Synonyms for yurei or Related words with yurei

gokudo              ibun              obake              sumomomo              moeru              airantou              nagasarete              nekogami              katsugeki              iriya              hikae              driland              zorori              noragami              daisenso              wakusei              touken              enban              shirokuma              papuwa              yaoyorozu              kikoku              yuugi              onmyou              tottemo              hajimemashita              tanteidan              bozu              oshaberi              kuzuryu              taisenki              honpo              zetsubou              nemuri              bunmei              ranbu              torimonocho              nichijou              kaibutsu              ishiki              shisho              sakurano              momomo              daihyakka              mouichido              suzuri              seijin              ouka              ansatsu              yoku             



Examples of "yurei"
This series explores some themes of folk religion such as possession, exorcism, shamanism, yurei, and yokai. In the final episode, some more existential themes are explored.
remains amongst the living as a yurei, or ghost, who must complete an unfinished duty amongst the living or be given a proper ritual to ease its passing into the next world. A yurei is thought to be produced by violent means such as murder or suicide. These tend to take on a fixed desire emotion such as revenge, love, jealousy, hatred, or sorrow while carrying out their hauntings.
In 2016 the line of pedals expanded with the introduction of a new series named Pulse of Rebellion that includes RobotHolic, DarkLight, EchoBandit Gold, EchoBandit Silver, Yurei, Lorion, Matterix.
Yuki (Rina Akiyama) lives with her father Jiro (Yurei Yanagi) and her mother Kayako (Fumie Nakajima) in Tokyo. Their peaceful lives are disturbed when a group of assassins slaughters Kayako and cripples Jiro. Yuki seeks revenge by cladding herself in gothic lolita fashion and killing off the assassins.
Original content produced by AltJapan includes the books "Hello, Please! Very Helpful Super Kawaii Characters from Japan" (Chronicle Books, 2007) and the "Attack!" series, which includes "Yokai Attack! The Japanese Monster Survival Guide" (Kodansha, 2008), "Ninja Attack! True Tales of Assassins, Samurai, and Outlaws" (Kodansha, 2010), and "Yurei Attack! The Japanese Ghost Survival Guide" (Tuttle, 2012).
The game of Hyakumonogatari Kaidankai became a cult phenomenon in Japan, and while the hype of these tales has receded, many J-horror films and Japanese urban legends can be attributed to the parlour game's influence. Woodblock painter and founder of the Maruyama-Shijo School of Painting, Maruyama Okyo is considered the first artist to offer paintings of the "yurei" who were frequently cast in kaidan.
Chinese horror is a term given to Chinese, Hong Kong, and Taiwanese films as part of the stream of Asian horror films. Like Korean and Japanese as well as other Asian horror films many focus on ghosts (yurei is also very common), supernatural environments, and suffering. Perhaps one of the best films for C-horror is "The Eye" directed by the Pang brothers which was later remade.
Onryō (怨霊) is a Japanese ghost ("yurei") who is able to return to the physical world in order to seek vengeance. While male onryō can be found, mainly in kabuki theatre, the majority are women, powerless in the physical world, they often suffer at the capricious whims of their male lovers. In death they become strong. Goryō are vengeance ghosts from the aristocratic classes, especially those who have been martyred.
Infection causes the most damage during seedling stage to maximum tillering stage because during this time interval, the plants are at a higher risk of death. Affected seedlings are stunted in growth with leaves that elongate without unfolding. Their color pales to white with drooped, curled, dead leaves. In Japan, this disease was called "Yurei Byo" (ghost disease) because of these symptoms. If the plants grow, they produce few, if any, tillers and panicles with empty spikelets.
The Kitarō story began life as a kamishibai in 1933, written by Masami Itou (伊藤正美). Itou's version was called Kitarō of the Graveyard (Japanese: ハカバノキタロウ, hepburn: "Hakaba no Kitarō"), and is generally written in katakana to distinguish it from Mizuki's version of the tale. It is said to be a loose reinterpretation of the similar Japanese folktale called the Ame-Kai Yurei ("The Candy-Buying Ghost.") In 1954, Mizuki was asked to continue the series by his publisher.
