Synonyms for varzuzhskaya or Related words with varzuzhskaya

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Examples of "varzuzhskaya"
In 1828, Tetrinskaya slobodka, Pyalitskaya slobodka, and the "selo" of Ponoy were merged into Varzuzhskaya Volost.
From the second half of the 15th century, it served as the seat of Varzuzhskaya Volost (which was abolished in 1841).
The volost was abolished on , 1841, when volosts of Arkhangelsk Governorate's uyezds were enlarged. Umbskaya Volost, along with Varzuzhskaya Volost and the territory of the Terskaya Lapps, became a part of new Kuzomenskaya Volost.
1828 saw more changes—Knyazhegubskaya Volost was merged into Kandalakshskaya Volost; Chernoretskoye usolye was merged into Kovdskaya Volost, Tetrinskaya slobodka and Pyalitskaya slobodka, along with Ponoy, were merged into Varzuzhskaya Volost, and Poryegubskaya Volost was merged into Umbskaya Volost.
In the 16th century, most of the Kola Peninsula's territory was under the administration of Kolsky Uyezd. Umbskaya and Varzuzhskaya Volosts were the only territories of the peninsula which were a part of Dvinsky Uyezd.
Varzuzhskaya Volost () was an administrative division (a "volost") of the Novgorod Republic and later of the Grand Duchy of Moscow, Tsardom of Russia, and the Russian Empire. Its seat was in Varzuga.
In the 16th century, most of the Kola Peninsula's territory was under the administration of Kolsky Uyezd. Varzuzhskaya and Umbskaya Volosts were the only territories of the peninsula which were a part of Dvinsky Uyezd.
The volost was abolished on , 1841, when volosts of Arkhangelsk Governorate's uyezds were enlarged. Varzuzhskaya Volost, along with Umbskaya Volost and the territory of the Terskaya Lapps, became a part of new Kuzomenskaya Volost.
On , 1841, all volosts in the uyezds of Arkhangelsk Governorate were enlarged. In Kolsky Uyezd, only two volosts remained—Kovdskaya, which included old Keretskaya and Kandalakshskaya Volosts and all of the pogosts; and Kuzomenskaya, which was formed from Varzuzhskaya and Umbskaya Volosts and the territory of the Terskaya Lapps).
In 1784, when Arkhangelsk Oblast of Vologda Viceroyalty was transformed into Arkhangelsk Viceroyalty, Varzuzhskaya Volost was transferred under the jurisdiction of the new viceroyalty's Kolsky Uyezd. When the viceroyalty was transformed into Arkhangelsk Governorate in 1796, the volost's jurisdiction again changed accordingly.
From the time of its foundation, the uyezd was governed directly from Moscow. This changed on , 1708, when Tsar Peter the Great divided the country into eight governorates, and Kolsky and Dvinsky Uyezds became a part of Archangelgorod Governorate. When Archangelgorod Governorate was abolished by Catherine II on 1780, Kolsky Uyezd became a part of Arkhangelsk Oblast of Vologda Viceroyalty. When Arkhangelsk Oblast was re-organized into Arkhangelsk Viceroyalty by Catherine II's decree on , 1784, Kolsky Uyezd became a part of it as well. The borders of the uyezd were also changed—Varzuzhskaya and Umbskaya Volosts were transferred under its jurisdiction, while most territories in northern Karelia were transferred into Kemsky Uyezd.
At first, Sweden extracted the Kola Peninsula from both Russia and Denmark–Norway in a series of wars and resulting treaties. However, in the later Treaty of Täysinä in 1595, Sweden acknowledged Russian rights in Kola. Claims from Denmark–Norway remained, and therefore in 1582, a Russian voivode was appointed to Kola to provide for better defenses of the peninsula. The voivode governed the territory which became known as Kolsky Uyezd. Upon its creation, the uyezd covered most of the territory of the Kola Peninsula, with the exception of Varzuzhskaya and Umbskaya Volosts (which were a part of Dvinsky Uyezd), and also the northern part of Karelia all the way to Lendery.
In the second half of the 16th century, King Frederick II of Denmark–Norway demanded that the Tsardom of Russia cede the peninsula. Russia declined, and in order to organize adequate defenses established the position of a "voyevoda". The "voyevoda" sat in Kola, which became the administrative center of the region. Prior to that, the administrative duties were performed by the tax collectors from Kandalaksha. Newly established Kolsky Uyezd covered most of the territory of the peninsula (with the exception of Varzuzhskaya and Umbskaya Volosts, which were a part of Dvinsky Uyezd), as well as the northern part of Karelia all the way to Lendery.
In the 15th century, Novgorodians started to establish permanent settlements on the Kola Peninsula. Administratively, this territory was divided into Varzuzhskaya and Umbskaya Volosts, which were governed by a posadnik from the area of the Northern Dvina. The Novgorod Republic lost control of both of these "volosts" to the Grand Duchy of Moscow after the Battle of Shelon in 1471, and the republic itself ceased to exist in 1478 when Ivan III took the city of Novgorod. All Novgorod territories, including those on the Kola Peninsula, became a part of the Grand Duchy of Moscow.
In the 15th century, Novgorodians started to establish permanent settlements on the peninsula. Umba and Varzuga, the first documented permanent settlements of the Novgorodians, date back to 1466. Over time, all coastal areas to the west of the Pyalitsa River had been settled, creating a territory where the population was mostly Novgorodian. Administratively, this territory was divided into Varzuzhskaya and Umbskaya Volosts, which were governed by a posadnik from the area of the Northern Dvina. The Novgorod Republic lost control of both of these "volosts" to the Grand Duchy of Moscow after the Battle of Shelon in 1471, and the republic itself ceased to exist in 1478 when Ivan III took the city of Novgorod. All Novgorod territories, including those on the Kola Peninsula, became a part of the Grand Duchy of Moscow.