Synonyms for vulvovaginitis or Related words with vulvovaginitis

urethritis              trichomoniasis              vaginitis              tonsillitis              candidosis              faciale              gonorrhea              herpeticum              impetigo              neurodermatitis              pharyngitis              lepra              tracheitis              ecthyma              salpingitis              sialadenitis              vaginosis              candidiasis              otomycosis              verrucae              endomyometritis              intertrigo              erysipeloid              shigellosis              tuberculoid              gonorrhoea              abacterial              actinomycosis              paronychias              sporotrichosis              tuberculous              neonatorum              dermatophytosis              mycetoma              erysipelas              gonorrheal              dermatomycosis              papillomata              mycoses              hydradenitis              mycobacteriosis              anisakiasis              hidradentitis              endometritis              vulvovaginal              dermatophilosis              vulvodynia              tympanitis              subitum              fungemia             



Examples of "vulvovaginitis"
Infectious vulvovaginitis can be caused by group A beta-hemolytic "Streptococcus" (7–20% of cases), "Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella, Yersinia", or common STI organisms ("Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis", herpes simplex virus, and human papillomavirus)"." Symptoms and treatment of infectious vulvovaginitis vary depending on the organism causing it. "Shigella" infections of the reproductive tract usually coexist with infectious of the gastrointestinal tract and cause mucous, purulent discharge. They are treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. "Streptococcus" infections cause similar symptoms to nonspecific vulvovaginitis and are treated with amoxicillin. STI-associated vulvovaginitis may be caused by sexual abuse or vertical transmission, and are treated and diagnosed like adult infections.
Infectious vulvovaginitis can be caused by group A beta-hemolytic "Streptococcus" (7-20% of cases), "Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella, Yersinia", or common STI organisms ("Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis", herpes simplex virus, and human papillomavirus)"." Symptoms and treatment of infectious vulvovaginitis vary depending on the organism causing it. "Shigella" infections of the reproductive tract usually coexist with infectious of the gastrointestinal tract and cause mucous, purulent discharge. They are treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. "Streptococcus" infections cause similar symptoms to nonspecific vulvovaginitis and are treated with amoxicillin. STI-associated vulvovaginitis may be caused by sexual abuse or vertical transmission, and are treated and diagnosed like adult infections.
In pregnancy, changes in the levels of female sex hormones, such as estrogen, make a woman more likely to develop candidal vulvovaginitis. During pregnancy, the "Candida" fungus is more prevalent (common), and recurrent infection is also more likely. There is no clear evidence that treatment of asymptomatic candidal vulvovaginitis in pregnancy reduces the risk of preterm birth. Candidal vulvovaginitis in pregnancy should be treated with intravaginal clotrimazole or nystatin for at least 7 days.
Vulvovaginitis in children may be "nonspecific", or caused by irritation with no known infectious cause, or infectious, caused by a pathogenic organism. Nonspecific vulvovaginitis may be triggered by fecal contamination, sexual abuse, chronic diseases, foreign bodies, nonestrogenized epithelium, chemical irritants, eczema, seborrhea, or immunodeficiency. It is treated with topical steroids; antibiotics may be given in cases where itching has resulted in a secondary infection.
Other side effects of gliflozins include increased risk of urinary tract infections, candidal vulvovaginitis and low blood sugar (hypoglycemia).
Urogenital tract amoebiasis derived from intestinal lesion can cause amoebic vulvovaginitis "(May's disease)", rectovesicle fistula and rectovaginal fistula.
Vulvovaginitis in children may be "nonspecific", or caused by irritation with no known infectious cause, or infectious, caused by a pathogenic organism. Nonspecific vulvovaginitis may be triggered by fecal contamination, sexual abuse, chronic diseases, foreign bodies, nonestrogenized epithelium, chemical irritants, eczema, seborrhea, or immunodeficiency. It is treated with topical steroids; antibiotics may be given in cases where itching has resulted in a secondary infection.
When there are more than four recurrent episodes of candidal vulvovaginitis per year, a longer initial treatment course is recommended, such as orally administered fluconazole followed by a second and third dose 3 and 6 days later, respectively.
For infrequent recurrences, the simplest and most cost-effective management is self-diagnosis and early initiation of topical therapy. However, women whose condition has previously been diagnosed with candidal vulvovaginitis are not necessarily more likely to be able to diagnose themselves; therefore, any woman whose symptoms persist after using an over the counter preparation, or who has a recurrence of symptoms within 2 months, should be evaluated with office-based testing. Unnecessary or inappropriate use of topical preparations is common and can lead to a delay in the treatment of other causes of vulvovaginitis, which can result in worse outcomes.
