of the Kolp) and Ustyuzhensky Uyezd (south of the Kolp). In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and both uyezds were transferred to Novgorod Governorate. Babayevo, then a village, developed as a settlement around an iron production plant in the 19th century. Important historic route - St.Petersburg-Tikhvin-Belozersk tract - runs via this district and crosses the Suda River at Borisovo-Sudskoye. Borisovo-Sudskoye become important trading and fair location in the 19th century. Khvalevskoye Manor is located here, a country seat of Russian noble family Kachalov.
Sazonovo was founded in 1923 as a selo around the Pokrovsky (since 1924 Sazonovsky) glass-making factory. It had the name of Belye Kresty and belonged to Ustyuzhensky Uyezd of Cherepovets Governorate. On August 1, 1927 Cherepovets Governorate was abolished, and its area became Cherepovets Okrug of Leningrad Oblast. Simultaneously, uyezds were abolished, and Verkhne-Chagodoshchensky District was established, with the center in Belye Kresty. In 1932 the district was renamed into Chagodoshchensky District, and between 1932 and 1935, the district center was located in the urban-type settlement of Bely Bychok (currently Chagoda), but in 1935 it was transferred back to Belye Kresty. On September 23, 1937 Chagodoshchensky District was transferred to newly established Vologda Oblast. In 1947, Belye Kresty was renamed into Sazonovo and obtained the status of urban-type settlement. During the aborted administrative reform of the 1960s, Chagodoshchensky District was briefly disestablished and then reestablished in 1965. After the reestablishment, Chagoda became the district center.
In June 1918, five uyezds of Novgorod Governorate, including Ustyuzhensky Uyezd, were split off to form Cherepovets Governorate, with the administrative center in Cherepovets. On August 1, 1927, Cherepovets Governorate was abolished, and its area became Cherepovets Okrug of Leningrad Oblast. Simultaneously, the uyezds were abolished, and Verkhne-Chagodoshchensky District was established, with the administrative center in the "selo" of Belye Kresty. In 1932, the district was renamed Chagodoshchensky, and Bely Bychok was granted urban-type settlement status. Between 1932 and 1935, the administrative center of the district was in the urban-type settlement of Bely Bychok, but in 1935 it was transferred back to Belye Kresty. On September 23, 1937, Chagodoshchensky District was transferred to newly established Vologda Oblast. In 1939, Bely Bychok was renamed Chagoda. In 1947, Belye Kresty was renamed Sazonovo and was granted urban-type settlement status. During the abortive Khrushchyov administrative reform of the 1960s, Chagodoshchensky District was briefly disestablished in 1962 and then reestablished in 1965. After the reestablishment, Chagoda became the administrative center of the district.
In June 1918, five uyezds of Novgorod Governorate, including Ustyuzhensky Uyezd, were split off to form Cherepovets Governorate, with the administrative center in Cherepovets. On August 1, 1927, Cherepovets Governorate was abolished, and its area became Cherepovets Okrug of Leningrad Oblast. Simultaneously, uyezds were abolished, and, effective October 1, 1927, Pestovsky District was established within Cherepovets Okrug, with the administrative center in the settlement of Pestovo. On September 19, 1927, Pestovo was granted work settlement status. On July 23, 1930, the okrugs were abolished, and the districts were directly subordinated to the oblast. In 1930, a minor part of Mikhaylovsky District of Moscow Oblast was transferred to Pestovsky District. On July 5, 1944, Pestovsky District was transferred to newly established Novgorod Oblast and remained there ever since. On February 1, 1963, the district was transformed into Pestovsky Rural District in the course of the Nikita Khrushchev's abortive administrative reform. On January 12, 1965, this was reverted; at the same time Pestovo was granted town status.