Throughout Season 2, Lotus would act as the bodyguard to Dario Cuerto both during their absence from the temple, and later when they resurfaced there. On the Season 2 Finale at Ultima Lucha Dos, she competed in her first televised match against El Dragon Azteca Jr. where the match went to a no contest due to Pentagón Dark breaking her arm. On November 16 episode of Lucha Underground during the Aztec Warfare III she returned to the temple along with The Black Lotus Triad members Hitokiri, Doku and Yurei and all four attacked Pentagón Dark, allowing Johnny Mundo to eliminate him, thus costing him the match.
The game follows the adventures of "Sayo-chan", a young Shinto shrine maiden living in Feudal Japan. One night, while Sayo-chan is fanning a ceremonial fire, she is visited by the Seven Lucky Gods, who warn her of a great, impending danger. Suddenly, a band of mischievous goblins appear and kidnap the gods, quickly retreating to a faraway mountain range. Sayo-chan, determined to help the gods, sets off on a journey across the countryside, where she confronts a number of strange creatures from Japanese mythology, including yokai, obake, and yurei-like monsters. After defeating several powerful goblin leaders, Sayo must battle their leader, the ancient serpent Orochi.
The game follows the adventures of "Sayo-chan", a young Shinto shrine maiden living in Feudal Japan. One night, while Sayo-chan is fanning a ceremonial fire, she is visited by the Seven Lucky Gods, who warn her of a great, impending danger. Suddenly, a band of mischievous goblins appear and kidnap the gods, quickly retreating to a faraway mountain range. Sayo-chan, determined to help the gods, sets off on a journey across the countryside, where she confronts a number of strange creatures from Japanese mythology, including yokai, obake, and yurei-like monsters. After defeating several powerful goblin leaders, Sayo must battle their leader, the ancient serpent Orochi.
At Aztec Warfare III Pentagón was attacked by Black Lotus (who swore revenge on Pentagón for breaking her arm at Ultima Lucha Dos) along with Members of The Black Lotus Triad Hitokiri, Doku and Yurei and was eliminated by Johnny Mundo. Two weeks later he faced the Black Lotus triad members in a gauntlet match in a losing effort and got his arm broken by Black Lotus and El Dragon Azteca Jr, who also swore revenge on Pentagón for breaking his arm. On June 25 at "Ultima Lucha Tres", Pentagón Dark defeated Son of Havoc in a ladder match to win the vacant Gift of the Gods Championship, which also earned him a future shot at the Lucha Underground Championship. He cashed in his shot the following day and defeated Prince Puma in a "Loser Must Retire" match to become the new Lucha Underground Champion.
Schork regards his film work as the art form he loves the most, because "it is the synthesis of everything else [he does]". His first film was the feature-length documentary "voile: sails in the desert" (2008), about his efforts to bring his 2007 award-winning sculpture four-thousand miles to the Nevada desert for Burning Man, and the various ways in which people interacted with the sculpture in the desert. A series of short films followed ("the rings", "the nightwatchman", etc...), culminating in 2011's "tsuki no mon: yurei no mori (moongate: forest of ghosts)"(trailer), in which his wood sculpture, covered in messages to lost loved ones, was burned in a private ceremony on Big Torch Key. Schork also participated in the Tampa Bay 48 Hour Film Project in the summers of 2012 ("a rose for cecile") and 2013 ("G_O_O_M_B_A_S").