Infection is normally sub-clinical but can cause reproductive disease in cattle such as endometritis, vulvovaginitis and mastitis. Transmission is both vertical and horizontal. It can also be indirectly spread by fomites. Distribution is worldwide and the virus infects a range of ruminants, including bison, buffalo, sheep and goats.
Short-course topical formulations (i.e., single dose and regimens of 1–3 days) effectively treat uncomplicated candidal vulvovaginitis. The topically applied azole drugs are more effective than nystatin. Treatment with azoles results in relief of symptoms and negative cultures in 80–90% of patients who complete therapy.
The genital disease causes infectious pustular vulvovaginitis in cows and infectious balanoposthitis in bulls. Symptoms include fever, depression, loss of appetite, painful urination, a swollen vulva with pustules, ulcers, vesicles and erosions in cows, and pain on sexual contact in bulls. In both cases lesions usually resolve within two weeks.
Vaginitis, also known as vaginal infection and vulvovaginitis, is an inflammation of the vagina and possible vulva. It can result in discharge, itching and pain, and is often associated with an irritation or infection of the vulva. Infected women may also be asymptomatic.
In pregnancy, higher levels of estrogen make a woman more likely to develop a yeast infection. During pregnancy, the "Candida" fungus is more common, and recurrent infection is also more likely. There is no clear evidence that treatment of asymptomatic candidal vulvovaginitis in pregnancy reduces the risk of preterm birth.
Other treatments after more than four episodes per year, may include ten days of either oral or topical treatment followed by fluconazole orally once per week for 6 months. About 10-15% of recurrent candidal vulvovaginitis cases are due to non-"Candida albicans" species. Non-"albicans" species tend to have higher levels of resistance to fluconazole. Therefore, recurrence or persistence of symptoms while on treatment indicates speciation and antifungal resistance tests to tailor antifungal treatment.
Vaginal yeast infection, also known as candidal vulvovaginitis and vaginal thrush, is excessive growth of yeast in the vagina that results in irritation. The most common symptom is vaginal itching, which may be severe. Other symptoms include burning with urination, white and thick vaginal discharge that typically does not smell bad, pain with sex, and redness around the vagina. Symptoms often worsen just before a woman's period.
SGLT2 inhibitors are called gliflozins and lead to a reduction in blood glucose levels. Therefore, SGLT2 inhibitors have potential use in the treatment of type II diabetes. As studied on canagliflozin, a member of this class of drugs, gliflozins enhance glycemic control as well as reduce body weight and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The gliflozins canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin may lead to euglycemic ketoacidosis. Other side effects of gliflozins include increased risk of (generally mild) urinary tract infections, candidal vulvovaginitis.
Vaginal bleeding not associated with menarche may be cause for concern in a child. In the first few days of life, some amount of vaginal bleeding is normal, prompted by the drop in transplacental hormones. Causes of vaginal bleeding in children include trauma, condyloma acuminata, lichen sclerosus, vulvovaginitis, tumors, urethral prolapse, precocious puberty, exogenous hormone exposure, and retained foreign body. Most causes can be diagnosed with a visual examination of the vulva and a careful medical history, but some may require vaginoscopy or a speculum exam.
Alphaherpesvirinae is a subfamily of Herpesviridae, primarily distinguished by reproducing more quickly than other subfamilies of Herpesviridae. In animal virology the most important herpesviruses belong to the Alphaherpesvirinae. Pseudorabies virus is the causative agent of Aujeszky's disease in pigs and bovine herpesvirus 1 is the causative agent of bovine infectious rhinotracheitis and pustular vulvovaginitis. Mammals serve as natural hosts. There are currently 37 species in this subfamily, divided among 5 genera. Diseases associated with this subfamily include: HHV-1 and HHV-2: skin vesicles or mucosal ulcers, rarely encephalitis and meningitis HHV-3: chickenpox (varicella) and shingles gaHV-2: Marek's disease.
In animal virology, the most important herpesviruses belong to the subfamily "Alphaherpesvirinae". Research on pseudorabies virus (PrV), the causative agent of Aujeszky's disease in pigs, has pioneered animal disease control with genetically modified vaccines. PrV is now extensively studied as a model for basic processes during lytic herpesvirus infection, and for unraveling molecular mechanisms of herpesvirus neurotropism, whereas bovine herpesvirus 1, the causative agent of bovine infectious rhinotracheitis and pustular vulvovaginitis, is analyzed to elucidate molecular mechanisms of latency. The avian infectious laryngotracheitis virus is phylogenetically distant from these two viruses and serves to underline similarity and diversity within the "Alphaherpesvirinae".