Synonyms for wlgi or Related words with wlgi

lifetalk              dabanga              wbai              zamaneh              kpfk              chrw              kzzr              funemployment              arvyla              wxcu              northsound              foorti              wsgn              xegnk              wlra              rustymike              somaliweyn              indexovo              ciut              wwrl              kunm              chiwalaki              idobi              kgnu              lonene              wemu              cjsr              munghana              kccv              maryja              kchung              weup              kusc              ckuw              bookbits              klky              wkrs              courtoisie              wksu              ckua              wlir              kezs              kmpc              wlre              wqxr              kbll              bailrigg              wrhu              cfuv              kbmk             



Examples of "wlgi"
Since retiring from broadcasting as a professional career she has traveled, given talks, and worked part-time at Bahá'í Radio, WLGI, in South Carolina including interviews of Bahá'ís for broadcast. She was interviewed on the radio program and podcast series "A Bahá'í Perspective" as well as contributing to its body of work reviewing authors of books at the library at the Louis Gregory Institute.
WLGI, known as "Radio Bahá'í", is licensed to Hemingway, South Carolina, and broadcasts at 90.9 FM. The station broadcasts a variety of programming, both religious and secular, targeting mostly African-Americans. It is a college radio station, licensed by the FCC for noncommercial Class C operation, and operated by the Louis G. Gregory Bahá'í Institute, named after Hand of the Cause Louis George Gregory, a prominent African-American Bahá'í.
This was Shoghi Effendi's first round of appointees as having achieved a distinguished rank in service to the religion named Hands of the Cause. Memorial observances of his death were among the first events of the newly arrived Bahá'ís and first converts in Uganda from which Enoch Olinga, the "father of victories", would appear in just two years. Bahá'í radio station WLGI is named after Gregory: the "Louis Gregory Institute".
In January 1983 a presidential decree allocated a medium-wave radio frequency band to the National Spiritual Assembly of Bolivia for Caracollo, near Oruro, to become 'Radio Baha'i of Bolivia'. Construction of the new AM 1 kW. station and its associated teaching institute were scheduled for completion in January 1984 and for inauguration at Naw-Ruz, the Bahá'í new year, the same year WLGI came online in the US. The radio station covered a region in Bolivia and Peru of over 400 assemblies. Its call letters are CP-220. The station used alternative energy systems as well as an appropriate technology setup which allowed its relative low power output to rival the effectiveness of stations with more raw broadcasting power. Its call letters are CP220 and it is still on the air.
Since the 1960s there has been interest in mass media to promote and support development projects. This was followed by a view that the service of the community was through the participation of the community and spread of information. A series of UNESCO conferences lead to advancing the issues until in 1978 a conference was held in Ecuador. At that conference researchers summarized developments along these lines and noted challenges such projects faced and a few ways such projects failed while also noting that village radio stations seemed to be a nice fit because of the necessary quality of communication in a society. The Bahá'í Radio project in Ecuador served as a means to study the process of the two trends by setting up a community radio station of the community for the community - and may have been the first such project in all Latin America aimed at serving the "campesinos" as its primary purpose with development oriented programming. It mixed national music forms with public service features (lost and found, messages to individuals, official communications, but looking to develop more.) The project was studied through faculty from Northwestern University from 1980–1982, and briefly in 1983, and reviewed Bahá'í Radio projects in Peru and Bolivia as well and resulted in a PhD by Kurt John Hein in 1985 following which he took up service at WLGI Radio Bahá'í.
Since 1977 the international Bahá'í community has established several radio stations worldwide, particularly in the Americas. Programmes may include local news, music, topics related to socio-economic and community development, educational programmes focusing on indigenous language and culture, and Bahá'í introductory and deepening material. A project studied these radio stations through faculty from Northwestern University from 1980–1982, and briefly in 1983, and reviewed Bahá'í Radio projects in Peru and Bolivia as well and resulted in a PhD by Kurt John Hein in 1985 following which he took up service at WLGI Radio Bahá'í. A Bahá'í radio station was established in Peru to nurture and preserve the local culture by featuring local story-tellers and music recorded at station-sponsored annual indigenous music festivals. With regular feedback from experienced institutions operating out of the Bahá'í World Centre progress was maintained in developments of the radio stations in communication with the Audio-Visual Department at the Bahá'í administrative offices. In 1980 almost the entire staff of the radio station in Ecuador traveled to Peru to make extensive presentations to the international Bahá'í media conference in Puno where the second Bahá'í Radio station would be set up. Staff for projects in Bolivia, Chile and Peru participated in successive training and Ecuadoran staff traveled to Peru and Bolivia to assist in those projects. In the feedback it was highlighted that:
Since the 1960s there has been interest in mass media to promote and support development projects. This was followed by a view that the service of the community of the religion was through the participation of the community and spread of information. At a series of UNESCO conferences Bahá'ís consulted and the consensus of opinion lead to advancing the issues until in 1978 a conference was held in Ecuador. At that conference researchers summarized developments along these lines and noted challenges such projects faced and a few ways such projects failed while also noting that village radio stations seemed to be a nice fit because of the necessary quality of communication in a society. The Bahá'í Radio project in Ecuador served as a means to study the process of the two trends by setting up a community radio station of the community for the community - and may have been the first such project in all Latin America aimed at serving the "campesinos" as its primary purpose with development oriented programming. It mixed national music forms with public service features (lost and found, messages to individuals, official communications, but looking to develop more.) The project was studied through faculty from Northwestern University from 1980–1982, and briefly in 1983, and reviewed Bahá'í Radio projects in Peru and Bolivia as well and resulted in a PhD by Kurt John Hein in 1985 following which he took up service at WLGI Radio Bahá'í.
The Bahá'í Faith in South Carolina begins in the transition but defines another approach to the problem, and proceeded according to its teachings. The first mention in relation to the history of the religion came in the 1860s in a newspaper article. Following this the first individual from South Carolina to find the religion was Louis Gregory in 1909, followed by individuals inside the state. Communities of Bahá'ís were soon operating in North Augusta, Columbia and Greenville struggled with segregation culture through the 1950s externally and internally. However, in the 1969-1973 period, a very remarkable and somewhat unsustainable period of conversions to the religion on the basis of a meeting of Christian and Bahá'í religious ideas established a basis of community across several counties - notably Marion, Williamsburg, and Dillon, served by the Louis Gregory Institute and its radio station WLGI but also across the wider area. That community continues and has gathered news coverage as part of the second largest religion in South Carolina.
The Bahá'í Faith in South Carolina begins in the transition from but defines another approach to the problem, and proceeded according to its teachings. The first mention in relation to the history of the religion came in the 1860s in a newspaper article. Following this the first individual from South Carolina to find the religion was Louis Gregory in 1909, followed by individuals inside the state. Communities of Bahá'ís were soon operating in North Augusta, Columbia and Greenville struggled with segregation culture through the 1950s externally and internally. However, in the 1969-1973 period, a very remarkable and somewhat unsustainable period of conversions to the religion on the basis of a meeting of Christian and Bahá'í religious ideas established a basis of community across several counties - notably Marion, Williamsburg, and Dillon, served by the Louis Gregory Institute and its radio station WLGI but also across the wider area. That community continues and has gathered news coverage as part of the second largest religion in South Carolina.