The character of Sadako and particularly Samara Morgan have been well received by audiences and film critics alike. "The Movie Book" describes Sadako as influencing the whole Japanese horror genre, making the mythological image of the yurei popular in film. British film critic Mark Kermode lists Sadako's iconic crawl out of a television set as his seventh scariest moment from the horror film genre. The scene also came sixth in Channel 4's "100 Greatest Scary Moments". On August 10, 2002, Sadako was given a public funeral at the Laforet Museum in Harajuku, Tokyo, to tie-in with the opening of a "Ring" exhibit at the museum and the release of "The Ring", with Koji Suzuki attending the funeral. "Empire"'s Mark Dinning described Samara as one of the film industry's most "unrelenting, unreasonable, plain uncontrollable baddies ever." Daveigh Chase has been praised for her performance, and won the MTV Movie Award for Best Villain at the 2003 ceremony.
Kitano plays Machisu, who is born into a wealthy family, but loses both his parents as a child. When his father (Akira Nakao) commits suicide after the collapse of his business, Machisu's stepmother (Mariko Tsutsui) sends him to live with an aunt and uncle who mistreat him and finally send him to an orphanage. As a young man, Machisu (Yurei Yanagi) attends art school and finds his style of painting challenged by the more experimental and conceptual work turned in by his classmates. Machisu takes a job in order to pay for art school, and strikes up a friendship with a fellow co-worker, Sachiko (Kumiko Aso), who seems to grasp his artistic vision. They get married and have a daughter. As he grows older, Mashisu's obsession with contemporary art controls his whole life, leaving him insensitive of everything around him, including the death of his own daughter (Eri Tokunaga) and his wife's desertion. He tries to please the art critics, remaining penniless. He is caught up in a fire and almost dies. Losing all his previous works, he is left with a single half-burnt soda can, which he assesses at 200,000 yen and tries to sell. This ends up kicked carelessly away when his wife picks him up from the street. They walk away together, seemingly finally rid of his artistic obsession.
Genrin Yamaoka, an intellectual from the Edo period, commented on funayurei that appear as balls of fire or ghosts at sea. Referring to Zhu Xi and the Cheng-Zhu school, he brought up several examples of departed souls that died with resentment and remained even after carrying out their revenge, and concluded, "even by seeing something from 10 people, by sometimes going along with reason, you can also sometimes see it in ancient Chinese books (かやうの事つねに十人なみにあることには待らねども、たまたまはある道理にして、もろこしの書にもおりおり見え待る)". Although it is not possible to get a hold of smoke with one's hands, by accumulating it and staining one's hand, it is possible to take it into one's hands. The spirit (気, ki) is the beginning of one's nature, and when the spirit stagnates, the ones that create a form and produce a voice are called yurei. In the first place, the stagnated spirits of the ghosts desire to fall, and disappear.
Schork is perhaps best known for his giant sculptures. From his studio in Key West, Florida, which he opened with his late wife Mary Cooke Hoeft in 1998, he produced artwork for the public art expo SculptureKeyWest in 2005 ("Athena"), 2006 (the giant wind chimes "for the children of astrios & eos"), 2007 ("pour les enfants d'astrios et eos ii: voile", 3rd prize Grand Esplanade award), and 2010 ("tsuki no mon ni: yurei no mori"). In 2007, Schork transported "pour les enfants d'astrios et eos ii: voile" to the Burning Man festival in Nevada, where he also created the theme camp "artbUS" and produced and directed a movie (see below). In 2011, he was awarded a grant by Burnt Oranges, Inc., an Orlando-based Burning Man Regional organisation and another grant by the Key West art group Anne McKee Artists Fund for the sculpture "le bateau des fantômes", a ship built entirely of driftwood, sticks, and tree limbs intended for a public bonfire. In 2010, in association with the Key West Garden Club, Schork built "autumn leaves for jack & helena", a series of giant leaves, acorns, and mushrooms inspired by Jonathan Swift, Lewis Carroll, and "two small children who lived briefly at his house in 2007", with "original verse in English, French, Russian, and Japanese" featured on the pieces of sculpture. Other public sculpture includes a celebration wall at the Gulfport Senior Center, a giant wind chime, and a set of musical instruments in Gulfport, Florida, and a fountain in the Pinellas County Botanical Garden in Largo, Florida.