Synonyms for yugarabul or Related words with yugarabul

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Examples of "yugarabul"
The origin of the suburb name is from the Yugarabul Aboriginal language meaning place of carpet snake which is located south of the original Caboolture township.
The name of Capalaba is believed to be derived from the Indigenous Yugarabul word for the ringtail possum, a marsupial native to the area.
The origin of the suburb name is from the Yugarabul Aboriginal language meaning place of the stone axe. It was initially written as Bundumba, then Bundanba, and then on 30 January 1932, the name was officially standardised as Bundamba.
The name "Mutdapilly" is believed to be a combination word from the Yuggera language (Yugarabul dialect) where "mudtherri" means "sticky" or "muddy" and "pilly" means "gully". The name was give by Captain Patrick Logan on 9 June 1827.
Dakabin is a locality in Moreton Bay Region, Queensland, Australia. It is north of Brisbane CBD. The origin of the suburb name is from the Yugarabul Aboriginal language meaning grass tree or grass root. The western boundary is aligned with the North Coast railway line while the eastern boundary follows the Bruce Highway.
The Kabi indigenous people are the traditional custodians of the area now known as Caboolture. The name "Kabultur" is derived from the Yugarabul dialect meaning "place of the carpet snake". The Kabi people harvested bush food, fresh water mussels, oysters, fish, and some game animals, moving around the land to take best advantage of seasonally-available produce.
It is recorded that the Turrbul people, who long inhabited the seashore, the creeks and lagoons, in what we know as the locality of Nudgee Beach to the Pine River, were a branch of the clan of the Yugarabul speaking people. This larger clan inhabited the area from North Brisbane and along the coastline of Nudgee, Sandgate to Caboolture.
Before European settlement, the Brisbane River was spiritually important and a vital food source for the Aboriginal people of the Turrbal nation, primarily through fishing in the tidal sections downstream, with fishing and firestick farming in the upper reaches where there was freshwater, depending on the season. The language group common to most of the area was the Yugarabul language group.
The Kabi indigenous people are the traditional custodians of the Caboolture River catchment area. The name "Kabultur" is derived from the Yugarabul dialect meaning "place of the carpet snake". The Kabi people harvested bush food, fresh water mussels, oysters, fish, and some game animals, moving around the land to take best advantage of seasonally-available produce.
Plebidonax deltoides (previously "Donax deltoides") is a small, edible saltwater clam or marine bivalve mollusc of the family Donacidae, endemic to Australia. It is most widely known as the pipi in the eastern states of its native Australia, and as the Goolwa cockle or Coorong cockle in South Australia; in south-eastern Queensland, it is often also known as eugarie or (y)ugari, a borrowing from the local Yugarabul language.
The Murri are the Indigenous Australians of modern-day Queensland, North West New South Wales. Collections of tribes and extended family groups throughout geographic regions of Australia have different names, such as the Yugarabul, the Jagera peoples from Coorparoo, Kwiambal peoples from Northern New South Wales and the Koori people of parts of New South Wales and Victoria. The term is their preferred term, expressing pride in their heritage and race.
In 1905, Mr Lumley Hill, the proprietor of Bellevue Station suggested the name ‘Coominya’ for the rail siding. Indigenuous Yugarabul dialect was probably spoken in the district and ‘Coominya’ a derivation of this dialect. According to Mr Lumley Hill it meant ‘I see water’. However, as most of the visible water around Coominya is formed in man-made landscapes it has been suggested that swamps towards Clarendon may have been the water spoken of. There is a natural swampy area south of Coominya which may be the area referred to in the records.
The town was originally called Wallu, but was changed to Tin Can Bay in 1937. The origins of "Tin Can" are uncertain, but is believed to be derived from an indigenous name, possibly "tinchin" meaning "mangrove" in the Yugarabul dialect of the Yuggera language, or tinken meaning vine with large ribbed leaves from Doombarah Clan, Dulinbara dialect, Kabi language, or Tuncanbar, thought to refer to the dugongs that frequent the inlet. European settlement began in the 1870s as the point where logs would be floated to the timber mills at Maryborough. Tin Can Bay later became, and still remains, an important fishing port, with a focus on prawns as well as recreational fishing.