Synonyms for watcom or Related words with watcom

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Examples of "watcom"
Watcom C/C++ (currently Open Watcom C/C++) is a compiler for C, C++ and Fortran. It was developed by Watcom International Corporation.
Watcom developed Watcom C and several other successful products until it was acquired by Powersoft, in 1994, for $100 million.
Though no longer sold commercially by Sybase, the Watcom C/C++ compiler and the Watcom Fortran compiler have been made available free of charge – for non commercial usage, as the "Open Watcom" package.
In 1992, Watcom began a move into the client-server arena with the introduction of Watcom SQL, a SQL database server product. Being a very small company (about 8 developers) they managed to produce high quality software, famous among software developers. Watcom SQL is still in production, now under the name "Sybase SQL Anywhere".
McPhee became an executive at Sybase when it acquired Watcom.
Open Watcom Assembler or WASM is an x86 assembler produced by Watcom and included as part of the Watcom C/C++ compiler. Further development is being done on the 32- and 64-bit JWASM project. which more closely matches the syntax of Microsoft's assembler.
Watcom International Corporation was founded in 1981 by three former employees of the Computer Systems Group (Fred Crigger, Ian McPhee, and Jack Schueler) at the University of Waterloo, in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Watcom produced a variety of tools, including the well-known Watcom C/C++ compiler introduced in 1988.
The "Open Watcom Wiki" has a comprehensive history.
The Sybase Open Watcom Public Licence is a software license that has been approved by the Open Source Initiative. It is the licence under which the Open Watcom C/C++ compiler is released.
Watcom SQL is a (discontinued, in the version under that name) relational database for PC platforms released by Watcom in 1992. It was renamed to SQL Anywhere Studio after Watcom joined Powersoft which was subsequently acquired by Sybase (and later SAP).
In the mid 1980s Watcom developed compilers for the Unisys ICON computers running the QNX operating system. The Watcom C/C++ compiler with QNX developed a market for embedded applications.
XOSL-OW is an Open Watcom Port of XOSL. XOSL is developed by Geurt Vos using the Borland C++ 3.1 tool set while XOSL-OW is based on the Open Watcom version 1.8 tool set.
Waterloo BASIC programming language was one of the earliest Watcom products and predates the existence of the company. During 1978 to 1979 Waterloo BASIC was developed targeting the IBM Series/1. In 1979 the system was ported to VM/CMS running on the IBM 370, 3030, and 4300 computers and an agreement was reached with IBM to market the compiler. Between 1980 and 1983 updated versions were released including ports to the MVS/TSO and VM/CMS. In addition to Waterloo BASIC some of the other early products included WATCOM APL, WATCOM GKS, WATCOM COBOL, WATCOM FORTRAN (WATFIV and WATFOR-77), WATCOM Pascal and the Waterloo 6809 Assembler. These were the basis and provided with the Commodore SuperPET.
stdcall is the standard calling convention for the Microsoft Win32 API and for Open Watcom C++.
In the early 1980s, Watcom Pascal was developed, also for the IBM System 370.
Watcom International Corporation was founded in 1981 in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Watcom produced a variety of tools, including the well-known Watcom C compiler introduced in 1988. In 1994 Powersoft acquired Watcom, merging with Sybase just one year later. In 2000 Sybase spun off their mobile and embedded computing division into its own company, Sybase iAnywhere. iAnywhere played an important role in Sybase’s Unwired Enterprise strategy, which focuses on managing and mobilizing information from the data center to the point of action. In 2010 Sybase was acquired by SAP and is now known as Sybase, an SAP Company.
Watcom was acquired by Powersoft in 1994, and Powersoft merged with Sybase in 1995. In May 2000, Sybase spun off their mobile and embedded computing division into its own company, Sybase iAnywhere (formerly iAnywhere Solutions Inc.). Sybase tried to re-target the Watcom compiler into a visual RAD tool, "Optima++", but in 2003, because the product competed directly with the Sybase offering PowerBuilder, the product was discontinued. Its sister product, Optima-J was continued. In 2003, the Watcom C/C++ and Fortran compilers were released as an open source project under a new name, Open Watcom.
Novell's Netware386 and Fox Software's FoxPro 2 were compiled with Watcom C/C++.
Variadic functions fall back to the Watcom stack based calling convention.
The XOSL-OW Open Watcom Port allows for future development of XOSL using an Open Source development tool set.