Synonyms for yujian or Related words with yujian

chenhao              yueqi              fuzhi              jiafu              qifeng              shugui              dezhi              guowei              juezai              zongxun              qiuying              zhizhong              weixing              zhixing              youyu              yijun              zhifan              yuanchong              guangqian              jingyu              hongzhu              weicheng              yitang              youliang              xiaofu              jianfeng              ziliang              renliang              qinggang              qingge              chengliang              ziqin              yunpeng              xiuzhi              guozhang              gongquan              shengkun              zizhou              baorong              zhihui              yanming              boxiong              jinguang              zhimin              yunshan              pengkai              fakui              zhensheng              xueying              zhongyun             



Examples of "yujian"
At the same time, Zhu Yujian has enthroned as Longwu Emperor and Ju Shisi ordered his men to congratulate and requested to Zhu Yujian to seize Zhu Hengjia. After Ding Kuichu () attacked at Wuzhou, Zhu Hengjia escaped to Guilin. Then, he released Ju Shisi, to hope Ju will help him but Ju Shisi captured him. Later, Zhu Hengjia was escorted to Fujian and got killed.
Jade Mirror of the Four Unknowns, Siyuan yujian (), also referred to as Jade Mirror of the Four Origins, is a 1303 mathematical monograph by Yuan dynasty mathematician Zhu Shijie. With this masterpiece, Zhu brought Chinese algebra to its highest level.
Zhu Yujian is said to have had a very close relationship with his wife, who had shared his hardship when he was incarcerated. Contrary to Chinese custom, he steadfastly declined to take any concubines.
According to the "Wudeng Huiyuan" ("Compendium of Five Lamps") Xuefeng Yicun was born in 822 in Nanan in ancient the district Quanzhou (now the province of Fujian). At age twelve he left home to live at Yujian Temple in Putian City.
Things grew quiet for a time until the thirteenth century Renaissance of Chinese math. This saw Chinese mathematicians solving equations with methods Europe would not know until the eighteenth century. The high point of this era came with Zhu Shijie's two books "Suanxue qimeng" and the "Siyuan yujian". In one case he reportedly gave a method equivalent to Gauss's pivotal condensation.
Dr. Little has painted all his adult life. He currently works in a minimalist style strongly influenced by East Asian ink and wash painting, especially works by the 13th century Chan (Zen) painters Muqi and Yujian. His acrylic on canvas painting titled "4.29.09" is in the collection of the Hawaii State Art Museum.
After the fall of Nanjing, two more members of the Ming imperial household created new Southern Ming regimes: one centered in coastal Fujian around the "Longwu Emperor" Zhu Yujian, Prince of Tang—a ninth-generation descendant of Ming founder Zhu Yuanzhang—and one in Zhejiang around "Regent" Zhu Yihai, Prince of Lu. But the two loyalist groups failed to cooperate, making their chances of success even lower than they already were. In July 1646, a new Southern Campaign led by Prince Bolo sent Prince Lu's Zhejiang court into disarray and proceeded to attack the Longwu regime in Fujian. Zhu Yujian was caught and summarily executed in Tingzhou (western Fujian) on 6 October. His adoptive son Koxinga fled to the island of Taiwan with his fleet. Finally in November, the remaining centers of Ming resistance in Jiangxi province fell to the Qing.
After the fall of Nanjing, two more members of the Ming imperial household created new Southern Ming regimes: one centred in coastal Fujian around the "Longwu Emperor" Zhu Yujian – a ninth-generation descendant of the Hongwu Emperor, the Ming dynasty's founder – and one in Zhejiang around "Regent" Zhu Yihai, Prince of Lu. But the two loyalist groups failed to cooperate, making their chances of success even lower than they already were. In July 1646, a new southern campaign led by Bolo sent Prince Lu's Zhejiang court into disarray and proceeded to attack the Longwu regime in Fujian. Zhu Yujian was caught and summarily executed in Tingzhou (western Fujian) on 6 October. His adoptive son Zheng Chenggong fled to the island of Taiwan with his fleet. Finally in November, the remaining centers of Ming resistance in Jiangxi province fell to the Qing.
Erzhu Rong's ancestors were hereditary chiefs of the Qihu (契胡) tribe of Xiongnu extraction, and they used Erzhu as their family name after settling on Erzhu River. Erzhu Rong's great-great-grandfather Erzhu Yujian (爾朱羽健) had assisted Northern Wei's founding emperor Emperor Daowu in his campaigns, and therefore was granted the Xiurong (秀容, in modern Shuozhou, Shanxi) region as the Erzhus' hereditary domain. There, the Erzhus practiced husbandry and became extremely wealthy from the accumulation of livestock.
On May 15, the Army of Qing broke through Nanjing, and the Hongguang regime was destroyed. Zhu Yujian, the clan relative of Ming founded a new court called Longwu at Fuzhou. Meanwhile, Li Zhicheng, the leader of the peasant uprising army jointed with the Ming’s governor He Tengjiao, and fought against the court of Qing. It was impossible to concentrate a large member of stuffs to compiling the "History of Ming" in the unstable political and embattled situation.
Zhu Yujian (; 1602 – 6 October 1646), the Prince of Tang, reigned as the Longwu Emperor of the Southern Ming dynasty from 18 August 1645, when he was enthroned in Fuzhou, to 6 October 1646, when he was captured and executed by a contingent of the Qing army. He was an eighth generation descendant Zhu Jing, Prince Ding of Tang, who was 23rd son of Ming founder Zhu Yuanzhang.
