Synonyms for wu_zuguang or Related words with wu_zuguang

xin_fengxia              dong_xiaowan              pijiang              xiuhui              fengying              zhuo_wenjun              李香君              yuanxiu              zhenfei              chunhe              qichang              meng_renzan              empress_kezuhun              tingxian              卞玉京              guan_daosheng              bocheng              zhiliu              zhang_shizhao              empress_shangguan              shanzuo              wen_yiduo              zongyu              sun_weishi              朱弘桓              严丙量              guo_nüwang              empress_huyan              feifan              minghao              jin_youzhi              nalan_xingde              honghuan              runqi              蔡共侯              wei_baoheng              yuexia              chengxiu              liu_rushi              ziheng              linawang              張國立              guxiang              li_quanlüe              chaopanliu              zaifu              wang_shimin              zongying              yuanheng              caidie             



Examples of "wu_zuguang"
Xin Fengxia and Wu Zuguang had three children. Their son, Wu Huan, is also a writer, painter, and calligrapher. After the deaths of Xin in 1998 and of Wu Zuguang in 2003, he organized the exhibition "A Hundred Years of the Wu Family" at the Poly Art Museum in Beijing. It was also shown in France, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.
Wu Zuguang and Xin Fengxia had three children. Their son Wu Huan is also a writer, painter, and calligrapher. After the deaths of Wu Zuguang, he organized the exhibition "A Hundred Years of the Wu Family" at the Poly Art Museum in Beijing. It was also held in France, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.
Wu Zuguang, an outspoken critic of government cultural policies, was denounced in 1957 as a "rightist" in Mao Zedong's Anti-Rightist Movement, and was sent to the Great Northern Wilderness in Heilongjiang to be "reformed through labour." Xin was pressured to divorce her husband, but refused. Citing a legendary love story from one of her operas, she said "Wang Baochuan waited 18 years for Xue Pinggui, and I will wait 28 years for Wu Zuguang." As a result, she was herself labeled a rightist and went through struggle sessions.
In 1941, Chen arrived in Chongqing, China's wartime capital, where he joined the China Film Studio and the Central Cinematography Studio run by the Nationalist government. However, he mainly worked in theatre, directing plays written by Wu Zuguang, Xia Yan, and Chen Baichen. His most impressive wartime contribution was the staging of "Qu Yuan", a famous 1942 play by Guo Moruo. In 1942, he also published "Rules of Cinema", which is considered the first comprehensive Chinese book on film theory.
Wu Zuguang (; 21 April 1917 – 9 April 2003) was a Chinese playwright, film director and social critic who has been called a "legendary figure in Chinese art and literary circles". He authored more than 40 plays and film scripts, including the patriotic drama "City of Phoenix", one of the most influential plays during the Second Sino-Japanese War, and "Return on a Snowy Night", which is generally considered his masterpiece. He directed "The Soul of the Nation", Hong Kong's first colour film, based on his own historical drama "Song of Righteousness".
Wu returned to Beijing after three years of hard labour, but six years later, China fell into the even greater turmoil of the Cultural Revolution, which began in 1966. Xin Fengxia and Wu Zuguang were both denounced at the beginning of the period. She was severely beaten by a junior actor of the China Pingju Institute; her left knee was broken and she never fully recovered from the injury. The couple's friend Lao She drowned himself after being similarly tortured. After her beating Xin served seven years of forced labour. In December 1975, she became paralyzed after suffering a stroke. Wu took care of her for the rest of her life.
Wu returned to Beijing after three years of hard labour, but six years later, China fell into the even greater turmoil of the Cultural Revolution, which began in 1966. Xin Fengxia and Wu Zuguang were both denounced at the beginning of the period. She became disabled below her left knee after a severe beating. Their friend Lao She drowned himself after being similarly tortured. During the tumultuous decade Wu and Xin both served years of forced labour. In December 1975, she became paralyzed after suffering a stroke, and Wu took care of her for the rest of her life.
In 1951, Lao She introduced Xin Fengxia to the famous playwright Wu Zuguang. Like many intellectuals at the time, Wu held high hopes for the new People's Republic and returned to China from British Hong Kong. Xin, who had acted in one of Wu's plays, admired his talent. They married that year, despite the fact that they were from differing socioeconomic backgrounds; she had no formal education and was nearly illiterate, while he was from a prominent family of scholars. Wu helped her to study reading, writing, and calligraphy. She also studied painting with Qi Baishi, one of the most celebrated masters of Chinese painting, who took her as his goddaughter.
Wu was born on 21 April 1917 to a prominent scholar-official family in Beijing, with ancestral roots in Changzhou, Jiangsu Province. His grandfather Wu Zhiying () was a "muliao" of the Qing dynasty reformer Zhang Zhidong and participated in the Xinhai Revolution. His father Wu Ying (吴瀛) was a founder and curator of the Beijing Palace Museum. His mother Zhou Qinqi (周琴绮) gave birth to 15 children, 11 of whom (four sons and seven daughters) survived to adulthood. She gave birth to Wu Zuguang, her first child, in the mansion of Wu Ying's uncle Zhuang Yunkuan, a minister of the Republic of China government.
Xin was married to Wu Zuguang, a prominent playwright and an outspoken critic of government policies. When Wu was denounced as a "rightist" in Mao Zedong's Anti-Rightist Movement, Xin refused to divorce him and was herself denounced as a result. She was later severely persecuted during the Cultural Revolution, becoming disabled after a beating and was later paralyzed due to a stroke. No longer able to perform, she dedicated the remainder of her life to teaching, writing, and painting. She studied painting with her godfather Qi Baishi, a master of Chinese painting, and studied writing with her husband. She published a two-million-word memoir, which has been translated into English and Urdu.
Despite the expansion of the group, many Chinese intellectuals had kept away from the movement, as they did with the Democracy Wall movement in the late 1970s. One exception was Wu Zuguang, who advocated a reversal of the governments position at a meeting of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference in 1997, and he did not suffer any repercussions for his comments because of his age. Other members of the group included prominent student Jiang Qisheng, a graduate of the Beijing Institute of Aeronautics who became head of the Beijing Student Autonomous Federation which acted in conjunction with other universities and formed part of a delegation that met with Premier Li Peng to try and resolve the Tiananmen protests peacefully. He was jailed for 18 months and upon his release in February 1991, was denied regular employment.
During Mao Zedong's Anti-Rightist Movement, Wu was denounced as a "rightist" in 1957 and sent to the Great Northern Wilderness in Heilongjiang to be "reformed through labour." His crime was to criticize the Communist Party's control of the theatre and to argue that the "neihang" (experts) should have a greater role in such matters. He was called an enemy of the Party, even by his renowned colleague Tian Han. Tian later referenced Wu's work approvingly, which is seen by some as an implicit apology, and was himself persecuted to death. Xin Fengxia was pressured to divorce him, but refused. Citing a legendary love story from one of her operas, she said "Wang Baochuan waited 18 years for Xue Pinggui, and I will wait 28 years for Wu Zuguang." As a result, she was herself labeled a rightist and went through struggle sessions.