Synonyms for vilgrain or Related words with vilgrain

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Examples of "vilgrain"
In 1986, Francis Bernard illustrated a Moroccan tale, entitled "La Négresse Lune" in collaboration with Bénédicte Vilgrain. The full-page compositions are in black and in color.
Notable players who at one time were Utica Devils include Martin Brodeur, Bill Guerin, Kevin Todd, Corey Schwab, Bobby Holik, Claude Vilgrain, Valeri Zelepukin, Jason Smith and Jim Dowd. The team's last coach was Robbie Ftorek.
Claude Vilgrain (born March 1, 1963) is a retired Haitian-born Canadian ice hockey right winger. He played in 89 NHL games with the Vancouver Canucks, New Jersey Devils, and Philadelphia Flyers. He played in the 1988 Olympics for Team Canada. He was raised in Quebec City, Quebec.
Despite putting up impressive numbers in the minors, Lenardon never received another NHL shot in two more seasons in the Devils' system, and was dealt to the Vancouver Canucks for Claude Vilgrain at the trade deadline in 1989. Lenardon would get his second NHL stint in the 1989–90 season, appearing in 8 games for the Canucks and scoring a goal.
Jean-Jacques Aeschlimann, Olivier Anken, Mauro Beccarelli, Gaetan Boucher, Gino Cavallini, Chris Chelios, Gilles Dubois, Daniel Dubuis, Normand Dupont, Heinz Ehlers, Rico Fata, Pierre-Alain Flotiront, René Furler, Paul Gagné, Gaston Gingras, Richmond Gosselin, Shawn Heaphy, Barry Jenkins, Ramil Juldashew, Willy Kohler, Jakob Kölliker, Francis Lardon, Steve Latinovitch, Marc Leuenberger, Bob Lindberg, Kevin Lötscher, Urs Lott, Serge Martel, Serge Meyer, Cyrill Pasche, Guido Pfosi, Daniel "Dan" Poulin, Jörg Reber, Michel Riesen, Valeri Schirjajew, Kevin Schläpfer, Björn Schneider, Sven Schmid, Jiri Slegr, Laurent Stehlin, Martin Steinegger, Alexandre Tremblay, Marko Tuomainen, Claude Vilgrain, Marco Wegmüller, Daniel Widmer, Bernhard Wist, Aldo Zenhäusern, Tyler Seguin, Patrick Kane
The contents of the enormous warehouses at Vilgrain, where food rations for the army were stored, were sold at low prices to Parisians. In June 1919, bread rationing finally ended, and the food supply gradually returned to normal. In April, to create jobs for demobilized soldiers, the government decided demolish the Thiers Wall, the ring of fortifications that had been built around the city between 1840 and 1844. There was discussion of turning the wide strip of land into a new park, but instead it was used for the construction of low-cost housing for Parisian workers. Demolition began on May 5, and construction of seven-story public housing units began soon afterwards.