Yujian Zheng (Y.J. Zheng, 郑宇健) is a philosopher studying ethics and comparative Chinese and Western philosophy, with interests in rationality and rational choice theory, philosophy of mind, moral epistemology and psychology, social science and political philosophy. He is an associate professor at Lingnan University (Hong Kong) and writes in both English and Chinese. He also served as a hostel warden in Lingnan University (2007-2008).
He Hui trained vocally at the Conservatory in Xi'an under Professor Rao Yujian (饶余鋻). One of the winners (2nd place) of the Operalia Competition in 2000 and the Verdi Competition in Busseto Voci Verdiane in 2002 (1st place), she began as a mezzo-soprano and made her operatic debut in Shanghai, China in Mozart's Cosi fan tutte as Dorabella. Her first operatic acclaim in Europe came when performing the role of Cio Cio San in Puccini's Madama Butterfly. She was also chosen to sing Cio Cio San in the Italian production of Madama Butterfly which celebrated the centenary of the opera's first performance and which was seen throughout Italy.
Soon after Martini's arrival to China, the Ming capital Beijing fell to Li Zicheng's rebels (April, 1644) and then to the Manchus, and the last legitimate Ming emperor, the Chongzhen Emperor, hanged himself. Down in Zhenjiang, Martini continued working with the short-lived regime of Zhu Yujian, Prince of Tang, who set himself up as the (Southern) Ming Longwu Emperor. Soon enough, the Manchu troops reached Zhejiang. According to Martini's own report (which appeared in some editions of his "De bello tartarico"), the Jesuit was able to switch his allegiance to China's new masters in an easy enough, but bold, way. When Wenzhou, in southern Zhejiang, where Martini happened to be on a mission for Zhu Yujian, was besieged by the Manchus and was about to fall, the Jesuit decorated the house where he was staying with a large red poster with seven characters saying, "Here lives a doctor of the divine Law who has come from the Great West". Under the poster he set up tables with European books, astronomical instruments, etc., surrounding an altar with an image of Jesus. When the Manchu troops arrived, their commander was sufficiently impressed with the display to approach Martini politely and ask if he wished to switch his loyalty to the new Qing Dynasty. Martini agreed, and had his head shaved in the Manchu way, and his Chinese dress and hat replaced with Manchu-style ones. The Manchus then allowed him to return to his Hangzhou church, and provided him and the Hangzhou Christian community with necessary protection.
Meanwhile, the Southern Ming had not been eliminated. When Hangzhou fell to the Qing on 6 July 1645, Prince of Tang Zhu Yujian, a ninth-generation descendant of Ming founder Zhu Yuanzhang managed to escape by land to the southeastern province of Fujian. Crowned as the Longwu Emperor in the coastal city of Fuzhou on 18 August, he depended on the protection of talented seafarer Zheng Zhilong (also known as "Nicholas Iquan"). The childless emperor adopted Zheng's eldest son and granted him the imperial surname. "Koxinga," as this son is known to Westerners, is a distortion of the title "Lord of the Imperial Surname" (Guoxingye 國姓爺). In the mean time another Ming claimant, the Prince of Lu Zhu Yihai, had named himself regent in Zhejiang, but the two loyalist regimes failed to cooperate, making their chances of success even lower than they already were.
In 1644, Zhu Yujian was a ninth-generation descendant of Zhu Yuanzhang who had been put under house arrest in 1636 by the Chongzhen emperor. He was pardoned and restored to his princely title by the Hongguang emperor. When Nanjing fell in June 1645, he was in Suzhou en route to his new fiefdom in Guangxi. When Hangzhou fell on July 6, he retreated up the Qiantang River and proceeded to Fujian from a land route that went through northeastern Jiangxi and mountainous areas in northern Fujian. Protected by General Zheng Hongkui, on July 10 he proclaimed his intention to become regent of the Ming dynasty, a title that he formally received on July 29, a few days after reaching Fuzhou. He was enthroned as emperor on August 18, 1645. Most Nanjing officials had surrendered to the Qing, but some followed the Prince of Tang in his flight to Fuzhou.
Wang was born into peasant family in Shangdong province. He lost his father and elder brother when he was young, and his mother raised him into adulthood. When Sun Yat-Sen opened the Whampoa Military Academy, Wang was working as a shop keeper. He immediately borrowed money from his employer and traveled to the South to join the national revolution. Some of his notable classmates included Du Yuming, Fan Hanjie, Hu Lien, Liu Yujian, Guan Linzheng and Lin Biao. After his graduation he joined the Northern Expedition under Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek against the northern warlords. After Chiang purged the communists in Shanghai on April 12, 1927, he stayed with the Kuomintang as a regiment commander in the National Revolutionary Army. In 1930 he fought in the Central Plains War as a colonel in the central army against an anti-central government coalition under Yan Xishan, Feng Yuxiang and Li Zongren. In 1932, he was received by Chiang Kai-shek after successfully defend his position under communist attacks during the Fourth Encirclement Campaign against Jiangxi Soviet. He was promoted to brigade commander and later as commander of the 51st division. Two years later he participated the Fifth Encirclement Campaign against Jiangxi Soviet and captured Chinese communist leader Fang Zhimin and killing another red army commander in battle around September 1934. In 1935 he scored yet another victory at Jiangxi province by capturing the entire officer corps of the Red Army's 10th corps and was promoted to major general.